no pipeline, no tankers, no problem 2

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Pondering

And the feds blink

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/mckenna-outlines-pipeline-protections-ah...

OTTAWA - Environment Minister Catherine McKenna is floating the idea of a joint Ottawa-B.C. panel of scientists to enhance existing research on oil spills as the federal government continues pressing its case for the Trans Mountain expansion project.

McKenna is making the proposal to B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman just as the province prepares to unveil the question it will ask the Court of Appeal as it tries to limit the flow of oil through the expanded pipeline.

In a letter released today, McKenna says Ottawa has already taken steps to mitigate the damage in the event of a spill, including increased capacity to tow ships and five new emergency response stations, and says she is willing to address some of B.C.'s additional concerns.

If B.C. is interested, she says Canada would also consider a joint scientific advisory panel to take stock of the science available on oil spills, including current models of how to respond in the event of an incident involving a number of different petroleum products.

McKenna also says B.C.'s consultation paper on oil spill management left out the very federal policies and programs she says prove why the federal government believes the pipeline is safe.

 

But....

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/morneau-has-no-timeline-for-getting-tran...

Finance Minister Bill Morneau says the federal government sees advantages in getting the Trans Mountain pipeline extension built “rapidly,” but can’t offer a timeline for getting the job done....

Speaking with CTV’s Question Period host Evan Solomon, Morneau said the time for expressing concerns about the $7.4-billion project -- which the Liberal government approved in 2016 -- has passed.

“We’ve gone through a robust assessment of the environmental issues, we’ve talked with Indigenous Canadians, we’ve come up with an oceans protection plan that makes sense to ensure that we deal with the issues on the table,” said Morneau, speaking from Washington, D.C.

The message remains that the pipeline is going through. The "joint advisory panel" is just another means of the government claiming their measures are sufficient to protect the environment. The only permitted response is "yes" maybe with some added spill response measures.

The court cases just got a huge boost with the news that public servants were told to present reports that supported the pipeline. 

It is very bizarre that they are pushing so hard when the courts could still rule against it. It will takes years to get through the Supreme Court.

I'm getting tired of this line "Trudeau responded by accusing New Democrats and Conservatives of trying to force the government to choose between either the environment or the economy."

Apparently "the economy" is just another word for the Transmountain pipeline in Trudeau's lexicon. He is right that we don't have to choose between the economy and environmental protection. We can reject the pipeline without destroying the economy. 

Pondering

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2018/04/26/news/cenovus-posts-914-milli...

Cenovus Energy Inc. says it will consider slowing development of a 50,000-barrel-per-day oilsands expansion project that it started building early last year if there isn't meaningful progress on increasing pipeline capacity out of Alberta....

"We will not be considering any material new additions until we see clear line of sight to increased pipeline capacity out of the province," he said on the conference call.

Pourbaix's comments follow years of delays and uncertainty surrounding several major pipeline projects from Alberta's oilsands to export markets. The Keystone XL project to Texas has been delayed, work on the Energy East line to Quebec and New Brunswick is halted and the future of an expanded Trans Mountain line to Vancouver is in doubt.

But wait!  Don't they know the alternative to pipelines is shipping by rail? Isn't that what pipeline opponents are constantly threatened with?  If we don't build pipelines it will be shipped by rail?

Transmountain is still before the courts. Horgan isn't delaying anything with his Supreme Court reference. Line 3 is approved, as long as they follow the same route and take out the old pipe. Not taking the old pipe out was their decision and they should be forced to do it. Keystone XL has been approved so why aren't they building it? Why push Transmountain?

I think the oil companies don't want a new pipeline. It is all a sham. Companies are going to be dropping like flies but until then as much money as possible will be drained from shareholders and citizens. 

I almost said "taxpayers".  That is a right wing term intended to make people see themselves as wallets instead of citizens. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Anglican Priest Arrested on Burnaby Mountain

An Anglican priest was arrested April 20 on Burnaby Mountain challenging Kinder Morgan's pipeline. Her words gave us chills.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Thursday, April 26 at 5 PM - 9 PM PDT

Wilderness Committee National Office - 46 E. 6th Ave., Vancouver

In preparation for next week's rallies at MPs offices, we're painting a brand new banner! We need to show the federal government we will not stand by and let them use our taxpayer dollars to bail out Kinder Morgan's pipeline, trample Indigenous rights, fuel climate change and threaten our precious coast.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Tiny House Warriors: Building Tiny Homes To Defend Against Oil Pipeline

Ten tiny houses are about to go head-to-head with a giant proposed oil pipeline. In what some area already dubbing the next 'Standing Rock', Kanahus Manuel, an activist of the Secwepemc Nation is spearheading a team of builders and volunteers from all over North America to construct tiny homes with the aim of halting the expansion of the Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline which would run through 518 kilometres of Secwepemc Territory. The proposed pipeline comes just 3 years after the disastrous incident at Mt Polley, where water and slurry with years worth of mining waste were released into Polley Lake. This group of dedicated activists say that building the tiny homes is not only an act of resistance, but also of creation, building something beautiful, to create hope and create homes for the community.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..this piece was posted once before and i do so again to highlight the struggle within indigenous nations re: band councils and km pipeline. the scc has already ruled some years ago that band councils only have authority over a small part of the land but not over the greater indigenous territory. to make this even worse the fed gov and km understand this very well.

Trudeau’s Trans Mountain fight isn’t with B.C., it’s with First Nations

quote:

SECWEPEMC OPPOSITION

There are other reasons First Nations hold the balance of power in this fight, according to experts.

The Secwepemc Nation is the largest First Nation in the province with traditional territory stretching from the Rockies down into the B.C. interior. Half of the proposed pipeline, or about 518 kilometers of it, would pass through Secwepemc territory. The Secwepemc Nation has never signed a treaty with the Crown, so having the nation’s permission is extremely important for the pipeline to proceed.

Kinder Morgan claims it has that permission because it negotiated and signed benefit agreements with First Nation band councils along the route, including several Secwepemc band councils. But there’s a catch. Band councils were implemented by the federal government under the Indian Act, and they are not the only form of First Nations governance. By signing an agreement with the company, Secwepemc community members say the band councils ran afoul of traditional Indigenous law that predated the Indian Act.

According to Indigenous oral history, Secwepemc people have lived on their traditional territory since the last ice age, and newly found archaeological evidence suggests a First Nations presence in B.C. dating back 14,000 years. Before the 1876 Indian Act, First Nations had their own laws and governance systems that are recognized in Canada’s constitution under section 35. Secwepemc law states that title to the land is held collectively. In reaction to benefit agreements signed by band councils allowing the pipeline to proceed, Secwepemc community members released a declaration denouncing the agreements as “cynical attempts to divide and conquer our people.”

“We hereby explicitly and irrevocably refuse its passage through our territory,” the Secwepemc community members wrote about Trans Mountain.

To make matters worse for Kinder Morgan, band councils only have a say over reserve land, which makes up only about 0.2 percent of Secwepemc territory, according to Secwepemc political leader Arthur Manuel. So, even if Kinder Morgan’s benefit agreements with the Secwepemc band councils survived legal scrutiny, they would only allow the pipeline through a tiny portion of the group’s traditional territory.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Heh. With the right crews and machinery you can put up tiny houses in hours.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..did you watch the video 17? it's interesting as they are building them on wheels.

Indigenous People and Swiss pensioners challenge Switzerland’s biggest banks on oil pipeline funding

Women from the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation and the Swiss Klimaseniorinnen (Senior Women for Climate Protection) are at Credit Suisse and UBS headquarters today demanding that banks stop financing oil pipeline companies. The activists have set up a tipi in front of the headquarters to protest the pipelines, which cut through land, threaten Indigenous rights and human rights, put drinking water and wildlife at risk of oil spills, and contribute to climate change.

“Our goal is clear, there must be justice and accountability for banks and corporations. Indigenous Peoples are in danger, we need Europeans to act, to divest, to organise within their respective nations to make their banks accountable for Indigenous human rights abroad. We need Europe to stand and fight alongside us,” said Michelle Cook, a Diné/Navajo human rights lawyer.

The Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation, organised by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), travelled to the heart of Switzerland’s financial district to demand that Swiss banks stop financing pipeline companies. They represent Indigenous Peoples from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, the Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota, the Diné/Navajo, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Louisiana’s United Houma Nation. 

They were joined by Klimaseniorinnen (Senior Women for Climate Protection), a people-powered movement of Swiss citizens over 65 who are suing the Swiss Government for its inaction on climate change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..it was a humbling experience to listen to her speak.

..watch here

Chief Maureen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation speaking at Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development regarding Bill C-69 on April 24, 2018.

Bill C-69 is the Impact Assessment Act - An Act respecting a federal process for impact assessments and the prevention of significant adverse environmental effects.

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BC Needs To Use Full Toolbox to Stop Kinder Morgan

quote:

The escalating war of words

Horgan and Environment Minister George Hayman both deserve top marks in the verbal squabble with Alberta and Ottawa. While Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and our New Age Prime Minister appear anxious, aggressive and increasingly desperate with their multiple threats, both of B.C.’s main spokespeople on all things Kinder Morgan have appeared unflustered, undeterred and reasonable. Horgan and Heyman may be overwhelmed on the volume of hyperbole, but on substance and tone they win hands down.

Horgan’s strong performance is welcome news to anti-pipeline warriors who have been nervous because of Horgan’s uneven resolve before he formed government. Remember back to the day, after then-NDP leader Adrian Dix’s unexpected 2013 Earth Day announcement of opposition to Kinder Morgan, when Horgan knee-capped his boss by infamously speculating that the oil port could perhaps be moved to Deltaport or Fraser Surrey Docks. Perhaps personally witnessing the devastation of the tugboat Nathan E. Stewart oil spill in Bella Bella was the epiphany that strengthened his resolve on Kinder Morgan.

quote:

British Columbia’s mixed approach

The appointment of Thomas Berger to represent British Columbia as outside counsel on Kinder Morgan was applauded, but many of the subsequent choices have been ill considered. B.C.’s most egregious misstep was the decision to stand behind the evidence introduced by the previous Christy Clark government in the Squamish Nation’s challenge of the province’s Kinder Morgan approval. Ironically, while it is fighting off the big bad wolves from the other side of the Rockies, in the B.C. Supreme Court Horgan’s government defended the conclusion of the Clark government that Kinder Morgan would not have significant environmental impacts and that obligations to the Squamish had been fulfilled. Horgan’s government defended Clark’s approval despite knowing there were bureaucrats who were pulled off the Kinder Morgan file by the Clark government because they objected to the way First Nation and Squamish concerns were being ignored.

Berger could have easily gathered this evidence and filed it in the Squamish case. An affidavit from one of these government officials attesting to the inadequacies of Clark’s approval would have gone a long way to helping the Squamish quash Kinder Morgan’s environmental certificate, thus killing the proposal. Instead Horgan’s government decided to defend Clark’s approval, arguing it was obligated to because constitutional convention and the “honour of the Crown demands that B.C. defend its actions.” Filing a revised factual record that more accurately reflects what happened would uphold the Crown’s honour, not undermine it.

The B.C. government also seems to have lost sight of resetting the relationship with First Nations when reviewing the 1,187 provincial permits Kinder Morgan requires. It has committed to reviewing and reconciling laws and policies with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and the Supreme Court’s Tsilhqot’in decision. This is no easy task; it will take time.

In the meantime, the government could implement the spirit and intent of its commitment in the power sharing agreement by instructing the staff reviewing Kinder Morgan’s permits to bend over backwards to engage affected First Nations on any issue, even if they tangentially involved. This doesn’t appear to have happened.

Unionist

epaulo13 wrote:

..it was a humbling experience to listen to her speak.

..watch here

Chief Maureen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation speaking at Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development regarding Bill C-69 on April 24, 2018.

Bill C-69 is the Impact Assessment Act - An Act respecting a federal process for impact assessments and the prevention of significant adverse environmental effects.

Humbling indeed. Thanks for this, epaulo.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..glad you got to hear it unionist

..survey ends apr 30

B.C. Spills Regulation

About this Survey

Welcome to the 2018 Spill Regulations public engagement survey. British Columbia is enhancing the way the province prepares for, responds to, and recovers from environmental emergencies. This work started with the foundational phase of regulations and enhancements to the Environmental Management Act, which came into effect in October 2017. The Province is now considering a second phase of regulatory changes to enhance spill management across the province.  British Columbians are being invited to provide input on the government’s approach to spill response regulations.

Estimated completion time: 10 to 15 minutes

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..includes a new 2 min video.

WHAT IS DILUTED BITUMEN AND IS IT MORE DANGEROUS THAN CONVENTIONAL OIL?

The BC Government has stated that the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline should not move forward until  the potential impacts of a diluted bitumen spill are studied.

The Royal Society of Canada’s 2015 expert panel report identified seven major research gapsregarding scientific uncertainties on bitumen.

The panel identified seven “high priority research needs,” which are:

  • The impact of oil spills in high-risk and poorly understood areas, such as the Arctic.
  • The effects on aquatic wildlife.
  • A national baseline research and monitoring program for areas that may be affected by a spill in the future
  • Controlled field research to understand how a spectrum of crude types behave in different ecosystems and conditions
  • Investigating the efficacy of spill response and being able to learn from spills soon after they occur.
  • Improved spill prevention
  • Improved risk assessment protocols for oil spills.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

‘I was in shock,’ says government insider about instructions to ensure approval of Kinder Morgan pipeline

A new government insider has emerged to add their voice in support of allegations raised this week that Canada's review of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion project was rigged.

Following the news report, another public servant spoke to National Observer confirming that they attended the Oct. 27, 2016 meeting. The instructions from then-associate deputy minister Erin O'Gorman about the major oil expansion project left them in shock.

"I'm not sure if that was word-for-word, but that was certainly the gist of the message. So I can't say if that was a direct quote, but that was the message I heard,” said the public servant, who spoke to National Observer on condition of anonymity. "I was in shock."

quote:

The government has tabled new legislation, Bill C-69, to undo some of Harper's changes, but allowed the Trans Mountain review to proceed under Harper's rules after adding an additional consultation and review process, which federal insiders say was inadequate.

'All legally sound from Gitxaala'

The words "legally sound" also appear in records released by the Trudeau government through access to information legislation in response to a request for documents and notes produced at the Oct. 27, 2018 meeting in Vancouver.

They appear next to a sharp arrow with two lines on the left-hand column of personal notes taken by another public servant who was at the meeting.

“All legally sound from Gitxaala,” says the writing next to the arrow.

The message continues on the next line: “Convey with fidelity what they have chosen to do,” the writing appears to say.

These messages are on the second of two pages of handwritten notes taken during the special meeting involving five federal departments and the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority related to Kinder Morgan.

This portion of the notes was listed in a section of “risks” about the federal government’s consultations, at that time, with First Nations about Texas-based Kinder Morgan's plans to build its Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

Gitxaala is a reference to a court case that had been decided a few months earlier, in June 2016, when the Federal Court of Appeal concluded that the former Harper government had failed in its legal duty to consult First Nations prior to approving another west coast oil expansion project, Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline.

quote:

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr told iPolitics earlier this week that “there were no directions” given to public servants about the Trans Mountain project.

His comments came after the government had spent several days avoiding any direct comments about the allegations raised by public servants.

The allegations have already had some political ramifications in Ottawa, where the NDP pressed the government for three consecutive days this week to explain what happened during the meeting.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has also sent a letter to Trudeau that urged the prime minister to release all federal records, related to the government’s review of Trans Mountain, including its secret cabinet documents.

quote:

Meantime, the Federal Court of Appeal continues to deliberate over a legal challenge about whether the Canadian government fulfilled its constitutional duty to consult First Nations, including the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, about the project.

A decision is expected later this spring, but could likely be appealed to the Supreme Court, regardless of the outcome.

LB Cultured Thought

epaulo13 wrote:

‘I was in shock,’ says government insider about instructions to ensure approval of Kinder Morgan pipeline

A new government insider has emerged to add their voice in support of allegations raised this week that Canada's review of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion project was rigged.

Following the news report, another public servant spoke to National Observer confirming that they attended the Oct. 27, 2016 meeting. The instructions from then-associate deputy minister Erin O'Gorman about the major oil expansion project left them in shock.

"I'm not sure if that was word-for-word, but that was certainly the gist of the message. So I can't say if that was a direct quote, but that was the message I heard,” said the public servant, who spoke to National Observer on condition of anonymity. "I was in shock."

 

If only there were some arm's length professional body to adjudicate these project decisions without the government inserting itself into every decision....oh wait....we used to call that the NEB.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..in the past few years revelations regarding the neb shows it is not arms length nor even independent from the governing party nor the industry. revelations show it has been stacked with pro extraction folk. the neb is a tool used by the gov to get almost any project approved no matter how damaging it is.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The Warrior Song of Ta’ah Amy George

When the Tsleil Waututh (People of the Inlet) found out in 2012 about Kinder Morgan’s expansion plans (twinning the pipeline, dredging Burrard Inlet, increasing tanker traffic seven-fold to transport toxic bitumen to China), they held a community gathering on their reserve across the inlet from Kinder Morgan’s Westridge facility. This was when Amy George, a 76 year old grandmother, and daughter of Chief Dan George, famously stood up. A strong woman with shoulder-length grey hair and large dark eyes, she told the group that as far as she was concerned there was too much at stake from an oil spill. The inlet – which the Tsleil Waututh have called home for 30,000 years, -- had to be protected

“‘Put down your gameboys,” she said, “and turn off your TV sets. It’s time to Warrior Up!”

The words had their affect.

The Tsleil Waututh unanimously voted against accommodating the Texas oil giant; Warrior Up became the battle cry of the anti-Kinder Morgan movement; and Amy George, Ta’ah (grandmother) as she is affectionately known by indigenous and non-indigenous activists, has become ‘the wisdom and spirit’ behind the protests on Burnaby Mountain, as Stand.canada director Karen Mahon puts it.

quote:

Amy begins by telling me about swimming in the inlet as a girl, of her brother, Leonard, getting swept by the current that flows through the centre, of playing in the salty water all through the summer. We talk about how chlorinated pools can’t compare to swimming in the ocean.

“My father used to carry me on his back,” she recalls. “The water was crystal clear. You could see a crab moving so far down.” After swimming her father would gather clams, set them on a fire around a crab pot. They’d eat what was right there on the beach.

“This is our home,” she tells me, adding that her father once said to her that they’d have to shoot him, before he’d be forced to leave. “Now Justin wants to ram the pipeline down our throats.”

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..more

quote:

She slides without warning to St. Paul’s Indian Residential School, run by Sisters of the Child Jesus, and the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, in North Vancouver. The terrors she experienced happened less than ten miles from where I grew up, in Horseshoe Bay. We played in the same salt water. Like her, I swam to log booms, lay on the logs basking in the sun. Yet when I turned six, I held my brother’s hand and walked to Gleneagles Elementary, while Amy George went with her weeping mother to St Paul’s, where she was locked in a place she now likens to a prison. If anyone tried to escape, she says, they were brought back by the police.

It is hard to touch the past, and yet she does. It’s part of healing, she says.

Almost in a whisper she tells of a little boy who was thrown down the stairs by a nun. His head was badly injured. For two days he complained of headaches before being taken to hospital. He didn’t come back. When a friend of Amy’s worked up the courage to ask what had happened, a nun answered lightly: “Oh, he died.”

There was hard physical abuse, for speaking their language, and for seemingly trivial things, like a time she and a friend innocently played a game of exchanging their shoes. Her hands, where she was whipped, still ache when she weaves.

“One time I got sixteen lashes. What could I have done, a little girl, that warranted this?” She tells me that the children would say to each other not to cry, no matter what. Not to give the nuns the satisfaction.

There was sexual abuse, too. Amy blocked it out for years. “I made my whole childhood gray.” As she meets my gaze, I see the eyes of an old woman, and the eyes of the vulnerable little girl, both at once.

“When I first started talking, I used to get up on the stage and I’d just start to cry. I was so sad. I couldn’t help it. Rueben my son, he said, ‘If it hurts that bad, maybe you don’t have to speak.’” She shakes her head. “I still speak. I’m just learning not to cry so much.”

“Will you keep fighting Kinder Morgan?”

She straightens in her chair. “No matter what,” she says simply. “What more can Kinder Morgan or the government do to me? I guess they could shoot me.”

She is tired. I thank her and go. As I drive away my heart is full.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

For 15 Years, Energy Transfer Partners Pipelines Leaked an Average of Once Every 11 Days: Report

5,475 days, 527 pipeline spills: that's the math presented in a new report from environmental groups Greenpeace USA and the Waterkeeper Alliance examining pipelines involving Dakota Access builder Energy Transfer Partners (ETP). It's based on public data from 2002 to 2017.

All told, those leaks released 3.6 million gallons of hazardous liquids, including 2.8 million gallons of crude oil, according to data collected from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

That doesn't include an additional 2.4 million gallons of “drilling fluids, sediment, and industrial waste” leaked during ETP's construction of two pipelines in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan. Also left out: air pollution and leaks from natural gas pipelines, which were beyond the scope of the new report but which play a significant role in climate change and can cause explosions....

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The NDP’s Oil Problem

quote:

Contradictions of Canadian Social Democracy

Because the BC NDP is a minority one with confidence and supply agreement support of the Greens, Premier John Horgan has had some wiggle room to dial back some progressive promises.

Showing his party’s class biases, Green Party leader Andrew Weaver came out against card check certification and a quick phase in of a $15 minimum wage. Card check has been dropped, and a $15.20 minimum wage will be phased in over thirty-nine months which is a longer phase in than the other provinces introducing the $15 minimum wage.

Horgan could have tried to sell these revised policies as the reality of governing in a minority situation. Yet he went ahead and approved completing construction of Site C and providing subsidies for the LNG industry, two issues that the Greens were against and central to their campaign.  For his part, it does not look like Weaver is going to collapse the government over this issue any time soon, but the next budget in spring 2019 remains a possibility. There have been rumors that Horgan is pressing these issues in order to force an election while his government has strong approval ratings in order to obtain a majority.

These conflicts aren’t just risky for the NDP governments in the short term. They’ll have long term consequences for the NDP across Canada. They are failing to see, for instance, that the Trans Mountain protesters, who should be the NDP’s natural base, will also form the backbone of any anti-Site C or anti-LNG resistance.

Fundamentally, the NDP is still dedicated to fossil fuel development and have yet to articulate a real exit strategy and green economic alternative. The best they can offer up is more stringent regulation and carbon pricing, but these fossil fuels need to be left in the ground to avoid catastrophic climate change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

quote:

An Alternative Exists

Canada’s labor and social movements are advocating approaches that could provide the NDP with an out to this problem, the most prominent of which is the “Leap Manifesto.” The Manifesto, which has created much controversy among the conservative and building trades sections of the party, calls for an ambitious economy that uses only green energy and leaves fossil fuels in the ground.

In 2016, the federal NDP convention passed a motion to study and discuss the “Leap Manifesto” though little seems to have come of it. While it is fair to critique the document for being light on the nuts and bolts of policy, it is still an important aspirational document that has brought together indigenous, environmental, and labor activists.

There are also policies and being proposed and implemented within the labor movement that could help chart a path forward.

The Canadian labor movement has been a key player in the creation of the “just transition” policy framework, which seeks a fair outcome for fossil-fuel-industry workers and others who will lose their jobs in the switch to a green economy. Despite an international reputation as just-transition advocates during the 1980s and 1990s, the Canadian labor movement was something of a laggard on the issue in the early 2000s. That has been changing.

The Canadian Labour Congress and the Toronto and York Region District Labour Council have devised detailed plans to green the economy at the national and city level respectively. LIUNA Canada has signed a historic agreement with the Assembly of First Nations that its members will not work on projects that have not been granted indigenous consent. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers, arguably Canada’s most radical union, has come up with a plan to green Canada Post and turn post offices into environmentally friendly community hubs. Quebec’s Confédération des syndicats nationaux has helped to create a climate fund to finance GHG reducing projects.

NDPP

Canada is Unable To Lower Carbon Emissions Thanks To NAFTA

http://rabble.ca/news/2018/04/canada-unable-lower-carbon-emissions-thank...

Meanwhile, this is what Minister Freeland and the oiligarchy are negotiating while few seem to pay much attention let alone protest, ah well, so be it...'New Nafta Coming Soon'.

Pondering

NDPP wrote:

Canada is Unable To Lower Carbon Emissions Thanks To NAFTA

http://rabble.ca/news/2018/04/canada-unable-lower-carbon-emissions-thank...

Meanwhile, this is what Minister Freeland and the oiligarchy are negotiating while few seem to pay much attention let alone protest, ah well, so be it...'New Nafta Coming Soon'.

 In the other, Canada goes proportionality-free and phases out the export of bitumen and fracked oil and gas by 2030. Canada also ends oil and gas imports and uses domestic conventional supplies as transition fuels. In both scenarios, Canada reduces GHGs as aggressively as permitted.

That will never happen regardless of NAFTA. If Canadians were anywhere close to thinking like the above NAFTA couldn't stop us. We'd pull out. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

How Likely is a Canadian Oil-by-Rail Boom?

quote:

But there are two major issues with such analysis: 1) there’s not enough rail capacity to substitute for pipelines; and 2) transporting oil by rail wouldn't be nearly as unsafe as it currently is if government updates its rules and enforcement.

Ignoring such realities may allow for convenient pro-pipeline mythmaking, but not for reasonable fact-based debate.

“Governments and industry uses it to fearmonger a little bit to justify pipeline capacity expansions,” said Patrick DeRochie, climate and energy program manager at Environmental Defence. “But if they were actually concerned about mitigating the risks of oil by rail, there are some pretty clear and simple steps they can take.”

Here’s a breakdown of what’s actually going on.

IEA predicts rail exports could nearly triple by 2019

In February 2018, the most recent month that we have data for, Canada shipped a daily average of 134,100 barrels of oil to the United States on trains. While not an insignificant amount, it was nowhere close to the historical high of December 2014 — when oil-by-rail exports hit 175,600 barrels per day (bpd) due to pipeline constraints.

Such figures don’t include oil that’s shipped by rail across Canada. A recent Globe & Mail article reported that more than 150,000 barrels of oil are moved daily on British Columbia’s railways. Much of that ends up being exported to the United States.

To put such numbers in perspective, Alberta produced an average of 3.4 million barrels of oil per day in February. So rail shipments represented only five per cent of the province’s output.

The concern is that those numbers will rapidly rise in the near future, well beyond the December 2014 threshold.

“It’s real and people have been predicting it,” said Bruce Campbell, former executive director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and author of an upcoming book about the Lac-Mégantic tragedy. “As production keeps increasing, there’s uncertainty about the pipelines, so there is that looming possibility.”

In March, the International Energy Agency forecasted that Canada’s oil-by-rail exports could increase to 250,000 bpd in 2018 and 390,000 bpd in 2019. Kevin Birn of IHS Markit told Reuters that exports could go higher than 400,000 bpd if pipelines face more delays.

To put all those numbers in perspective, the rosiest forecast would mean an increase of 266,000 barrels per day via rail. Meanwhile, Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposes to add more than double that with 590,000 barrels per day of capacity.

CP and CN already facing major backlog of grain shipments

According to the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, there’s already a total of 754,000 bpd in rail loading capacity in Western Canada, including 210,000 bpd at Kinder Morgan’s very own co-owned terminal in Edmonton.

So why on earth aren’t oil producers using that spare rail capacity? Well, for the very same reason that some are doubtful oil-by-rail is going to see any kind of major increase: there simply aren’t enough trains to go around.

DeRochie is skeptical about projections by the International Energy Agency.

“There might be a small incremental increase in the oil being shipped by rail, but we’re looking at the tens of thousands of barrels, which is nowhere near the capacity that pipelines would introduce to the system,” DeRochie said.

Canada’s two freight rail companies, Canadian Pacific (CP) and Canadian National (CN), are facing ongoing criticism from grain producers on the Prairies for critical delays that have left massive quantities of wheat and canola unable to get to markets. Grain shipments are ultimately the “bread and butter” of freight rail in Canada — and the companies are failing to adequately service even them.

NorthReport

Government earmarks $2 million for pro-pipeline advertising campaign

http://calgaryherald.com/news/politics/government-earmarks-2-million-for...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
While it is fair to critique the document for being light on the nuts and bolts of policy, it is still an important aspirational document that has brought together indigenous, environmental, and labor activists.

A "goal" without a plan is a "wish".

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
While it is fair to critique the document for being light on the nuts and bolts of policy, it is still an important aspirational document that has brought together indigenous, environmental, and labor activists.

A "goal" without a plan is a "wish".

..it's more than a wish when folks are actually doing things. and no one can draw up a plan for a prov, a country or the world mostly because there is no president for where we are today. as with the struggles around the pipeline we make it up as we go along. this is exciting to me. to not be bogged down in some ideology or party. this is grassroots leadership.

iyraste1313

How Likely is a Canadian Oil-by-Rail Boom?...

Thanks for bringing the issue to our attention.....fr4om my orchards in Spences Bridge, I watch the train cars, tanker cars and open coal like cars...hundreds rolling by every half houyr or so...on very shaky ground...this is of course insane...some of the rails right along major slides continuously, certainly endangering communities, not to mention the major river systems and river fish runs...there must be a twin fight against this mode of transport, as well!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

FAITH LEADERS ARRESTED AT KINDER MORGAN GATES

Religious leaders and more than 100 members of diverse faith communities joined the protest against the expansion of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline in Burnaby on Saturday, joining more than 200 people who have been arrested blocking Kinder Morgan's Burnaby tank farm gates since March 10th.

On Saturday in the pouring rain, faith and spirit leaders from Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish, Hindu, Unitarian, Christian, and interfaith communities gathered on Burnaby Mountain at Kwekwecnewtxw - the Watch House before marching to the front gates of Kinder Morgan’s Burnaby Mountain tank farm. There they peacefully sang, prayed, led ceremonies, hung prayer flags and rosaries at the gates and blocked access to the construction site.

Reverend Laurel Dykstra of the Salal + Cedar Watershed Ministry, who helped organize the event, said at the Kinder Morgan gates: “We are here as faith leaders in solidarity with Indigenous people, answering a call from members of Tsleil-Waututh, from spiritual leaders at the Watch House because they have called us to make real our commitment to reconciliation; to make real our commitment the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.”

“This pipeline will not be built,” added Rev. Dykstra....

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more

quote:

"We are here today to ritualize resistance. As a Muslim, I stand in solidarity with Indigenous people in meaningful and intentional ways and take leadership from them," said Amal Rama of the Interfaith Institute for Justice, Peace and Social Movements, an anti-racist, anti-colonial collective.

Bat-Ami Hensen, a member of the Jewish faith community in Victoria, explained that she attended to uphold the calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, as well as honour her faith: “In our Torah it says, ‘Justice, Justice shall you pursue’ and we’re told that the reason justice is repeated twice is because it’s not just for ourselves, but for others.”

Last Friday, 16 clergy and members of faith communities blocked both gates at Kinder Morgan’s Westridge Marine Terminal, shutting down operations for seven hours. Three were arrested.

NDPP

"These are INAC bands, just so you all know, get educated. Our title and rights are held collectively. Bands and orgs are not title holders, these so-called 'First Nations' are actually federally funded and invented by Canada colonial government. We are Indigenous Nations!"

https://twitter.com/KanahusFreedom/status/988624039504588801

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..this happened at camp cloud km in bby on sunday. the camp was set up to keep an eye on km.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from the camp facebook page

nothin' a little more paint can't fix!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

National Observer releases its Trans Mountain files

Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion project is suddenly facing an unexpected legal challenge following a series of investigative reports by National Observer.

The reporting revealed concerns raised by public servants who warned that the government was rushing to approve the pipeline, despite criticism from First Nations that the process was "paternalistic," "unrealistic," and "inadequate." All of this came to light due to documents released through access to information legislation as well as from comments made by government insiders.

A lawyer for the Tsleil-Waututh Nation on the west coast, Scott Smith, has cited this reporting in a legal letter sent on April 26 to the Federal Court of Appeal that opens the door do some new legal maneuvering.

The reporting uncovered explosive details about what happened before Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government approved the Trans Mountain expansion on Nov. 29, 2016.

quote:

In his April 26 legal letter, Smith spelled out initial arguments designed to persuade the court to accept new evidence in a case that is challenging the federal government's approval of the Trans Mountain expansion.

But this request is unusual given that the case was heard about six months ago and the court was already deliberating on its decision.

A lawyer representing Trans Mountain responded the next day with a letter that warned this maneuver could cause "significant" delay. The company has already threatened to pull out by May 31, due to uncertainty about the impact of opposition to the project in B.C.

But the court battle could be part of what brings more facts and evidence to light, beyond what we already know.

Here is a sample of some of the relevant evidence released through access to information legislation and other public information gathered by National Observer over the past two years.

Taking a call from Kinder Morgan's Ian Anderson

On Jan 14 and Jan. 18, 2016, Kinder Morgan Canada reported lobbying Natural Resources Canada's then deputy minister Bob Hamilton, a non-partisan public servant.

When asked for documents related to this lobbying activity, the federal department released a Jan. 14, 2016 memo through access to information legislation that reveals the company's Canadian president, Ian Anderson, had requested a phone call, and was likely interested in speaking about the rules for the federal review of the Trans Mountain expansion project.

Following the memo and the second reported lobbying activity from Jan. 18, high-ranking officials within the department distributed an email that proposed to speed up the federal review of the project in order to prevent Kinder Morgan from abandoning its project.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..another sample

Environment and Climate Change Canada's main warnings about Trans Mountain

The federal environment department has long had concerns about the risks of the Trans Mountain expansion project. In January 2016, the department warned that there were gaps in science that could put public health and safety at risk if the oil expansion project were to be approved.

The department submitted these warnings to a federal panel from the National Energy Board that was reviewing Trans Mountain, but the concerns were rejected when the energy regulator recommended approving the project a few months later. The federal government also accepted the NEB's assessment, but agreed to increase funding for relevant research.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Media malpractice and the bitumen bubble

quote:

But bubbles are not endowed with immortality. They are, as a matter of physics, designed to fail. And the job of journalists is not to be popular, or go along to get along, but to pursue facts that matter – then let them fall ‘without fear or favour’.

Which brings us to Canada’s bitumen bubble, and missing-in-action media coverage, which amounts to malpractice.

In the days following Kinder Morgan’s ultimatum that it would jettison its planned Trans Mountain oil pipeline and forsake Canada unless it gains a clear and certain path to final approvals by May 31, a collective wail of lamentations ensued from oil companies, the pipeline manufacturers, the Alberta premier and Opposition leader, the Prime Minister and his senior cabinet members, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, and major banks. This is natural and fitting, and so is media coverage of their collective fury and resolve to avert that ultimatum. It is a big story. It needs to be covered.

However, it is not the media’s job to assume that opinions without evidence are equal in worth to opinions which are fact-based. Or to assume that the scale and decibel level coming from oilsands advocates is proof of their cause. A noise meter is not evidence. Or to assume that the voices of opposition should be discounted as, at best, merely emotional and at worst, severely irrational.

In a recent three-part series of investigative reports published by The Energy Mix, I laid out an evidence-based argument that there is no credible business case to support an expansion of oil sand exports or the proposed Trans Mountain and Keystone XL pipelines. That Alberta’s bitumen bubble is about to burst, due to multiple global forces far beyond its control.

quote:

If there is no credible business case for expanding bitumen exports (no Asian customers willing to buy huge volumes of Alberta oil at prices significantly higher than U.S. refiners will pay), then there is no business case for the Trans Mountain and Keystone XL pipelines. So no new investment capital for oilsands production or pipeline projects will be put at risk and existing oilsands producers will continue to operate at current scale. That will mean no extra royalty revenues for Alberta’s debt-plagued government to promise before an election next year and no victories for the federal Liberals to tout in 2019.

Pondering

Trudeau probably decided very early on that Transmountain was the best bet because it is just twinning an existing .  Blocking Northern Gateway and getting EE cancelled was intended to give him enough cover to put TM through. If Clark had kept power it probably would have gone through. It's amazing what just a few votes and an agreement to overthrow Clark changed. It could have gone so differently.

NDPP

Pollution From Canadian Refineries an 'Embarrassment' Compared to US

https://globalnews.ca/news/4176459/pollution-from-canadian-refineries-an...

"The average Canadian refinery produced less oil while emitting substantially higher rates of sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides compared with the US average. 'It would be quite an embarrassment to Canada for this data to be more public because it does show how behind we are..."

Martin N.

epaulo13 wrote:

Media malpractice and the bitumen bubble

quote:

But bubbles are not endowed with immortality. They are, as a matter of physics, designed to fail. And the job of journalists is not to be popular, or go along to get along, but to pursue facts that matter – then let them fall ‘without fear or favour’.

Which brings us to Canada’s bitumen bubble, and missing-in-action media coverage, which amounts to malpractice.

In the days following Kinder Morgan’s ultimatum that it would jettison its planned Trans Mountain oil pipeline and forsake Canada unless it gains a clear and certain path to final approvals by May 31, a collective wail of lamentations ensued from oil companies, the pipeline manufacturers, the Alberta premier and Opposition leader, the Prime Minister and his senior cabinet members, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, and major banks. This is natural and fitting, and so is media coverage of their collective fury and resolve to avert that ultimatum. It is a big story. It needs to be covered.

However, it is not the media’s job to assume that opinions without evidence are equal in worth to opinions which are fact-based. Or to assume that the scale and decibel level coming from oilsands advocates is proof of their cause. A noise meter is not evidence. Or to assume that the voices of opposition should be discounted as, at best, merely emotional and at worst, severely irrational.

In a recent three-part series of investigative reports published by The Energy Mix, I laid out an evidence-based argument that there is no credible business case to support an expansion of oil sand exports or the proposed Trans Mountain and Keystone XL pipelines. That Alberta’s bitumen bubble is about to burst, due to multiple global forces far beyond its control.

quote:

If there is no credible business case for expanding bitumen exports (no Asian customers willing to buy huge volumes of Alberta oil at prices significantly higher than U.S. refiners will pay), then there is no business case for the Trans Mountain and Keystone XL pipelines. So no new investment capital for oilsands production or pipeline projects will be put at risk and existing oilsands producers will continue to operate at current scale. That will mean no extra royalty revenues for Alberta’s debt-plagued government to promise before an election next year and no victories for the federal Liberals to tout in 2019.

There is no business case for the TM expansion if, as the above article does, the 'facts' only include information critical of the expansion.

One particularly egregious example is the comparison of VLCCs loading 2 mm bbl in Louisiana to Afrimax tankers loading 550 k bbl in Vancouver without mentioning that VLCCs can't fit in the Panama Canal and that even if they could, the cost of such transit is a large cost. Also missing is the fact that Van to China is 10 days while Louisiana to China is 25 days via Panama and much more via Cape Horn or Capetown.

Is this article simply another hatchet job or are these people really that stupid about economics?

epaulo, do you actually read this stuff or are you too busy beavering out any printed word that supports your agenda?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Tyee Poll: Would You Risk Arrest to Protest Kinder Morgan’s Pipeline Expansion?

B.C. Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Affleck, who granted the injunction to keep pipeline protesters away from Kinder Morgan’s site in Burnaby, recommended April 9 that the “public nature of the breaches warranted criminal sanction.”

Crown counsel Trevor Shaw said the sentencing position for violating this Kinder Morgan injunction is a $500 fine, though there are considerations, such as whether they acted peacefully and whether they have other convictions for administration of justice offences.

We’re wondering what you would do.

* Please note that all poll answers will be publicly viewable, but anonymous.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

B.C. First Nation says feds may have approved Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion before finishing consultations

A British Columbia First Nation is questioning the greenlighting of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, arguing there may be new evidence the federal government failed to complete consultations with First Nations prior to approving the expansion.

quote:

Pushback from government, pipeline company

In a written response from the federal government obtained by CBC News, it outlines it has no position on whether the First Nation should be "permitted to bring this motion at this late date, over six months after the hearing of these proceedings has concluded."

That letter also explains the government does not see the motion as "urgent," but asks the court that if the motion is allowed to proceed that the timeline be brief — 10 days for a government response after the motion, and four days for the Tsleil-Waututh Nation to reply.

The company argues reopening the case now would cause "significant prejudice" against Trans Mountain. In their own letter to the court, they ask for the proposal from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation to be rejected.

In a statement provided to CBC News, Kinder Morgan said this motion would cause unnecessary delay to the case, as a decision was expected this spring. 

6079_Smith_W

Even the oil companies objected to the benefits Kinder Morgan was being allowed by the NEB:

The inventory begins with a $286-billion special fee that Canada’s National Energy Board (NEB) approved in 2011, over the objections of Canadian oil producers. “If they need financing, then they should go to the market,” Chevron said at the time, responding to what it called an “extraordinary precedent”.

http://theenergymix.com/2018/05/02/kinder-morgan-siphons-billions-in-sub...

http://vancouversun.com/opinion/op-ed/robyn-allan-government-aid-key-to-...

 

NDPP

What an evil scam!

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