NB NDP Leader Suggests Talks with Liberals

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David Hackett
NB NDP Leader Suggests Talks with Liberals

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/05/05/nb-ndp-libe...

 

"New Brunswick's Liberals and New Democrats should consider greater co-operation between the parties to push forward policies of common interest, NDP Leader Dominic Cardy said Thursday.

Cardy, who became the province's NDP leader in March, said during CBC New Brunswick's weekly political panel that the two parties should consider looking beyond the traditional party structures.

NDP Leader Dominic Cardy said his party and the Liberals should discuss ways to co-operate on issues they both want to see become laws. (CBC)"What I'd like to see is a discussion that could lead to something in the form of a larger meeting … among progressive voters in New Brunswick in the next year or so," Cardy said."  <Click Link for the rest>

 

 

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David Hackett

This is a really BAD idea.  Depite what you think of merging Federal parties, the NB Liberals are still viewed as largely corrupt at worst and untrustworthy at best.  They will be radioactive for quite some time after Graham's tenure and offering to throw in with them so soon is a serious problem.  Very disappointed.

1springgarden

Agree, bad idea. Cardy needs to show he wants the NDP to compete in New Brunswick, not try and cut clever deals with the Liberals.  The NDP does not have one seat in the NB legislature so by default Cardy must lead an extra-parliamentary fightback against the neo-liberal austerity in New Brunswick, fight for low income New Brunswickers, fight for public services, fight for something.

It has been one month since Cardy was acclaimed leader of the NB NDP.  It's never a good sign when the party membership don't get to vote to select the leader because the leader doesn't have to demonstrate that they can do battle.

Tommy_Paine

What an idiot.

Stockholm

I'm not sure what the problem is and i think a couple of people are reading wayyyy more into what Cardy said than I think was intended. The fact is the NB NDP has no seats in the NB legislature while the Liberals have 11 - it makes sense for the two opposition parties to cooperate to some extent - that's what parties do - note that the federal NDP just did fantastically well by being the only party that said "let's work together" and was opening willing to work with other parties. Th Liberals who insisted on rejecting any coalition or any cooperation with the NDP were destroyed and the obstructionist BQ was annhilated.

The federal NDP just won 30% of the vote in New Brunswick and finished ahead of the Liberals in 7 out of 10 ridings. I think that there is a great opportunity for the provincial party and one part of that process is to try to build up a progressive alternative to the new Tory government. If there are some NB Liberals who recognize that their party is a dead brand and want to get involved in creating a broader leftwing alternative - so much the better - the more the merrier!

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Stockholm wrote:

If there are some NB Liberals who recognize that their party is a dead brand and want to get involved in creating a broader leftwing alternative - so much the better - the more the merrier!

So the Liberals are supposed to re-brand themselves as what - New Democrats? - and form a government in the next election, and this will somehow mark a victory for the NDP?

The federal NDP did, as you say, keep chanting the "let's work together" mantra, but fortunately nobody took them up on it, and they ended up winning the official opposition position all on their own. I shudder to think what would have happened had they entered into an electoral coalition with, say the BQ or the Liberals.

Fidel

They might not have listened much to Jack's call for cooperation before the federal election. But that was then. A united front on the left is always a possibility. There needs to be a political will to do so and some actual lefties interested. It happened in Ontario more or less with Petersen's Liberals agreeing to an accord with Rae's NDP in the 1980s. It was a successful maneuver for a then opposition Liberal Party at the time.

KenS

I understand your point Stock that people MAY be reading in too much: Cardy did just say 'more cooperation would be good'.

But knowing Dominic, and knowing that he is well aware that is often the leading edge of an intention to move towards merger, I think clarification is called for here.

Stockholm

Well, two years ago the federal NDP was ready to go far beyond "cooperaton" with the Liberals - it was ready for a full-blown coalition. The Liberals refused - and today we have 103 seats and they have 34 - to the winners go the spoils!

KenS

True.

And the NDP not having any seats, its all good for increasing their credibility in NB. Which was something the 2008 Coalition did- even as a failure, and with the federal NDP less in need of sucha a basic boost than the NB NDP.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

The moral? Cosying up to the Liberals increases one's "credibility".

Who knew?

KenS

Not you I guess.

Credibility means that more than 1 or 2 % of the population believe you can accomplish anything. Not much of that when you have no seats in the leg. Which means potential supporters look to solutions from others that are their second choices, as far as affinity goes.

Caissa

I doubt Pierre Cyr would have suggested this line of action. Smile

David Hackett

@ KenS & Stockholm, 

    But the NB Liberals are quite different than the Federal Liberals and their brand is quite a bit more toxic, especially to progressive voters.  Liberals were punished heavily at the polls and it will take a while before people forget NB Power, Atcon, etc (something the NDP helped make sure of with our heavy criticism at the time).  For Cardy to turn around and offer his hand to them now, when there is no real benefit to the NDP will alienate those voters who are looking for a progressive alternative.  This will hurt more than it helps.

Caissa

Often, the NB Liberal party governs to the right of the NB PC party.

Stockholm

If there are progressive individuals who in the past have identified as Liberals in New Brunswick (for whatever inexplicable reason) and who want to build a new progressive force in NB under the NDP moniker then I say - the more the merrier. I agree that the Liberal brand is probably damaged beyond repair in NB - and that's way any progressive Liberals out there who only ever backed thre Liberals because they thought they could win - shoudl be welcomed into the NDP with open arms!

David Hackett

I don't have any problem bringing disaffected Liberals over to the fold, I'm objecting to affiliating with the actual Liberal Party itself.

Caissa

Although, the Liberal brand is damaged goods in NB, I am not willing to sound its death-knell yet. NBers have a history of voting for parties which their great-great grandparents suported.

Stockholm

David Hackett wrote:
I don't have any problem bringing disaffected Liberals over to the fold, I'm objecting to affiliating with the actual Liberal Party itself.

When someone suggests disbanding the NDP in New Brunswick and "affiliating" with the NB Liberals - let us know.

Caissa

The provincial NDP is usually seen as "quaint" in NB. It's a long 3.5 years until the next provincial election. Anything can happen in that time.

Anonymouse

This reminds me of when Jack Layton courted Sheila Copps. An election later the NDP took all the Hamilton seats and several former Liberal staffers. A merger is just not gonna happen, for many of the reasons listed above

Pierre C yr

I havent written to Dominic on this yet... On the one hand the liberal brand seems obviously too damaged to want to associate with. On the other the disintegration of the liberal party might bring back the progressive wing to dominance provincially even in the face of 2 somewhat progressive failed leaders at the federal level. It was once the party of Louis J Robichaud before it was the party of McKenna and Graham. But I feel closer to the red tories here than liberals in this province. From the pot smoking Hatfield to former NDP student Bernard Lord. Tho so far Alward is a bit of a dissapointment.

NB is a hard place to do politics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aristotleded24

Stockholm wrote:
I'm not sure what the problem is and i think a couple of people are reading wayyyy more into what Cardy said than I think was intended. The fact is the NB NDP has no seats in the NB legislature while the Liberals have 11 - it makes sense for the two opposition parties to cooperate to some extent - that's what parties do - note that the federal NDP just did fantastically well by being the only party that said "let's work together" and was opening willing to work with other parties. Th Liberals who insisted on rejecting any coalition or any cooperation with the NDP were destroyed and the obstructionist BQ was annhilated.

The federal NDP just won 30% of the vote in New Brunswick and finished ahead of the Liberals in 7 out of 10 ridings. I think that there is a great opportunity for the provincial party and one part of that process is to try to build up a progressive alternative to the new Tory government. If there are some NB Liberals who recognize that their party is a dead brand and want to get involved in creating a broader leftwing alternative - so much the better - the more the merrier!

Co-operation between parties can only work when the parties co-operating have seats in the legislative bodies. That is not the case of the New Brunswick NDP. Frankly, there is always "co-operation" among areas of "common concern" between parties all the time, so that is not news. Cardy's problem is that the New Brunswick NDP has failed to offer something to voters that the other main parties are not. Piggybacking off the Liberals, considering how they made history by being the first government in the province's history to be booted after one term, will not work. What possible advantage would it be to any Liberal to go to the NDP anyways?

KenS

I dont think you all have the credibility optics right.

The NB Liberals are still a 'real party'. Deserved or not. Wounded or not. And especially: regardless of what Babblers think of them or the mere idea of associating with them.

So the Liberals are a real party. And the NB NDP is a brand that people like.

The leader getting noted as speaking about working with the Liberals is news. Not big news, but a start.

Dominic is deliberately riding right behind in the wake of Jack Layton: "lets work together". Which ultimately leads to much more and much different than the stated objective.

It starts with single steps.

Caissa

The real issue is a debate over what the NB NDP brand will be.  Lines that play well on the national level may not do so well on the provincial level.

KenS

The need for floor level credibility- do people think you can achieve anything at all, however much they like you- is a pretty universal thing across Canada.

You can see where the shift happened for the NS NDP: Alexa McDonough established all the fundamentals and was very highly regarded, but never had it as provincial leader. Ironically, her movement to the national stage as hometown girl, had everything to do with the NS NDP getting over that hump that she couldn't manage. Thats a one-off unique example of turning the corner, but it still illusrates that it has to happen.

Aristotleded24

KenS wrote:
I dont think you all have the credibility optics right.

The NB Liberals are still a 'real party'. Deserved or not. Wounded or not. And especially: regardless of what Babblers think of them or the mere idea of associating with them.

So the Liberals are a real party. And the NB NDP is a brand that people like.

The leader getting noted as speaking about working with the Liberals is news. Not big news, but a start.

Dominic is deliberately riding right behind in the wake of Jack Layton: "lets work together". Which ultimately leads to much more and much different than the stated objective.

It starts with single steps.

Ken, there is nothing to work with. The NDP has no seats in the New Brusnwick legislature, and neither the Liberals nor the PCs will want to help a party without seats get in. The NDP will have to win this fight on its own.

KenS

If it was all so static as you say, then the NS NDP would never have got off the ground.

And it certainly does not require the approval or cooperation of the other parties. What is happening first and foremost is a dialogue with the public. And if the public is taking note, other parties cannot afford to be dismissive.

1springgarden

Well, let's say the NB NDP needs badly to win a seat in the next NB election.  It would seem the leader would be the person you would be looking to see elected first and foremost.  I mean, it's less than optimal to have the leader of a viable political party observing from the visitors gallery (as Alexa McDonough did in Nova Scotia in 1981 before winning her Halifax seat in the 1981 provincial election).

The problem for Dominic Cardy, in not having contested for the NB NDP leadership, is that he lacks an in-built base of support, a demonstrated constituency, a network of supporters who have proven they can contest and win something.  Those are the electoral troops, the machine, that you need to have a hope to contest and win the leader's riding in the next provincial election.  Without such a demonstrated base of support for the leader, Cardy's hopes for winning his seat are questionable.

If Cardy knows he doesn't have the on the ground support to win his riding in four years, then he may be looking to cut a Dion-May style non-compete agreement with the NB Liberals so that the leader can be elected to the legislature, in exchange for the NDP not competing in some ridings where the Liberals are hampered by vote splits.

To me this is a completely unacceptable way to advance the NDP in New Brunswick.  It's a clever deal instead of getting out there, connecting with a constituency and fighting for New Brunswickers.  Cardy should spend the next four years door knocking in his riding, rather than try and make clever deals with the NDP Liberals.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

If I were a rank-and-file NDP member in NB, I'd be looking at starting a "dump-Cardy" movement right about now.  It's hard to believe that this guy has his party's best interests at heart in this proposal.

I'm guessing he'll be seeking a Liberal nomination by the next provincial election.

aka Mycroft

About a decade ago, Dominic was one of the few open Third Wayers in the NDP and it seems not much has changed.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

1springgarden wrote:

Well, let's say the NB NDP needs badly to win a seat in the next NB election.  It would seem the leader would be the person you would be looking to see elected first and foremost.  I mean, it's less than optimal to have the leader of a viable political party observing from the visitors gallery (as Alexa McDonough did in Nova Scotia in 1981 before winning her Halifax seat in the 1981 provincial election).

The problem for Dominic Cardy, in not having contested for the NB NDP leadership, is that he lacks an in-built base of support, a demonstrated constituency, a network of supporters who have proven they can contest and win something.  Those are the electoral troops, the machine, that you need to have a hope to contest and win the leader's riding in the next provincial election.  Without such a demonstrated base of support for the leader, Cardy's hopes for winning his seat are questionable.

If Cardy knows he doesn't have the on the ground support to win his riding in four years, then he may be looking to cut a Dion-May style non-compete agreement with the NB Liberals so that the leader can be elected to the legislature, in exchange for the NDP not competing in some ridings where the Liberals are hampered by vote splits.

To me this is a completely unacceptable way to advance the NDP in New Brunswick.  It's a clever deal instead of getting out there, connecting with a constituency and fighting for New Brunswickers.  Cardy should spend the next four years door knocking in his riding, rather than try and make clever deals with the NDP Liberals.

Interesting if depressing analysis.

If he sees things that way then why isn't he using the next four years to BUILD that ground strength?  Four years isn't enough time to do that in ONE provincial riding?  If that's how he sees things, why the hell did he seek the leadership of a provincial political party at all?

And, if he had no support network, how did he get acclaimed as party leader?

Who was it in the NB NDP ranks who thought this guy should BE leader and no one else should even be considered?  Shouldn't you want a leader who actually thinks it's possible for the party she or he seeks to lead to gain ground?

I'd think at least one of the federal NDP candidates who made an unexpectedly strong showing on May 2nd should be considered immediately as a replacement for Cardy.

Stockholm

Virtually all of those federal candidates are close allies of Cardy's. His deputy leader ran against Dominic Leblanc and did well and the interim leader who ran well in Fredericton is also an ally of his. In fact almost everyone (apart from a few eccentric malcontents) in the NB NDP is a close ally of his because so much of the current membership are people he brought in. He did contest the leadership and he was set to win it by an overhelming margin - but then his only opponent got disqualified for reasons best left unsaid. That's the way the ball bounces - if you are te only candidate, you win by acclamation.

I think it makes sense to look at what has worked so well for the federal NDP under Layton and for the NS NDP under Dexter and try to replicate it in New Brunswick.

As recently as a year and a half ago, the NB NDP literally had a couple of hundred members in the whole province - there was NOTHING. I think that anyone who is willing to make the effort to build something out of nothing and do it for no salary deserves gratitude more than anything else.

KenS

1springgarden wrote:

The problem for Dominic Cardy, in not having contested for the NB NDP leadership, is that he lacks an in-built base of support....

If Cardy knows he doesn't have the on the ground support to win his riding in four years, then he may be looking to cut a Dion-May style non-compete agreement with the NB Liberals so that the leader can be elected to the legislature, in exchange for the NDP not competing in some ridings where the Liberals are hampered by vote splits.

Interesting?

I suppose so, if you like your speculations warm. Speculations that are literally baseless in principle, and simply incorrect to boot.

Speculation # 1: Cardy has no base of support in the NB NDP, Stockholm touched on that a bit. Cardy isnt liked by NB Babblers who are also Dippers- which tells us how much about his support in the NB NDP?

Speculation # 2: therefore Cardy knows he cannot win a seat, and is looking for a deal with the Liberals that includes a non-compete agreement. Ridiculous. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth about Cardy. I guarantee you, Dominic Cardy assumes he will win a seat for himselef- and if that's all, he'll consider it a major dissapointment. [He is not looking at repeating the Elizabeth Weir experience.]

1springgarden wrote:
 

To me this is a completely unacceptable way to advance the NDP in New Brunswick.  It's a clever deal instead of getting out there, connecting with a constituency and fighting for New Brunswickers.  Cardy should spend the next four years door knocking in his riding, rather than try and make clever deals with the NDP Liberals.

Then you are in agreement- Cardy would also agree this ridiculous approach would be unacceptable.

And I have pointed out multiple times now that this gesture towards the Liberals is all about getting his and the NDP's name out there.

The 'clever deal' is a figment of people who go beyond jumping to conclusions.

1springgarden

I admit I am engaging in speculation about what Cardy means by "New Brunswick's Liberals and New Democrats should consider greater co-operation between the parties to push forward policies of common interest" and "What I'd like to see is a discussion that could lead to something in the form of a larger meeting ... among progressive voters in New Brunswick in the next year or so." 

Overt talk of cosying up to the Liberals just one month after taking the leadership helm of the NB NDP, is basically touching the third rail of NDP politics for many party members.  Along with the the acclamation-by-engineering-the-rules leadership selection puts Cardy in a position of having something to prove to NDP members regardless of how many he signed up on the road to acclamation. 

Ken, you yourself said Cardy should explain these comments and I agree.  Otherwise you are speculating by suggesting that Cardy is somehow triangulating and looking for something "much more and much different than the stated objective".

Otherwise it looks like its "all about me", something that was said repeatedly about Elizabeth May on her road to a federal seat for the Greens.

Cardy needs to address to provincial party members the perceived democratic deficit in the NB NDP (admit the restrictive leadership rules were counter productive) and then show how he is building a NB NDP that can do battle in more than just his riding next election.  Engineering, triangulating and deals with the Liberals just leads to speculation about where the NB NDP is headed and that it is "all about me".

That's the taste in my mouth but I'll grant that Cardy is just getting started in his job and I will be happy to be proven wrong.

 

KenS

I'm not engaging in any speculation at all about what Dominic Cardy has done, or what he has in mind with the gestures towards the Liberals that people here find alarming and upsetting.

That said...

1springgarden wrote:

Overt talk of cosying up to the Liberals just one month after taking the leadership helm of the NB NDP, is basically touching the third rail of NDP politics for many party members.  Along with the the acclamation-by-engineering-the-rules leadership selection puts Cardy in a position of having something to prove to NDP members regardless of how many he signed up on the road to acclamation.

With the important caveat of pointing out that you and others presume it to be cosying up to the Liberals, I agree that he has at least gone close tp a third rail that should be paid attention to.

And I know that Dominic Cardy can be cavalier about that sort of thing. Add to that, the bubble thinking characteistic of a small party. So the fact that Cardy has a lot of support, does not mean that he should not pay close attention. That is part of what leadership is about.

I dont think the rules were gamed to give Cardy an acclamation. To be blunt: Dominic would have known he could beat anyone no matter what the rules, and having at least some kind of race is always better.

I think what happened is probably a case in point of how cavalier Dominic can be. IE, the minimum thresholds of fundraising to qualify as a candidate were a good thing, and "anyone worth it can do this." And with organizational experience so thin in the NB NDP, virtually no one would have equivalent experience in the amount of work and capability required.

1springgarden wrote:

Otherwise it looks like its "all about me", something that was said repeatedly about Elizabeth May on her road to a federal seat for the Greens.

Cardy needs to address to provincial party members the perceived democratic deficit in the NB NDP (admit the restrictive leadership rules were counter productive) and then show how he is building a NB NDP that can do battle in more than just his riding next election.  Engineering, triangulating and deals with the Liberals just leads to speculation about where the NB NDP is headed and that it is "all about me".

That's the taste in my mouth from one province over but I'll grant that Cardy is just getting started in his job and I will be happy to be proven wrong.

We're back again to mostly baseless speculation.

Especially the 'its all about me'.

And while the perceived democratic deficit does need to be addressed; conversely, it is presumptuous to say that Cardy has to admit that the leadership rules were counter-productive. What he has to do is listen, give an account, and be open to admitting.

And again, its only speculation this is about 'triangulating' and making deals. I can understand some of the things that get people to jump to such conclusions, but that does not conferr on them any validity.

Caissa

I think its fair to say Cardy would have beaten Cyr for the leadership. I was supporting Cyr. We'll never know how close the race might have been. The next leadership review might provide some indications in that direction.

KenS

Leadership reviews are not all they are cracked up to be. But in this case, it will presumably give you a good measure of how much discontent there is over the process.

When is Convention? And do only delegates vote in the review?

Caissa

I can't find that information on the NB NDP website but it may be there and I just don't know where to look.

Wikipaedia has an interesting history of the party.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswick_New_Democratic_Party

Stockholm

I'm pretty sure that when the NB NDP has a convention, any card carrying member who shows up can vote. Remember that in the "good old days" before Cardy started organizing the party there were only a couple of hundred members in the whole province - it would be absurd to have 200 members choose 150 people or so people to be delegates! Since that time I'm told that membership went way up during the election campaign and during the campaign for the leadership when each candidate had to sign up "x" number of new members who were also making monthly donations. On top of that, there was another bunch of new blood injected to the party during the recent federal election campaign when the NDP won almost 30% of the vote across NB - and let's face it, young newly engaged people who decided to join the NDP because they were attracted to Layton's federal campaign - are probably going to give the benefit of the doubt to the current provincial leadership.

I understand that some people don't like the idea of the NDP trying to project a more mainstream, professional image and also object to the idea of talking about working with other parties. Are any of the people who take that position planning on going to the federal NDP convention in Vancouver next month to actively campaign against Jack Layton when he faces a leadership review with the idea of deposing him for doing all of the above?? Let's face it, if you object to Cardy as NB NDP leader for the reasons given above - then you should also be horrified by the direction jack layton has taken the federal NDP in and you should be organizing to have him deposed.

My advice to the NB NDP dissidents is to take things one step at a time. First try to majority of federal NDP delegates to vote to get rid of Layton next month, then if you succeed at that task, the next step would eb to organize to get party members in NB to reject cardy's leadership in the Fall. Maybe if you succeed in those two tasks the next sgtep would be to try to get the Nova Scotia NDP to vote to fire Darrell Dexter as its leader as well!

Aristotleded24

Stockholm wrote:
I understand that some people don't like the idea of the NDP trying to project a more mainstream, professional image and also object to the idea of talking about working with other parties. Are any of the people who take that position planning on going to the federal NDP convention in Vancouver next month to actively campaign against Jack Layton when he faces a leadership review with the idea of deposing him for doing all of the above?? Let's face it, if you object to Cardy as NB NDP leader for the reasons given above - then you should also be horrified by the direction jack layton has taken the federal NDP in and you should be organizing to have him deposed.

Layton and his team of MPs have already been elected, and are trying to co-operate with other MPs on areas of common interest. Neither Cardy nor anyone else from his party has been elected, and no elected MLA in New Brunswick has any interest whatsoever in helping out Cardy.

If Cardy wants to work with the Liberals so much, why doesn't he just join them?

KenS

Sophistry.

Caissa

Your advice Stockholm carries just a whiff of disingenuousness to me.

Caissa

New Brunswick's NDP has caught the Liberals for second place in popular support among voters, according to the latest Corporate Research Associates poll.

The Liberals and the NDP are tied at 20 per cent among decided and leaning voters. But both parties are trailing David Alward's Progressive Conservatives, which was picked by 56 per cent as their preferred party.

The Corporate Research Associates quarterly political poll found the number of undecided respondents was 37 per cent.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2011/06/07/nb-cra-poll...

Stockholm

...and 14% say Cardy would make the best Premier which is the best showing for an NDP leader in about the last ten years and not bad for someone who has only had the job for a couple of months and is not that well-known yet.

Its all good.

I'm not sure why this is in the thread about suggesting cooperating with the Liberals. Its more of a general NB politics story.

Caissa

14 + 15=29

Stockholm

so? 14+39 = 54? 2+2=4 except when it equals 5.

The NB Liberals will pick a new leader at some point and they won't disappear without a fight. One thing for sure, though - this wave of popularity for the NB NDP and for cardy will be like a knife in the gut to the three or four people who keep bad mouthing him...maybe they'll have to go back to plan B and stage a hostile takeover of the Green party.

Caissa

I'll count you amongst the charter members of the Dominic Cardy fan club, Stockholm.

You under estimate the opposition to Cardy's leadership amongst the membership.

Stockholm

The proof will be in the pudding when the party has a convention in the fall. I suspect that beyond three or four malcontents - everyone else will be delighted to have a leader who's taken the party to levels of popularity not seen in many, many years. Back when the party was totally moribund "the membership" was about 12 people and it was easy to get a clique together and try to control it. Now as a result of the leadership contest and the federal election, membership is vastly larger. Three or four malcontents have gone from being 30% of 12 people to being less than 1% of over a thousand people.

That's what happens when a party grows. Little cliques of ideologues who liked being a big fish in a small pond get diluted and rendered powerless.

Anonymouse

Roger Duguay took the NDP to 22% in the polls, but as Stockholm notes, never had 14% support as leader. Looks like Cardy is currently doing as well as Duguay ever did.

Caissa

Are you predicting Stockholm that Cardy will get 99% approval at the Convention? If you are would you care to back up this assertion with your pocketbook? I'm always happy to make some easy money.

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