no pipeline, no tankers, no problem 2

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..my bold

Ottawa Approves Controversial Chemical for Ocean Oil Spills

The federal government has quietly approved the use of a highly controversial chemical for dispersing ocean oil spills, despite growing scientific evidence it doesn’t always work as claimed and even intensifies the toxicity of oil.

Last month Environment Canada released regulations establishing a list of approved “treating agents” for oil spills that included Corexit EC 9500A, which sinks the oil and spreads it through the water column.

Exxon developed Corexit five decades ago to disperse and sink oil and avoid ugly petroleum slicks on beaches.

In 2010 BP used almost two million gallons of Corexit during its catastrophic Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, prompting a raft of scientific studies that challenged its effectiveness and revived concerns about how such emulsifiers can make oil more toxic.

In approving Corexit, Environment Canada argued that so-called spill treating agents “possess favourable characteristics as oil spill countermeasures and offer the potential for high efficacy coupled with low toxicity to biota in the marine environment.”

“The primary objective of treatment with dispersants is to shift the distribution of an oil spill from the water surface down into the water column to divert the oil from impacting more environmentally sensitive habitat, and allow dilution to reduce the impact to aquatic species exposed to the oil,” it stated.

But that’s not what the fishing industry, scientists and technology experts are saying about the dispersant. They contend Corexit poses a substantial hazard to marine life and allows the industry to hide its inability to recover large oil spills with current technologies.

In fact, Transport Canada confirms only 10 to 15 per cent of oil spilled in the ocean is recovered by industry.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from 350.org

We just got subpoenaed

Congress is defending Exxon — and going after us. Yesterday, Texas Rep. Lamar Smith and the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology announced that they’re taking the extraordinary step of issuing subpoenas to us, the attorneys general of New York and Massachusetts, and seven other NGOs, for our work to hold Exxon accountable.

This is the first time climate deniers in Congress have taken legal action against us.

It’s important to show them that we won’t be intimidated or back down. Can you add your name to this open letter?

It’s no secret that corruption runs deep in Congress, but there is something very wrong with this picture: Our elected officials have all the information they need to launch investigations into Exxon’s decades of climate deceit. Instead, they’re investigating us....

 

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Trudeau government denies conflict after appointing former Kinder Morgan partner to review pipeline

The federal government has firmly denied conflict of interest accusations aimed at its decision to appoint an LNG lobbyist with well-known ties to Kinder Morgan to a special panel reviewing a Kinder Morgan pipeline project.

Earlier this week, environmental watchdog Dogwood Initiative demanded that the Trudeau government remove former Tsawwassen First Nation chief Kim Baird from the panel reviewing Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion project, citing her close relationship to the oil and gas industry and to the Texas-based energy giant's Canadian chapter president, Ian Anderson.

quote:

Baird too close for comfort with industry, say stakeholders

Baird was ousted from her leadership position with the Tsawwassen First Nation in 2012, but not before she helped sign a two-way secondment agreement between Kinder Morgan Canada and her band that provides each with ongoing access to one another's employee experience and expertise for the purpose of mutual capacity-building. She spent six months working in close contact with Anderson, as outlined by a promotional video made by the pipeline company, and recently circulated by Dogwood:

In short, Baird's relationship with the pipeline company and financial ties to the industry at large create a strong appearance of conflict of interest, argue stakeholders, an appearance that does little to restore public confidence in the federal review process for energy projects in Canada.

"I think there were many great Canadians who could have been appointed to this position and many people from the First Nations community who could have served on that panel, who had a far more objective relationship with Kinder Morgan," said Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan of the appointment.

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Husky oil spill shuts down water treatment plant in Saskatchewan

Residents of the small western city of North Battleford, Saskatchewan are being asked to cut water consumption as Husky Energy officials race to clean up as much as 250,000 litres of oil spilled from a pipeline.

The municipality shut down its water treatment plant on Friday morning when an oil slick was detected downstream of the city in the North Saskatchewan River. The Husky leak is equivalent to roughly 1,570 barrels of crude oil and other material that flowed into the waterway. Officials don't know yet what caused the disaster.

North Battleford has enough water stored in its reservoirs and tower for three days as it continues to source most of its water from a nearby groundwater well treatment plant. Nevertheless, environmentalists are calling the accident a stark reminder of what Canada is getting itself into if it approves TransCanada Corp's cross-country Energy East pipeline:

“This is another dangerous reminder of the threats that pipelines bring with them," said Mike Hudema, climate and energy campaigner for Greenpeace, of the leak.

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Residents give an earful to oil pipeline panel in Chilliwack

About 75 people gathered at the Coast Hotel in Chilliwack Thursday morning to give their opinion on Kinder Morgan's $6.8-billion Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project to the federal government's Ministerial panel touring the province.

quote:

Early on a number of speakers presented their support for the oil pipeline expansion project. One landowner Robert Meredith said the pipeline goes through his property and he would rather see an expanded project rather than the more dangerous prospect of oil being transported by rail if there is a spill.

"On land you can take the soil and rejuvenate it and clean it up," Meredith said.

But the vast majority of those speaking to the three-member panel were opposed to expanded pipelines as well as oil sands extraction in the first place.

Local resident and former teacher Wendy Major talked about the dangers of diluted bitumen, and the fact that the pipeline runs near three Chilliwack schools.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Neither Law or Order

In Kamloops, dedicated residents raised concerns about Kinder Morgan’s pipeline proposal. These are their stories.

The B.C. portion of the Minister’s Kinder Morgan TransMountain Pipeline Expansion panel tour kicked off this week. First stop: Kamloops, where a small but vocal group of First Nations, local government representatives and residents gathered to share their concerns about the proposed pipeline.

Dogwood’s Director of Strategy, Will Horter, made the long trek from Victoria. And as anyone with Twitter can see, Will and some of Dogwood’s friends did their fair share of work documenting the past two days. So we thought we’d start a repository for all of the “Kinder surprises” and give a full report on the first couple days of proceedings.

When asked about how the two days went, Will replied, “The whole exercise is fairly painful.” And indeed, by all accounts, it was....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i see notley and wall are commenting after the husky oil spill. that pipelines are safer than rail. i don't believe for a second that this is what it comes down to.

Northwest Tribes Band Together to Stop Oil-by-Rail

quote:

Sure enough, the Yakama have joined with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and others to protest the massive Tesoro-Savage oil-by-rail terminal proposed for the banks of the Columbia River in Vancouver. In contrast to the Lummi, the Umatilla and Yakama are willing to let the environmental review process play out before taking overt action to protect their treaty rights.

quote:

In another tactic, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community sued BNSF Railways in April last year for violating a contract between the tribe and the railroad that limited the length of trains that passed through the Swinomish reservation to 25 cars each and required the tribe be informed of changes in cargo. The Swinomish had learned from the media that BNSF was delivering crude oil on trains with 100 cars or more to the Shell and Tesoro refineries in Anacortes.

The tribe won an early decision in the lawsuit when a federal judge denied a BNSF motion to bring the issue before the Surface Transportation Board. The case is properly heard in federal court, the tribe said in a September 2015 statement, “The STB has no jurisdiction over tribal rights.”

quote:

The Lummi Nation showed remarkable unity in its opposition to the terminal, which helped members get through the long fight. Likewise, other tribes are united in opposition to fossil fuel projects across the region. Whatever the end game might be for tribes such as the Yakama and Swinomish, there’s a sense that the tide is turning in their favor. Hillaire sees the current times as empowering for tribes.

“What we have now is an emergence,” he said. “Not just Lummi, but there are a lot of First Nations people—their culture and their social structures, their government itself ... they’re all emerging. I think they see that as a continuation of their sacred responsibility.”

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Pipeline opponents dominate Langley hearings

Opponents of the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline appeared to dominate a public town hall meeting held by the Trans Mountain Expansion (TMX) Ministerial Panel in Langley on Wednesday.

There were more than 30 speakers, virtually all of whom spoke against the twinning of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline to ship Alberta bitumen from the tar sands, including a section that runs through the Township....

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Will Horter: Trudeau's new pipeline process: worse than National Energy Board?

First Nations leaders left in the dark. The public, once again, denied the chance to speak. Add to that a clear conflict of interest at the heart of the panel chosen to review Kinder Morgan’s pipeline proposal and you have a recipe for yet more lawsuits and squandered public trust.

It didn’t have to be this way. After nearly 10 years under Stephen Harper, British Columbians were yearning for a government that cared about public input and would actually listen to them.

We all know how much Harper scorned public consultation, highlighted by Minister Joe Oliver’s attack on well-meaning Canadians as “radicals” for having the temerity to accept the National Energy Board’s invitation to speak at Joint Review Panel hearings on Enbridge’s controversial pipeline and tanker proposal....

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Kinder Morgan expansion "idiotic" and "insane," residents tell federal pipeline panel

Elementary school teacher Janet Pritchard's voice quavered as she described her experience during a devastating oil spill from Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline in Burnaby, B.C..

It was July 24, 2007, when a backhoe ruptured the decades-old pipeline carrying crude from the oilsands to a nearby marine terminal. Black sludge flew 40 feet in the air for at least 25 minutes, while Kinder Morgan, a Texas-based oil giant, mobilized a spill response. The oil covered homes, trees, wildlife and cars, forcing the evacuation of more than 220 Burnaby residents. It dumped nearly 78,000 litres of oil into Vancouver's Burrard Inlet, poisoning 15,000 metres of shoreline.

quote:

The City of Burnaby, where the pipeline will end, is considered a kind of 'ground zero' by project opponents. Pritchard in particular called it "an environmental disaster waiting to happen," Forysthe called it "insane," and other presenters before the three-member panel used more extreme language like "idiotic," and "an absolute joke."

More than 160 Trans Mountain opponents attended the town hall, sporting bright green arm bands that read, "Stop Kinder Morgan" and waving signs calling for the federal government to respect the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The pipeline expansion is officially opposed by a several B.C. municipalities and at least 17 individual First Nations whose unceded territory it would cross.

Not a single presenter piped up in favour of the project, and nearly all expressed some form of distrust in the federal government's panel, concerned that it would not properly relay their concerns to Natural Resources Canada in the fall.

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The wrong direction – economics presentation to Kinder Morgan panel

At the root of this debate is what I call “The New Climate Denialism”.

In this more nuanced (and arguably more insidious) form of climate denialism, our politicians assure us that they understand and accept the scientific warnings about climate change, but they are in denial about what this scientific reality means for policy.

The result is what Marc Lee refers to as an “all of the above” policy – we have carbon pricing and various climate-related regulation, even while committing to significantly expanded oil sands production and promising new bitumen pipelines....

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Langley township tells panel it doesn’t want pipeline here

The expansion of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline through Langley should not be allowed to proceed, a Township spokesperson told a three-member federal panel.

“This cannot be approved,” said Maegen Giltrow, legal counsel for the Township.

Giltrow was presenting a nine-page written submission on behalf of the Township to Trans Mountain Expansion (TMX) Ministerial Panel members Tony Penikett, Kim Baird and Annette Trimbee at the Langley City hearings last month. The document was provided to the Times this week.

Giltrow said the proposed twinning of the existing pipeline operated by the Kinder Morgan company would leave municipalities vulnerable to “considerable risk” from pipeline failures and emergencies, threaten well water quality and create a “substantial financial burden upon local taxpayers.”

“These issues remain outstanding,” Giltrow told the TMX panel....

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Some hereditary Chiefs of the Haida had come out in support of pipelines. The community held a traditional potlatch, which is their governing body, and removed them from their offices. I can't find a link to any MSM stories so I am posting a FB link. My congratulations to the Haida and my friends who were at the potlatch.

https://www.facebook.com/Haida.Tsimshian.Woman/videos/10157221755200364/

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Here is a new article about the potlatch to remove the hereditary chiefs. Proving once again it is folly to mess with the matriarchs.

Quote:

A Haida clan in British Columbia has stripped two hereditary chiefs of their titles because they supported the construction of an Enbridge pipeline that the Nation fought in court.

The two chiefs signed a letter in support of the pipeline, and one of the chiefs told VICE News he met with the company and received per diems, but he believes the issue is being blown out of proportion. The chiefs have threatened a defamation suit for "lies" they say are being spread about them.

On Saturday, in front of 500 people, clan members in Old Massett held a ceremony marked with traditional dances in which the hereditary chiefs were stripped of their leadership, and matriarchs appointed new chiefs in their place. A ceremony like this one hasn't happened since smallpox struck Haida Gwaii, an archipelago along the coast of northern BC, in the 1800s.

Tensions ran high at the potlatch when a group of five clan members crashed the ceremony in opposition, according to clan spokesperson Ernest Swanson. But three RCMP officers guarded the doors, and a group of matriarchs stood between the potlatch crashers and ceremony organizer Chief Darin Swanson to protect him.

The two former chiefs who were stripped of their leadership, Carmen Goertzen of the Yahgu 7laanas Dadens Clan and Francis Ingram of the iits'aaw Yahgu 'laanaas and jaanas Clan, didn't attend the potlatch, saying they weren't invited.

As the heads of their clans, hereditary chiefs are appointed by family matriarchs and are expected to demonstrate and uphold the morals of their families, including peacefulness and modesty. But in this case, because they went against the wishes of their families, their actions are being taken as a betrayal, according to Ernest Swanson, Darin Swanson's nephew.

http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/haida-clan-strips-chiefs-of-titles-for-su...

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..txs krop

..this video is worth a listen. 8.5 min long

Trudeau: this is not the leadership we voted for

Dogwood organizer Mary Leighton tears a strip off the federal government at a panel hearing on the Kinder Morgan oil tanker proposal.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Wondering what’ll happen if Trudeau approves a pipeline? Look south

Many analysts speculate that the Trudeau government will approve the Kinder Morgan TransMountain pipeline this fall. If he does, what kind of resistance should he expect?

Earlier this month, at a pipeline consultation in Vancouver, over 400 people rose from their seats when a speaker asked the overflow crowd gathered in the room to “stand up if a federal approval of Kinder Morgan this December would be just the beginning of your fight.” It’s not surprising to see that kind of principled opposition on the west coast, where tar sands pipelines and tankers have long been an unwelcome presence. But if this is just the beginning of the fight, what would the rest of that fight look like? For a hint, look south.

In Cannon Ball, North Dakota, a protest camp has been growing since mid-August. Led by the Standing Rock Sioux, the camp aims to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, a conduit to move fracked oil from the Bakken shale formation. The camp has swelled as thousands of people, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, have flocked to it from across North America. Over the past few weeks, the camp has held marches, occupations, and blockades — and they have been met with severe repression, including pepper spray and attack dogs.

quote:

Unprecedented alliances

What’s different today is that Indigenous peoples are connecting in a way that hasn’t been seen for generations. As the mobilization in North Dakota has ramped up, expressions of solidarity have been sweeping in, perhaps best exemplified by the Totem Pole Journey that stopped to show solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux on its way to its destination in Winnipeg.

Carved by the Lummi Nation, who recently fought off a coal export terminal in their territories in what is now Washington state, the totem pole was given as a sacred gift to Indigenous peoples in Treaty 1 territory fighting TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline....

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Enbridge set to take over most of B.C.'s gas pipelines

Enbridge, the company behind the controversial Northern Gateway oil sands pipeline project, is set to take over 55 per cent of B.C.'s gas pipelines as well as major gas processing plants.

As part of a merger with Houston-based Spectra announced Tuesday, Enbridge will also take over Spectra's stake in a major liquified natural gas export proposal.

The Westcoast Connector LNG project proposes piping gas across northern B.C. along a route similar to the one Enbridge Northern Gateway once mapped out to transport crude to oil tankers on B.C.'s North Coast....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Is Trudeau testing the waters for a Kinder Morgan approval?

In a column in Vancouver’s 24 Hours newspaper published online Monday afternoon, Bill Tieleman attributes his belief that Trudeau will approve the pipeline to “a more dispassionate look” at the circumstances and to past statements from government officials.

“The Liberals will point to their ‘balanced’ approach on the environment compared to the Conservatives and spend some political capital on Kinder Morgan, betting that after the initial fury dies down, they will not pay a high price.”

He sounds certain, doesn’t he?

Once could always be a hunch. But then this afternoon, the other shoe dropped.

According to my unreliable sources, Trudeau govt. will greenlight Kinder Morgan pipeline but Energy East will die a long slow death.

— Lawrence Martin (@LMartinOttawa) September 7, 2016

Lawrence Martin, a columnist for the Globe and Mail, has it from “unreliable sources” that Trudeau will “greenlight Kinder Morgan.”

Martin is known for good Liberal sources and wrote a two-volume biography of Jean Chrétien some years back. Tieleman is closer to the NDP, but it wouldn’t be a shock if he had a buddy or two on Trudeau’s team. He certainly has friends in Alberta’s NDP government.

quote:

If it is true that Trudeau plans to approve the pipeline, and Martin is also right that the trade-off is a long, slow death for Energy East, then clearly the Trudeau government has been rocked by recent scandals surrounding the National Energy Board process.

Today’s latest revelation that one of two embattled commissioners was found guilty of insider trading in 2014 simply adds to a fraught road for Energy East in Quebec. The conflict scandals coupled with disruptions at the Montreal hearings and renewed calls from local mayors and Indigenous peoples to shut down the process clearly left the government feeling that the problem they would sooner face is hostile residents and First Nations on British Columbia’s coast.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Town Halls

With the Federal Ministerial Panel deadline to voice concerns about the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion fast approaching, Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion (BROKE) has organized two more town halls on Sept. 21 and Sept. 28, for residents to learn about the risks associated with the project.

We only have until September 30 to voice our concerns to the Ministerial Panel examining the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project.

That’s why we’re bringing experts together - to help ensure that every Burnaby resident has the best information available to formulate their comments. It’s really important that anyone who hasn’t yet commented, submits their comments as soon as possible, as we anticipate the Federal Government's decision on the project by the end of the year.

Town Hall #1:

September 21 @ 7pm
Forest Grove Elementary School
8525 Forest Grove Drive, Burnaby - Unceded Coast Salish Territory.
Guest Speakers:
• Tsleil-Waututh Nation: traditional welcome
• Robyn Allan - Canadian economist, former CEO of ICBC and expert witness at the Northern Gateway Hearings
• Rueben George - Tsleil-Waututh Nation
• Music by Holly Arntzen

Town Hall #2: Facebook Event Here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1365468703482682/

September 28 @ 6:45pm
Firefighters Banquet & Conference Centre
6515 Bonsor Ave., Burnaby - Unceded Coast Salish Territory
Guest Speakers:
• Audrey Siegl - Musqueam Nation: traditional welcome
• Seth Klein - Director, BC Office, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
• Kate Hodgson - formerly with Kids for Climate Action, now UBC student fighting for divestment from fossil fuels
• City of Burnaby joint presentation with Dipak Dattani - Assistant Director Engineering and Chris Bowcock - Deputy Fire Chief
• Music by Holly Arntzen

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..a discussion on the pipelines. first nations not mentioned once.

At Issue | Leadership battles

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

epaulo13 wrote:

..a discussion on the pipelines. first nations not mentioned once.

At Issue | Leadership battles

But remember the CBC isn't biased coverage. If you listen to these people they set the context of the issues in a way that is the pro-business and totally ignores the environment and First Nations rights.  

I do agree with the Ottawa bureau chief that the tradeoff for releasing the Canadians from a Chinese prison was that Trudeau the Lesser said they would be okaying Kinder Morgan.

quizzical

kropotkin1951 wrote:
epaulo13 wrote:
..a discussion on the pipelines. first nations not mentioned once.

At Issue | Leadership battles

But remember the CBC isn't biased coverage. If you listen to these people they set the context of the issues in a way that is the pro-business and totally ignores the environment and First Nations rights.  

I do agree with the Ottawa bureau chief that the tradeoff for releasing the Canadians from a Chinese prison was that Trudeau the Lesser said they would be okaying Kinder Morgan.

i don't.

they've been stock piling pipe for a good long time now. long long before Justin's trip to China. maybe he signed the legal papers but the Transmountain reality was in place long ago.

Pondering

Trudeau has stated that it is up to oil companies to get social licence. I don't see Burnaby letting it go through. I could see cabinet approving it with the caveat that they have to gain community support.

mark_alfred

Various news sources are treating Kinder Morgan as a given.  Here's an article about the relatively sparse accomplishments of the Trudeau Liberals (from Althia Raj, which is surprising given that she's normally a cheerleader for this government):  http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/09/17/justin-trudeau-least-productive_...

From it:

Quote:
The minister didn’t note it, but the Liberals are expected to bring forward a climate change and clean growth agreement to the Commons this fall that will take into account pipeline expansions — and the likely approval of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

Trudeau has stated that it is up to oil companies to get social licence. I don't see Burnaby letting it go through. I could see cabinet approving it with the caveat that they have to gain community support.

Well go ahead and believe him if you like. He is a lying asshole that has many gullible people believing his image over his actions or lack therof. Here is the real reality of Trudeau's committment to the environment. Liberals always lie to get power and then like the Conservatives do what the business elite want because that is who they represent.  

The Liberals have ruled this country for much of the last century without a significant number of seats in BC. That has been factored into the equation.

Quote:

Federal Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna finally admitted the painfully obvious on Sunday.

She acknowledged the Trudeau Liberals are not going to toughen Stephen Harper’s targets for reducing industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions linked to climate change.

This means that after years spent in opposition attacking as inadequate Harper’s targets of lowering GHG emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, and to 30% by 2030, the Liberals are adopting them.

McKenna herself said after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appointed her climate change minister following last year’s election that Harper’s targets were a “floor” on which the Liberals wanted to improve.

In conceding the Conservative floor has now become the Liberal ceiling in an interview with Evan Solomon on CTV’s Question Period, McKenna blamed the Harper government for doing nothing to implement its targets for the 10 years it was in power, describing them as “fake.”

In the real world, when it comes to fake targets on climate change, the Liberals are the masters.

http://www.torontosun.com/2016/09/18/trudeau-adopts-harpers-climate-targets

quizzical

Pondering wrote:
Trudeau has stated that it is up to oil companies to get social licence. I don't see Burnaby letting it go through. I could see cabinet approving it with the caveat that they have to gain community support.

kinder-morgan is not a oil company. it's a transmission company carrying oil companies products.

it's not up to Burnaby.

community support for larger distance happened long ago.

Pondering

quizzical wrote:

Pondering wrote:
Trudeau has stated that it is up to oil companies to get social licence. I don't see Burnaby letting it go through. I could see cabinet approving it with the caveat that they have to gain community support.

kinder-morgan is not a oil company. it's a transmission company carrying oil companies products.

it's not up to Burnaby.

community support for larger distance happened long ago.

Social licence is needed to get pipelines through and Trudeau said it was up to the companies concerned to obtain social licence. What that translates to I have no idea.

The only community support needed is the communities directly impacted by the pipelines and shipping facilities.

Burnaby, from what I have heard, is majority against the pipeline. While legally I believe you are correct and that the federal government can approve it without regard for local wishes. In practice that is no longer so if the opposition is strong.

Liberals want support in Alberta and Saskatchewan but not at the expense of support in BC, Ontario and Quebec.

There is no way everyone will be satisfied on this file. No matter what Trudeau does people will be angry so his task is to minimize that anger and make it difficult for the losing side to blame him.

I can't say that I am familiar with the people of Burnaby but they seem very determined to stop the pipeline and the terminal expansion. The mayor is on the side of the people who are opposed. I believe the RCMP is active in BC so they could be called in to arrest protesters but if enough people show up it will be difficult to continue arresting them not to mention the issue of indigenous peoples on their own land.

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2016/08/10/news/kinder-morgan-expansion-...

The pipeline expansion is officially opposed by a several B.C. municipalities and at least 17 individual First Nations whose unceded territory it would cross.

How would you justify forcing pipelines through indigenous lands? The oil industry has proven there is no such thing as a leakproof pipeline (that they are willing to pay for).

There is no way you can argue that pipelines are safe therefore they do pose a serious and severe risk to the environment. Alberta cannot impose that risk on the rest of Canada. It is not unreasonable for us to refuse leaky pipelines full of bitumen.

Quebec is in for another battle too. The Liberals have tried to slide Bill 106 through which would allow for oil exploration in Quebec. I am against that too, not just pipelines. Quebec does not need oil. There is plenty of cheap oil available for our refineries. We need to invest in other industries not in fossil fuels.

The reason people support activists instead of the oil industry when it comes to pipelines is entirely the fault of the oil industry. If they had been responsible in the first place activists would have a much more difficult time stopping pipelines.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i did notice the business framing in that at issue report krop. and i agree also re the km pipeline..most certainly after the neb hearings in que. quizzical i still don't believe the km pipeline to be Inevitable and here's why.

..the wild card continues to be the first peoples. it always has been. today harper has shit on his face because of this wild card. and the libs, both federal and provincial aren’t any smarter.  just look at the gaffes they’ve been making in trying to imlement their programs. i believe in this realm all the popularity in the world has little meaning so trudeau can’t depend on that to get him through. and it won’t impact the courts either.

..the tsleil-waututh first nation continues to stand in the way. recently they lost a court decision but that was expected which is why they filed a second claim not so long ago, that tightened the language. and even this second claim, according to reuben george, is not  their big gun. they still have land right claims waiting in the wings. and as in the case of the northern gateway the latest fort nelson court decison re a water license..failing to consult again plays a major role.   

..on a bigger picture i believe the totem pole journey was quite a significant event in bringing many forces together. today we see the struggle over the dakota pipelines reaching a global scale with demos as far away as japan and new zeland. it’s not just happening on the ground in north dakota..there was an occupation in washington dc and the blocking of streets  in pittsburgh.

..this struggle is just warming up because the alternative is to dark to allow. this is the line in the sand.

quizzical

Pondering wrote:
quizzical wrote:
Pondering wrote:
Trudeau has stated that it is up to oil companies to get social licence. I don't see Burnaby letting it go through. I could see cabinet approving it with the caveat that they have to gain community support.

kinder-morgan is not a oil company. it's a transmission company carrying oil companies products.

it's not up to Burnaby.

community support for larger distance happened long ago.

Social licence is needed to get pipelines through and Trudeau said it was up to the companies concerned to obtain social licence. What that translates to I have no idea.

The only community support needed is the communities directly impacted by the pipelines and shipping facilities.

yup! they've got the support to build the pipeline to Burnaby already.

Quote:
Burnaby, from what I have heard, is majority against the pipeline. While legally I believe you are correct and that the federal government can approve it without regard for local wishes. In practice that is no longer so if the opposition is strong.

as i said above they've the social license to build the pipeline to Burnaby's boundry. can the people of Burnaby stop it? i doubt it. 10's of thousands would have to come out.

Quote:
Liberals want support in Alberta and Saskatchewan but not at the expense of support in BC, Ontario and Quebec.

it will be a trade off. i betcha they've crunched the numbers and they've more to gain than lose going through. which is why i agree with your next comment below.

Quote:
There is no way everyone will be satisfied on this file. No matter what Trudeau does people will be angry so his task is to minimize that anger and make it difficult for the losing side to blame him.

from here to Burnaby no one will be angry with the Liberals for building it. Burnaby and past may be but they don't vote Liberal anyway.

Quote:
the issue of indigenous peoples on their own land.

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2016/08/10/news/kinder-morgan-expansion-...

The pipeline expansion is officially opposed by a several B.C. municipalities and at least 17 individual First Nations whose unceded territory it would cross.

How would you justify forcing pipelines through indigenous lands? The oil industry has proven there is no such thing as a leakproof pipeline (that they are willing to pay for).

i don't know how many FN's whose territory it will cross who are against it. there could be 17 the article only said there was with no list. but i know the primary one with the largest unceded territory it crosses is for it. 160 protestors aren't going to stop it.

Quote:
There is no way you can argue that pipelines are safe therefore they do pose a serious and severe risk to the environment. Alberta cannot impose that risk on the rest of Canada. It is not unreasonable for us to refuse leaky pipelines full of bitumen.

there's no way to safely transport it if you want to argue from this position. it's not unreasonable to argue tanker truck and huge trains full of tankers are aren't safe too. which one is better?

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The reason people support activists instead of the oil industry when it comes to pipelines is entirely the fault of the oil industry. If they had been responsible in the first place activists would have a much more difficult time stopping pipelines.

could be argued they've been and are being responsible. the Transmountain pipeline has gone through here for over 50 years with no leaks or spills to speak of. try doing an internet search on tanker truck spills in BC and you'll see it's not safe too. again which one is better?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..it's not only bby that opposes the pipeline it's vancouver as well as new west. the threat that tankers pose further expands the resistance to most of the west coast including van island, gulf islands and many in the state of washington.

..this represents no social license big time.

quizzical

i'm not fully in disagreement with you epaulo. i just see it differently.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i understand quizzical and hold no animosity for your views.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

The problem with the pipelines, especially Kinder Morgan, is that it is being built for exporting tar sands gunk not feeding the domestic market. We are on the verge of putting the West Coast tourist industry in jeopardy to satisfy corporate greed not Canadian energy needs.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

The problem with the pipelines, especially Kinder Morgan, is that it is being built for exporting tar sands gunk not feeding the domestic market. We are on the verge of putting the West Coast tourist industry in jeopardy to satisfy corporate greed not Canadian energy needs.

..and to add a bit more we are promised honest evaluations and a say in the matter. instead find we are being bamboozled by totally corrupt processes

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Tugs will ensure tanker safety in Vancouver harbour, NEB told

During the National Energy Board hearings into the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, fears were raised about the risks of oil-tanker accidents.

The City of Vancouver warned that a major oil spill would cause up to $3-billion in damages by crippling tourism and destroying its brand as a green paradise. The difficulty of cleaning up a bitumen spill, which could take years if the heavy oil sinks only to wash ashore later, and the damage to fish, birds and marine mammals were also concerns.

But Trans Mountain won the support of the NEB panel, which granted conditional approval last May, by promising a safety plan “well above globally accepted shipping standards.” A federal panel is now reviewing the $6.8-billion proposal and Ottawa is expected to make a final decision in December.

quote:

The tug Manson, towing two barges in Georgia Strait in 2004, vanished with its two-man crew shortly after reporting steering problems. Rescuers found the barges drifting free and a small oil slick on the surface, but the tug and those aboard were gone. Investigators think that when the crew went below to investigate mechanical problems, the drifting barges violently snapped the tow line tight, sinking the tug.

The bulk carrier Pacific Dolphin was being escorted by two tugs, Seaspan Falcon and Seaspan Hawk, when it ran aground in the harbour near Port Moody in 1998. Under the guidance of a B.C. Coast Pilot, the ship was being moved to a terminal when it began to swing with the tide. The Seaspan Falcon couldn’t stop it and the tug was driven aground. Then, the Pacific Dolphin shuddered. The ship’s double hull was “indented and the associated frames, stiffeners and floors were distorted,” but there was no leakage. So it was a close call, but not an oil spill.

In 2009, the tug North Arm Venture was pulling a barge loaded with 370,156 litres of diesel and gasoline when the tow veered to starboard in Sechelt Inlet. TSB investigators said the skipper tried to control the barge, but it overtook the vessel and forced it to capsize. The crew escaped. The drifting, oil-laden barge was saved from the rocks only because a second tug was nearby and raced to the rescue.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Crude Oil Pipeline Leaks on the Rise in BC

Crude oil spills from pipelines regulated by the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission appear to have been increasing over the past five years, says NDP energy and mines critic Doug Donaldson.

“We know there’s risk in moving oil,” Donaldson said. “The trend does appear to be edging upwards, which is always a concern.”

There were seven spills in 2015 from the 2,489 kilometres of crude oil pipeline under the commission’s jurisdiction, according to a summary report quietly released earlier in the summer. That was the same number of spills as in 2014, but up from four in 2013, six in 2012 and three in 2011.

Kai Nagata, energy and democracy director with the Dogwood Initiative environmental group, said the increase contradicts industry claims.

“The industry story is that safety is getting better and better, and the data don’t bear that out,” he said.

quote:

No details on size of spills

The summary report does not specify where the incidents occurred or how much oil was spilled. The commission spokesman said he could not immediately provide the incident reports with those details.

The commission normally shows the location of spills on an incident map on its website, similar to the one the National Energy Board provides for pipelines under its jurisdiction, but the map is currently unavailable.

The spokesperson said it was taken down at the end of June for maintenance and is expected to be back up, with improvements, by the end of the year.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Ottawa won't appeal court decision blocking Northern Gateway pipeline

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr won't appeal a recent court decision that overturned the former Harper government's approval of the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline project.

Earlier Tuesday, Northern Gateway also said it wouldn't pursue an appeal.

"We're not appealing the decision, because we understand what the court has said," Carr told reporters ahead of question period on Tuesday.

quote;

"Certainly, for those nations, such as our clients, who have opposed Northern Gateway consistently, they would prefer to see the oil tanker moratorium finalized by the federal government and take this toxic project off the table," Gavin Smith, an environment lawyer who represents some of eight First Nations part of this case, said in an interview. "It's been draining their time for many years."

"They have been very clear that, according to their own laws and jurisdictions, they will not permit Northern Gateway to go through their territories," he said.

The Liberal Party proposed a moratorium on oil tankers along B.C.'s northern coast during the last election, but the details of such a ban have not yet been finalized.

Carr wouldn't tip his hand as to whether the government will opt for this approach, but said a decision is imminent.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Montreal woman surprises Justin Trudeau with serious question in New York

A friendly greeting for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in New York quickly turned into inconvenient images of a hasty retreat on Tuesday evening after a Montreal woman surprised him with a loaded question.

"Prime Minister, I'm Canadian, I'm from Montreal. It's nice to meet you," said Alex Dahlberg, 22, initiating the exchange as Trudeau walked by, surrounded by a security detail and staffers.

Her greeting instantly drew a warm smile and a handshake from the Canadian politician, who represents a Montreal riding in Canada's Parliament.

"Oh, a pleasure," he said.

But the pleasantries ended after the Montrealer asked Trudeau about a British Columbia oil pipeline project, proposed by Texas-based company, Kinder Morgan.

"Will you reject the Kinder Morgan pipeline?" asked Dahlberg, who is pursuing a degree in environmental studies with a minor in environmental biology at New York University.

That's when the prime minister's smile faded and he started to walk away, saying something about wanting a "proper process." Dahlberg politely thanked Trudeau for stopping, saying it was an honour to meet him.

The entire exchange was conveniently captured on video and posted by 350 Action, a U.S. climate change activist group named after what is considered by many scientists to be a desirable target for greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The images highlighted the difficult political choice facing Trudeau's government, which is still in its first year in office....

mark_alfred

Quote:
The entire exchange was conveniently captured on video and posted by 350 Action

Where's the video?  I checked the 350 Action site but couldn't find it.  And I didn't see a link to it in the National Observer article.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..here's a very important analysis on the km pipeline. among other things it lays out very clearly why municipalities are against km. for those in favour these are some of the issues that they need to address.

Robyn Allan speaks about the economic case against Transmountain that the NEB refused to consider

Robyn Allan speaks at BROKE town hall on September 21, 2016

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Opponents of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain expansion project wait for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at the Kitsilano Coast Guard Station in Vancouver, B.C. on Sun. Sept. 25, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

What whale experts are saying about the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project

I believe the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion would be a death sentence for our iconic Southern Resident orcas, so I contacted a handful of the world’s top orca experts from outside of Canada to ask what they’d like to tell our government. What were their thoughts on Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline, which would triple the capacity of the existing pipeline from Edmonton to Burnaby to ship oil to the U.S. and Asia? Their short answer, summed up in one hashtag: #STOPKM

​Here's what they've said about the impact of the expanded pipeline and tanker traffic increase through orca habitat:

"The presence of a massive oil terminal in Vancouver poses a real threat to the long-term survival of the Southern Resident killer whales. First of all, adding 400 oil tankers a year in Haro Strait will add massively to the noise that is already making life difficult for killer whales dependent on quiet oceans to effectively seek their prey. But next, and perhaps most harrowing, is the prospect of outright extinction if any single one of these tankers should ever go astray in these not-easily-navigated waters and run aground, because dilbit (diluted bitumen) is not ordinary oil.

Americans are praying and hoping that their Canadian counterparts show enough good sense not to heed the call of greed by running a fleet of oil tankers through the sensitive habitat of numerous endangered species, the most spectacular of which is the killer whale (orca). Please, please, please: Do the right thing.”

- David Neiwert, author of Orcas and Men: What Killer Whales Can Teach Us

mark_alfred
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

 BC Mayors Call on Federal Government to Reject Kinder Morgan Pipeline

The mayors of Victoria, Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Squamish, Bowen Island, Sooke and Chief Don Tom of the Tsartlip Nation have joined together to ask the federal government not to approve the Kinder Morgan pipeline in December. Today at 11:45am in the lobby of the Victoria Conference Centre (Douglas St entrance) the mayors and their allies held a press conference.

The mayors believe that the National Energy Board (NEB) review and subsequent Ministerial Panel process have both been fundamentally flawed, and are calling for the project to be put on hold until an adequate assessment has been completed.

The Ministerial Panel appointed by the federal government to gather additional input on the Kinder Morgan project did not address the gaps in the previous NEB review, and was discredited by a string of failures of its own. The federal government is therefore basing its impending decision on inadequate information, gathered by two discredited review processes, without ever having held a formal public hearing....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Pipelines being driven by private equity firms through ratings agency they now own

You may have caught the Sept. 12 headline in the Globe and Mail, the Edmonton Journal, etc: “Canada needs new energy pipelines, bond rating agency says.”

A new report from DBRS, Canada’s credit ratings agency (CRA), says Kinder Morgan’s TransMountain pipeline expansion, Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline, and TransCanada Corp’s Energy East pipeline are all necessary, but, as the Edmonton Journal put it, the “strong political, environmental and regulatory opposition” to these projects throws “a big question mark over Canada’s energy future,” the report says.

Ratings agency bought by private equity firms

DBRS is Canada’s (small) equivalent to the big three CRAs: Moody’s, Standard & Poors (S&P), and Fitch, which wield enormous power around the world by granting or downgrading the Triple-A ratings of companies, countries, and governments. The threat of a downgrade by a CRA can create scary media stories, especially if the target is a local government.

In December 2014, DBRS was bought up by two huge private equity firms – Carlyle Group LP and Warburg Pincus LLC. Both invest billions in energy projects around the world.

quote:

Prentice delivers message for private equity firms

Fast-forward to September 12, 2016 and the new DBRS report, stating: “If pipeline infrastructure is not built, Canada’s energy sector increasingly risks the eventual loss of global market share” and “could eventually see their credit ratings change without more overseas access…”

The next day, September 13, Bloomberg reported that PM Justin Trudeau is said to be favouring Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion, but former Alberta premier Jim Prentice “warned Kinder Morgan’s project alone won’t be enough.”

Bloomberg quoted Prentice:

‘We need pipelines, we need pipelines to the West Coast, and most advantageous for Canada of course are pipelines into the Asia-Pacific basin and Trans Mountain would certainly be helpful,’ Prentice, a Calgary-based adviser in the energy group at Warburg Pincus, said Tuesday at the Bloomberg Canadian Fixed Income Conference in New York.

The Bloomberg quote from Prentice continued:

“‘But we also need to bear in mind that Trans Mountain won’t solve the problem,’ because tankers that can navigate the region are too small to service Asia, he said.  Canada needs an energy port that can ship up to two million barrels per day to Asia, Prentice said, and Canadians should be concerned that investors are cooling to the country’s oil patch. ‘The concern that really should alarm us as Canadians is low-cost capital is exiting the Canadian basin,’ he said.”

So Warburg Pincus adviser Jim Prentice is endorsing the views of DBRS, owned by Warburg Pincus and the Carlyle Group, which have billions they want to loan to governments for investment in infrastructure. Prentice had earlier been a paid advisor for Enbridge in 2014, helping the company negotiate with First Nations opposed to Northern Gateway....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

B.C.'s Clark urged to reject Kinder Morgan pipeline for failing key condition

British Columbia Premier Christy Clark is being challenged to reject Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposal because it can never meet one of her five conditions to support oil pipeline development.

More than 30 environmental, social and aboriginal groups from across Canada have sent a letter to Clark that reminds her that one of B.C.'s conditions for pipeline support includes assurances of a world-leading oil-spill response.

The groups say a study from the National Academy of Science concludes that oil containing diluted bitumen acts differently than other types of crude when spilled.

The study warns diluted bitumen sinks in water and there is no known way to clean up heavy oils that settle to the bottom of oceans, lakes or rivers....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Why is the CEO of a big Canadian bank giving speeches about climate change and pipelines?

Royal Bank of Canada CEO David McKay made a few headlines last week when he offered his thoughts to the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce on the energy and climate challenges facing Canada. In his speech he called on the federal government to help get fossil fuel resources to market by approving new bitumen pipelines and other infrastructure. Doing so, he argued, is essential to the transition to a “cleaner economy.”

And it seems he has the ear of Catherine McKenna, federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change. The day after announcing her government’s approval of the controversial Pacific Northwest LNG project, she tweeted this nugget from McKay’s speech:

mckenna tweet

There is plenty to say about the content of the speech, which is a study in the new climate denialism – the idea that we can take effective action on climate change while at the same time ramping up oil and gas production and building new pipelines. But first, consider the source.

McKay hinted at what’s on the line for his company when he stated, “RBC [Royal Bank of Canada] has a big stake in Canada getting this right” and described RBC as “Canada’s leading energy bank, for conventional, non-conventional and renewable resources.”

Let’s get a little closer to full disclosure: the largest of Canada’s big banks, RBC has a very close relationship with the fossil fuel industry and a strong vested interest in its expansion....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

First Nation urges Trudeau to rush tanker ban after diesel spill in Great Bear Rainforest

First responders are working quickly to contain a diesel spill in British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest after a 10,000-tonne tanker barge and tug unit ran aground on the central Pacific coast around 1 a.m. on Thursday morning.

According to the region's Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre, the Nathan E. Stewart tug boat was hauling an empty fuel barge through the Seaforth Channel when both vessels crashed into Edge Reef near Athlone Island. The tug's seven-member crew was on board at the time of the accident, but no injuries have been reported so far and all have been safely evacuated.

Members of the Heiltsuk First Nation, who live in the community of Bella Bella near the crash site, immediately linked the accident to concerns about new pipeline projects and the current Liberal government's promise to implement a ban on tanker traffic on B.C.'s northern coast. They reported that the tug boat started to sink around 10 a.m., leaking thousands of litres of fuel into the Pacific Ocean.

“Though we are thankful that the barge was empty, we are gravely concerned about the potential ramifications of the fuel spill from the tug," said Heiltsuk Chief Marilyn Slett in a press statement.

"Our Gitga’at neighbours to the north are still unable to harvest clams and other seafoods ten years after the sinking of the Queen of the North. This spill area is in one of our primary breadbaskets, and we know that diesel is extremely difficult to recover.".....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..spills are imagined risks until they become reality. then it is a disaster.

Tug sinks near Bella Bella spilling 190,000 litres of diesel

An American tug pushing an empty fuel barge has sunk after running aground near Bella Bella.

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans says the tug Nathan E. Stewart hit ground on Edge Reef near Athlone Island just after 1 a.m. this morning.

Heiltsuk elected Chief Marilyn Slett says the tug sank completely just before 10 a.m., and that the Nation’s most recent estimate is that it has spilled more than 200,000 litres of fuel.

Slett says the area is environmentally sensitive, particularly for clam harvesting.

In a statement sent to CKNW Kirby’s incident commander confirmed the tug had a load of approximately 190,000 litres of diesel.

He says various response vessels, workboats, boom and oil skimmers have been deployed.

Cleanup delayed

In a statement, owners Texas-based Kirby Corporation says the seven crew members aboard have now been safely transferred to a coast guard vessel.

“Kirby Offshore Marine, owners and managers of the Nathan E. Stewart regret that this incident has occurred and are working to respond and mitigate the impact of this incident.”

It says Western Canada Marine Response Corporation has now dispatched vessels with 2,500 feet of boom and crew from a base in Prince Rupert, and that it has also contracted salvage specialists Resolve Marine Group.

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