Students Sent Home for Wearing "Islam is of the Devil" t-shirts to school

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Maysie Maysie's picture
Students Sent Home for Wearing "Islam is of the Devil" t-shirts to school

In Gainesville, Florida. 

Quote:

More children from the Dove World Outreach Center arrived Tuesday at area public schools with shirts bearing the message "Islam is of the Devil" and were sent home for violation of the school district's dress code when they declined to change clothes or cover the anti-Muslim statement on their clothing.chool district staff attorney Tom Wittmer said the shirts violated a district ban on clothing that may "disrupt the learning process" or cause other students to be "offended or distracted."

"Students have a right of free speech, and we have allowed students to come to school wearing clothes with messages," Wittmer said. "But this message is a divisive message that is likely to offend students. Principals, I feel reasonably, have deemed that a violation of the dress code."

....

On their front, the T-shirts had a verse from the Gospel of John: "Jesus answered I am the way and the truth and the life; no one goes to the Father except through me," and this statement, "I stand in trust with Dove Outreach Center." The message "Islam is of the Devil" is on the back of the shirt.

...

Dove Senior Pastor Terry Jones said no local company "had the guts" to print the shirts. Dove member Wayne Sapp said he then ordered the shirts over the Internet from a company that allows individuals to design their own shirts. His daughter, Faith Sapp , 10, was the Talbot Elementary student sent home Monday. She said she was allowed to wear the shirt to school on Tuesday -- with the Gospel message on the front visible but the anti-Islam message on the back covered.

Wayne Sapp's daughter, Emily Sapp, 15, was the student sent home from Gainesville High on Tuesday. Both Faith and Emily Sapp said it was their decision, not that of their parents, to wear the shirts to school in order to promote their Christian beliefs. Emily Sapp said the "Islam is of the Devil" statement was aimed at the religion's beliefs, not its members.

"The people are fine," she said. "The people are people. They can be saved like anyone else."

Link to full story here.

 

SparkyOne

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

Maysie Maysie's picture

It's a small comfort to me that I will never be referred to as "Dove Senior Pastor"

Sheesh.

Rexdale_Punjabi Rexdale_Punjabi's picture

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

really? How do u insult someone who never existed?

Michelle

That's what other parents should do.  Send their kids to school with "Jesus was just a guy, and he's dead now.  Get over it," on them.

al-Qa'bong

I wonder how many would turn the other cheek if someone wore a "Jesus Had it Coming" t-shirt.

Stargazer

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

 

Hahahaha. This made me laugh! Can you imagine the outrage. These wacky Xian types, for the most part, can dish it out but have no tolerance for actually taking the same shit they dish out. And how can a 10 year old already have these hard core views? Obviously her parents are working over time on getting the family Rapture Ready.

 

Starcrapper

Finally someone says what everyone is thinking.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

Make it "Fuck Jeezus", and I'm all for the sentiment. Intended only as an expression of encouragement for Mrs. Jeezus, of course.

Papal Bull

I once went to school in a shirt with canadian flag draped skulls on the front and i had the option of either changing shirts, putting it on inside out, or going home.

 

Like any quasi-intelligent teen, I took the latter option.

Ktown

Michelle wrote:

That's what other parents should do.  Send their kids to school with "Jesus was just a guy, and he's dead now.  Get over it," on them.

so others on this board, and maybe even you, would be ok with offending Christians but not Muslims?

Way to keep babble classy

 

Rexdale_Punjabi Rexdale_Punjabi's picture

Ktown wrote:

Michelle wrote:

That's what other parents should do.  Send their kids to school with "Jesus was just a guy, and he's dead now.  Get over it," on them.

so others on this board, and maybe even you, would be ok with offending Christians but not Muslims?

Way to keep babble classy   

Why Ty I try very hard u know do u like what we've done here?

 

edit- Real tip both are stupid and based off lies, and misconceptions

Weltschmerz

My t-shirt would read:

"The four-fold proof that Jesus was Jewish:

  1. He lived at home until he was 34
  2. He went straight into his father's line of work
  3. He thought his mother was a virgin
  4. His mother thought he was God"

Maysie Maysie's picture

Um, Weltschmertz, posting very old, not funny and stereotype-based jokes? Really?

Slumberjack

Ktown wrote:
so others on this board, and maybe even you, would be ok with offending Christians but not Muslims? Way to keep babble classy 

In the overall context of numerous discussions on religion, they've all had their turn at various times here.  There's just too many to deal with individually within the confines of 100 post thread limits.  Stay tuned though, because it is Ramadan now, and I might just have a few words later regarding involuntary belt tightening as an uninterested, but attached bystander.

Skinny Dipper

Most school boards and schools in Ontario have dress codes that deal with clothing that puts down other groups or individuals.  Any student who wears a shirt that expresses negative words or pictures towards a group or individual would be told to change their outfit.  There are also restrictions on wearing clothing that depicts alcohol, cigarettes, and drugs (legal or not).

I have not had to deal with students who have worn clothing that depict racist, sexist, or homophobic messages.  I do remind some of the older students that license plate shirts may have offensive messages.  I will give you one example: I H8 JUS.  Yes, one can hate juice.  But if anyone can interpret the message another way, then the message and shirt would be deemed inappropriate for the classroom.  I also would not accept FCUK (French Connection United Kingdom).  The full words, I would accept; the short form, I would not.  I did have to read a story to grade-one students about a duck that got a fire truck stuck in the muck.  I read that story really slowly!

Rexdale_Punjabi Rexdale_Punjabi's picture

lol ok I dont get no hassles lol yesterday I had a shirt wit legalize it n I was flagged up too shit was hangin out the left lol nobody said nothing b(exept shit cuzz u lookin good Smile wus craccin)

 

skinny lol u go far wtf is FCUK though

Skinny Dipper

FCUK is French Connection United Kingdom.  It's a clothing chain store.  Imagine a kindergarten student seeing FCUK.  Yes, four and five year olds do know how to unscramble letters.  They know the F word.  FCUK would disrupt the learning environment.

In reality, I have only had to deal with a couple of dress code violations.  It was usually by 12-14 year old girls who wore low-cut T-shirts.  It's when they started feeling uncomfortable when I was around them.  I had to deal with the situation.  In most cases, I contacted the office at recess to get a female staff member to deal with the offending students.  In one situation a female staff member came up to me and asked, "What seems to be the problem""

I stared at the female staff member and replied uncomfortably, "There's, uh, no problem."

Rexdale_Punjabi Rexdale_Punjabi's picture

umm no it wouldnt lol I had a gun in my hand bacc home when I was 7 yearz old a 4 or 5 year old seein fucc wont really do anything but make them laugh for 5 min which aint even a bad thing. And real talks what learning environment. Remember that as a person school proly affects you the least on that esp cuz msot of the time when ur younger you reject that shit and you learn how to behave from whats around u.

 

When ur from the hood, with a underfunded area period lol there's no learning environment except if you blacc, bumpin rap n see that cop with a gat cuzz run bacc.

 

Not gettin on you but ur proly one of thsoe teachers ppl dont like and they talk shit about them behind ur bacc. And lol Idk I cant see a teacher coming up to a girl here and telling her to go change the girl would cuss her out lol

 

Yo honestly ty for showing another perspective though It just shows you know that its a self-fullfilling prophecy in a way when ur held to a lower standard cuz most of the kids are only going to strive to meet that standard you know.

 

Like compare.

 

White Kid Why Dont you do ur homework

Mandem O their kindz of ppl dont do homework

 

White Kid Why were u away yesterday?

Mandem O u know how they are partying and selling drugs they were proly up to no good leave them be

 

White Kid WHY YOU PREGNANT?

Mandem ...

 

you know what im gettin at?

Weltschmerz

Maysie wrote:

Um, Weltschmertz, posting very old, not funny and stereotype-based jokes? Really?

You obviously haven't done Passover with my in-laws.  There is no such thing as "too old" when it comes to Jewish humour.  The reading of the Haggadah is peppered with bad old jokes.  Keeps things lively.

No offense was intended.

Star Spangled C...

This Jew loves a good Jewish joke, personally.

Maysie Maysie's picture

Let's stay on topic please.

al-Qa'bong

We were, until you got all huffy at Weltschmerz and threw things off.

Makwa Makwa's picture

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

mahmud

Makwa wrote:

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

Ditto.

 

mahmud

Makwa wrote:

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

Ditto.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

You only get one vote, mahmud.

Rexdale_Punjabi Rexdale_Punjabi's picture

Makwa wrote:

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

I always believed the opposite lol

Weltschmerz

Makwa wrote:

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

I've always been against uniforms, but I admit my reaction is more an emotional than intellectual one.  So I'd be interested to hear the reasons behind this belief.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Rexdale_Punjabi wrote:

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

really? How do u insult someone who never existed?

For that matter, how do you fuck him?

Weltschmerz

Ken Burch wrote:

Rexdale_Punjabi wrote:

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

really? How do u insult someone who never existed?

For that matter, how do you fuck him?

Metaphysically?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Weltschmerz wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Rexdale_Punjabi wrote:

SparkyOne wrote:

Oh free speech.

I wonder if students wore a shirt saying fuck jesus if they would get sent home or thy would be pat on the head for expressing free speech.

really? How do u insult someone who never existed?

For that matter, how do you fuck him?

Metaphysically?

Would you need to use a conundrum?

Call me Dave

Free speech...  now there is something that has been in the news lately!

I suppose these folks have every right to make up t-shirts that say "Islam is from the Devil", and I would also support the right of people to print offensive things about Christians., I am a big proponant of freedom of expression. 

I fully support the school on this one though, rules need to be set in order to keep the learning environment orderly and comfortable for everyone. 

I fail to understand what Dove Outreach is trying to accomplish with this particular campaign though.  Any message delivered harshly and unlovingly is bound to fail and this one is definately designed to start Christian vs Muslim death match!  The pastor there needs to give his head a shake!

Makwa Makwa's picture

Weltschmerz wrote:

I've always been against uniforms, but I admit my reaction is more an emotional than intellectual one.  So I'd be interested to hear the reasons behind this belief.

The so called 'freedom' to wear ones private choice of clothing while participating in an institutional setting is merely a means whereby the more elite can demonstrate class status, and while the majority are sucked into opressive, objectified so-called 'fashion' demonstrations.  It is the source of great pressure on parents of limited means to supply children with expensive, developing world produced commodities, as well as the source of great unhappiness in young people who can't fit with current style 'choices'.  Morover, one should wear ones 'transgressive' apparel appropriately in ones neighbourhood.  Most of youth so-called 'style' is capitalist commodified, developing world exploitative bullshit, and rarely truly reflects our genuine histories and cultures.  Uniform is a freedom from such commodification, and at best, a positive identification with an institution which should be embraced and celebrated by those who participate.

PS: I should come clean - I hated fashion trends so much in high school, I eventually took to wearing a tie, vest, dress pants and shoes, leather trenchcoat and fedora. Perhaps I wanted to challenge the popular image of aboriginal youth. Needless to say, I had few friends.  Make of it as you will.

Call me Dave

Unfortunately, uniforms from the school are often quite a bit more expensive than clothes from the local big box store... 

A uniform policy might make it even more difficult for low income parents to cope.  Especially the first year before any used uniforms become available.

 

Makwa Makwa's picture

Call me Dave wrote:

Unfortunately, uniforms from the school are often quite a bit more expensive than clothes from the local big box store... 

A uniform policy might make it even more difficult for low income parents to cope.  Especially the first year before any used uniforms become available.

 

As parents from the UK and Jamaica have observed to me, a set of two to four uniforms is much cheaper than a year's worth of popular clothing, and seconds or public school discounts are almost always available.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

Makwa wrote:

PS: I should come clean - I hated fashion trends so much in high school, I eventually took to wearing a tie, vest, dress pants and shoes, leather trenchcoat and fedora. Perhaps I wanted to challenge the popular image of aboriginal youth. Needless to say, I had few friends.  Make of it as you will.

What I make of it is a strong personal sense of fashion, you old clotheshorse, you.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Makwa wrote:

Weltschmerz wrote:

I've always been against uniforms, but I admit my reaction is more an emotional than intellectual one.  So I'd be interested to hear the reasons behind this belief.

The so called 'freedom' to wear ones private choice of clothing while participating in an institutional setting is merely a means whereby the more elite can demonstrate class status, and while the majority are sucked into opressive, objectified so-called 'fashion' demonstrations.  It is the source of great pressure on parents of limited means to supply children with expensive, developing world produced commodities, as well as the source of great unhappiness in young people who can't fit with current style 'choices'.  Morover, one should wear ones 'transgressive' apparel appropriately in ones neighbourhood.  Most of youth so-called 'style' is capitalist commodified, developing world exploitative bullshit, and rarely truly reflects our genuine histories and cultures.  Uniform is a freedom from such commodification, and at best, a positive identification with an institution which should be embraced and celebrated by those who participate.

PS: I should come clean - I hated fashion trends so much in high school, I eventually took to wearing a tie, vest, dress pants and shoes, leather trenchcoat and fedora. Perhaps I wanted to challenge the popular image of aboriginal youth. Needless to say, I had few friends.  Make of it as you will.

What would you say to the argument that uniforms stifle creativity and individuality(and, in many school systems, are required for precisely that purpose)?  Is it possible to dress exactly like everyone else and still be yourself?

In asking this question, I mean no attack on your decision to dress as you did, Makwa.  I respect that choice.  But that's the opposite of having to wear a uniform.

Pogo Pogo's picture

I vote for uniforms.  If I have to choose geographically, Ontario first.

Weltschmerz

I have never been one for the popular styles, and much of my clothing growing up was hand-me-downs from my brother.  In later high school, I discovered thrift stores, and started buying the bulk of my clothes (including my prom outfit) from there.  Like you Makwa, I arleady knew I didn't fit in, so I decided my clothing would be a statement (of rebellion if not celebration) rather than trying to fit in and failing.

My son's going into Grade 4, and we've already encountered the peer pressure for the "cool" clothes.  Currently, we have no problem simply saying "That's nice.  No, you can't have that."  We'll see if my perception changes as my son progresses through school.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Makwa wrote:

The so called 'freedom' to wear ones private choice of clothing while participating in an institutional setting is merely a means whereby the more elite can demonstrate class status, and while the majority are sucked into opressive, objectified so-called 'fashion' demonstrations.

So you would eliminate this "so-called freedom" by dictating to everyone how they will dress.

Quote:
It is the source of great pressure on parents of limited means to supply children with expensive, developing world produced commodities, as well as the source of great unhappiness in young people who can't fit with current style 'choices'.

School uniforms are also often expensive and made in the "developing world". They cause great unhappiness in young people who can't wear clothing that is in keeping with their cultural or religious heritage.

Quote:
Most of youth so-called 'style' is capitalist commodified, developing world exploitative bullshit, and rarely truly reflects our genuine histories and cultures. Uniform is a freedom from such commodification, and at best, a positive identification with an institution which should be embraced and celebrated by those who participate.

Yeah, the good ol' school uniform really reflects our histories and cultures, frees us from commodification, and allows us to proudly embrace and celebrate that wonderful alma mater that stands as a bulwark against capitalist commodification, enforced conformity, and the exploitation of the developing world.

On which planet?

Makwa Makwa's picture

In my experience, school uniforms are usually locally made, as they tend to be of specialized design. In fact, I recall one factory on Adelaide near Spadina.  I don`t know if it is still in operation, but it seemed pretty busy a few years ago.  The 'history' is generally developed within the institutional history, thus perhaps reflects the dominant political culture.  I can accept that, given the alternative submission to capitalist trends.  I happen to embrace the ideal of "alma mater", and scholarly culture and pursuit, and wish that more young people would take pride in their institutional academic achievement, particularly among FN and POC.  The 'freedom' to capitulate to capitalist branding and fake commodified rebellion doesn't interest me. Freedom is in the mind, not the low cut tee or jeans or the brand on your t-shirt. Modification can be incorporated for religious or cultural design, such as a head scarf which could reflect school colours.

mahmoud

Makwa wrote:

I have always believed that all public schools in Ontario should have uniforms.

 

agreed, and no religious attire, such as burkas and head caps

anything that could be  a distraction to learning and cause segregation is bad