NS Politics Potpourri

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KenS

NDP Government Gives Fracking Waste Handler Free Ride: Colchester County Left Holding Bag

If you click on the author's name you get a list of my previous 4 articles on the issue. Though all of them may be hotlinked as references in the text of the story.

 

KenS

Here's where the NDP government fits in, and what it has done around the issue.

There is a Timeline at the bottom of the article above. Most of the timespan has been on the NDP's watch. But fracking was off the radar completely until early 2011. With the public attention, the light switches go on in the government and the civil service that has ostensibly been regulating. Instructions from the top: give the impression you are doing something.

As the heat builds up to Spring 2012, an election that will already be a challenge for the NDP is only a year off... and this will be at no-win boil by then. So lets say we are having a Review, which completes after the election. And because the shale gas bubble has burst, and we are out here in the boonies, no one wants to frack in Nova Scotia now anyway. So lets call it a 2 year moratorium, with a Review.

There was clearly a need for a Review on Fracking. And there were two basic ways the government could have approached the issue, and particularly of examining the regulatory history so far.

1.] A frank assesment of the regulatory process to date.

2.] A message control approach avoiding talk, and covering up when discussion cannot be avoided, about how embarassingly bad the regulatory experience is, and continues to unfold years after the fracking.

You could say this is just another case of governments doing as little as they can and ducking an issue. And the government has been ducking this issue- including when necessary, adroit manouvering.

But if it was all about political calculations and avoiding a tough issue, the answer would be simple: ban fracking. Period.

The government can at best avoid losing votes as fracking remains a controversial issue, let alone if the issue rises in visibility [which we have started working at more deliberately]. There are no votes to be won on giving even a very qualified green light to fracking. The constituency of people who are actually proponents is too tiny to be measured [and they dont vote NDP anyway].

But they do have money. And the influence they have bought over the years is well distributed and well placed.

 

The Dexter government could easily, and pretty honestly, have laid all the blame on the previous government they inherited this mess from, "and we will do better."

But that isnt the message control route. Dexter Crew obviously want the option to say yes to fracking [after the election]. Information that casts doubt on whether your regulatory agencies can ever have the requisite capabilities is inconvenient. So: deflect and decapitate. 

Slumberjack

Everything is on hold until after the election, after which, let there be no doubt that the full monstrosity of this government's slate of priorities will be revealed to all.

KenS

Recent NS Poll on Fracking

Quote:

Nova Scotia residents are moderately opposed to hydrofracking in the province even if regulations are in place to protect the environment, according to the most recent survey conducted by CRA. 

For purposes of predicting how public opinion will fare in the actual likely situation [not an abstract question asked of people at this moment]... it is good they put into the survey questions the assumption that what are viewed / promoted as "strong regulations" are in place.

What the results say is that even after a Fracking Review is tabled, and if the government were to copy the New Bruswick government, as they have given indications they are inclined, with supposedly "the strongest regualtions on the continent", opposition to fracking will still be strong.

The reference to "moderately opposed" is to the numbers- a slight majority were opposed. [More like, still opposed, even with the sugar coating of the question.] You know that opposed group includes a very large block for whom this is a decisively important issue. With the numbers decisively favouring fracking, being minute, and unlikely to vote NDP anyway.

So this is an issue on which the best political outcomes that can be hoped for if the government wants to keep open the possibility of fracking, is that the opposition will eventually diminish to the point of 'tolerable political cost'. I think I'm in a position to say that is highly unlikely. But from the view inside the Dexter government, it could rationally be seen as plausible. Still, at that, no walk in the park.

So, the realpolitik for the Dexter government, is that continuing to work for the option of open door on fracking [with The Best Regulations of course] may at best eventually work out.

And against that possibility is the near term risk: punting off the issue until after the election with a Review has not worked. It refuses to go to bed. In fact, it gradually picks up momentum. And because the government paid so little attention, the mess left from fracking in 2008 is still with us... now under public glare, and with the various controversial processes that flare up periodically, guaranteed to run for at the very least many months more.

Tick, tick, tick.

And the Dexter government leaves itself open to being seriously bit in the ass, for what reason now?

KenS

I did not notice this editorial last week about that poll.

Emotional rationalization

 

Quote:

This is how CRA chief executive officer Don Mills summed up the results for the Chronicle Herald: “This has become an emotional issue, rather than a rational discussion. At some point, we have to get back to a rational discussion.”

Why would a truly rational being — a Vulcan from “Star Trek” perhaps — object to a royalty-generating practice if the government could guarantee that it wouldn’t harm the environment? The word “guarantee” isn’t in the question, but “government regulations ... stringent enough to protect the environment” implies a guarantee.

The trouble with the question is that those who were asked it were apparently supposed to suspend belief and imagine that the government could guarantee something that it can’t guarantee. Anyone who said “oppose” appears non-rational.

A better question? How about this: “Do you think the government has the ability to enact environmental protection regulations stringent enough that you would support the practice of hydrofracking?”

Mills said the “slight majority” of opponents to fracking in Nova Scotia “is a challenge to both the industry and government in terms of developing the economic opportunity associated with shale gas in the province.”

KenS

NOFRAC releases

OUT OF CONTROL: Nova Scotia's Experience with Fracking for Shale Gas

Monday 22 April 7:00 Kennetcook Fire Hall [behind Home Hardware]

 

 

The report comes from chewing through thousands of pages of Freedom of Information documents.

KenS
KenS

So we had over 100 people at our community meeting releasing the report.

NOFRAC reports on the Kennetcook launch meeting.

MSM: Information on fracking lacking, report says

You can choose from the full report, executive summary, and supporting documents here.

1springgarden

KenS wrote:

So we had over 100 people at our community meeting releasing the report.

NOFRAC reports on the Kennetcook launch meeting.

MSM: Information on fracking lacking, report says

You can choose from the full report, executive summary, and supporting documents here.

Great job!  I read the report in the Chronicle-Herald yesterday.  I'll read the full report today.

KenS

Importing my comment from the 'Tom Mulcair' thread discussion baout the constraints of social democratic parties and governments opperating in the political and fiscal environment of the deliberate neo-con destruction of government fiscal capabilities.

 

Rule # 1: at least do not shoot self in foot.

 

Hunky_Monkey wrote:

I haven't been in agreement with all of the Dexter government's decisions.  But take a minute to consider the financial hole he inherited.  

One example makes this crystal clear... last year the Conservatives were in office, they received over $450 million in offshore revenue and budgeted that for program spending... health and education spending.  

What did the Dexter NDP government receive this year?  $25 million.  The government had to backfill almost a half billion is spending thanks to the economic genius of the former government.

We're seeing some of the fruits of some tough choices including restoring dental coverage to children that the Tories and Liberals cut when in office and covering insulin pumps for those under 19. 

So what does the Dexter Crew do?

When they come in, despite contrary promises, they raise the HST 2%. They manage that well politically. That puts back in over $300 million annually in that big revenue hole. And since that revenue trend didnt go from $450 to $25 million in one year, that is manageable. With the deficit being wrestled down, pundits and public alike accept the HST hike.

And what does Dexter Crew do? They decide reversing the HST hike is a political necessity. So lets go and create a new over $300 million revenue hole.

Brilliant.

And so much for the argument that its all driven by 'having no real choice'.

Hunky_Monkey

Wasn't the promise that a one percent cut would only happen when the surplus matched the 1% cut? Not that I'm supportive of the reduction but I think it should be described accurately.

KenS

The schedule given a year ago said 1% HST cut in April 2014, in the budget legislation. And the estimate of it costing $190million in revenue.

I certainly don't remember anything about tying it to there being a surplus of that much- which by the way would effectively render the promise meaningless.

So until someone gets some documentation, I think we'll have to call your vague recollection a transformation of wishes into perceived reality.

Slumberjack

It's a bit of a mug's game to try and guess when the election will be called.  If it doesn't occur in May, people might react against being tormented by politics into June and the summer months, in addition to whatever reaction they may already be stockpiling for the occasion.  As with favourable astrology readings though, The NSNDP are practiced in it enough to know that certain stars in particular should be in alignment for an election call.  Unfortunately, the alignment we're most able to observe at present consists of popular grief across the many sectors and demographics orbiting Dexter's world.  He may very well be counting on the coming position of Earth and Sun to fry everyone's memory.

Hunky_Monkey

Dexter said he made the announcement on the eve of Finance Minister Graham Steele tabling the provincial budget because the document shows the surpluses forecast in a couple of years.

Steele has said the province can’t reduce the tax until the surplus is at least as much as the extra sales tax brings in. He has said one percentage point generates about $180 million, so the Dexter government would expect a surplus of at least $360 million in 2015-16 (with the tax at 15 per cent).

 

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/80388-nova-scotia-cut-hst-13-cent-2015

KenS

Notice how the article says they are able to promise those tax cuts because of the rosy FORECASTS of substantial surpluses in the two fiscal years 2014 to 2016. We know what happened to those forecasts, for 2012 and 2013, let alone the years after.

And I agree with you that it sounds in the article like those tax cut promises are contingent on the actual surpluses being there.

BUT, the article also says:

Quote:
Dexter said the future reductions will be included in legislation this spring.

And I remember them being written into the budget bill last year as 1% April 2014, a further 1% April 2015.

Had they been as contingent as suggested, everybody, not just the Libs and PCs, would have been in laughing fits.

KenS

A couple weeks ago in this thread I questioned why the Dexter government left itself exposed to political losses over fracking, when at least over the short and medium term controversy over fracking can only lose the government support and votes.

If it was all about maximizing votes in the next election the Dexter government would announce either an ouright longer term moratrium on fracking, or announce a robust and comprehensive review of hydraulic fracturing sufficient to assure critics that there is substance behind the promises that the review will look at whether there should be fracking at all. The governments of New York and Quebec got pushed backwards into setting up REAL reviews of fracking.

It isnt about maximizing votes in the next election, the Dexter government is pursuing a vote maximising strategy of both having cake and eating it too.

HAVE CAKE: make sure you dont lose votes over fracking in the coming election by having a token review of fracking that just happens to complete after the election. Among other things that provides your answer to the critics: "We hear you. The Review is studying whether fracking can be safe for Nova Scotia." No matter that the civil servants tasked with the work are only looking at "best regulations".

EAT CAKE: if you can keep the possibility of fracking open- which is what the Review is for- it's another Economic Development strategy. Jobs Start Here. Etc.

Shale gas fracking proponents also talk up the supposed royalties for governments starved for cash. But one of the dirty not-so-secrets of shale gas is that there arent any royalties, and still will not be when and if gas prices increase and there are finally profits in shale gas. I suspect the Dexter government knows that.

But the only thing this government really runs on is 'fiscal competence' and "bringing home the jobs"

On those promises of jobs:

Exposing the Oil and Gas Industry’s False Jobs Promise for Shale Gas Development: How Methodological Flaws Grossly Exaggerate Jobs Projections

Fracking Nonsense: The Job Myth of Gas Drilling

Ohio fracking boom has not brought jobs

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Building Strategically:
An Introduction to Solidarity Halifax

How can the left fight back in the age of austerity? This is a clear and constant question being posed by and to people on the left. When the worldwide economic crisis hit in 2008, it was clear there would not be an immediate shift toward radical alternatives to capitalism. Still, five years into the crisis there has been little growth or development in the position of the anti-capitalist left.

This is not to say there hasn't been plenty of struggle or resistance; the Occupy movement and Idle No More are proof of that. The crisis on the left is not one of struggle or resistance; it is a crisis of organization and strategy. The question is: how can we collectively move beyond defensive struggles to offensive strategies that are capable of turning short-term resistance into a long-term organizing strategy? What the left has largely been lacking are organizations that can effectively develop and fight for alternatives to capitalism.

The economic crisis exposed a material crisis of ideas, organization, and leadership on the left. In the face of this crisis, we want to point out Solidarity Halifax, a project that we were at various times involved in that is taking this crisis seriously by attempting to strengthen the collective power of the anti-capitalist left in Halifax, specifically.....

http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/814.php

KenS
Unionist

What the hell is going on in Nova Scotia??

[url=http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1128701-earle-leaves-ndp-over-ha... leaves NDP over handling of Home case[/url]

Quote:

A well-known New Democrat has left the party over the province’s handling of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children case.

Gordon Earle, the former MP for Halifax West, confirmed Thursday that he notified the party and Premier Darrell Dexter last weekend that he was turning in his NDP membership card.

“Basically, it’s been a very troubling decision to come to, and it’s not one I arrived at lightly,” Earle said in an interview from Manitoba, where he’s visiting family.

“I am very, very disappointed with the approach that the NDP is taking.”

Earle has been a member of the party for more than a decade and won the Halifax West seat in 1997. He was the first black MP ever elected in Nova Scotia.

“Rather than trying to facilitate an agreement (with former residents of the Home for Colored Children), the province has taken every (opportunity) to cover up the issue and not allow the light of day to shine on what took place,” he said.

Earle is married to Jane Earle, a former executive director at the home. She has publicly voiced her concerns about the level of child abuse that allegedly took place at the home over decades.

And:

[url=http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1128641-steele-returns-to-ns-cab... returns to N.S. cabinet after Paris resignation[/url]

Quote:
[Minister for economic and rural development and tourism Percy] Paris resigned late Thursday night from his post, after being charged with assault and uttering threats in an alleged altercation earlier Thursday with Liberal MLA Keith Colwell at Province House. [...]

The confrontation allegedly took place just after question period, near the men’s room outside the legislative chamber. Both men are 65. [...]

Paris, who is also the African Nova Scotia affairs minister and the only MLA of African descent, wouldn’t say exactly what provoked him.

But he said there has been an “accumulation of things” said that don’t sit well with him.

“I’m hearing some things being said directly about the African-Nova Scotian community which I don’t agree with that strike a very sensitive chord within me, and that cord has been getting tighter and tighter,” he said.

 

Slumberjack

What's going on?  We have a shit show for a government thats what.  The popular sentiment suggests that the back end of this party as its driven from power can't come soon enough.

Charles

To be replaced with what, pray tell? 

Slumberjack

There's a real problem when it no longer matters to people what may come to pass, so long as the ones being replaced are finally gone.  Animosity can only be built up for so long before people start looking forward to biting off their own nose to spite their face.

Unionist

Actually, I was wondering (if anyone knows and cares to comment) what's happening in the relationship between the government and the African Nova Scotian community. Should I move this to the anti-racism forum?

 

Slumberjack

Post 31 in this thread can't auger very well in terms of the relationship.

KenS

Unionist wrote:

Actually, I was wondering (if anyone knows and cares to comment) what's happening in the relationship between the government and the African Nova Scotian community. Should I move this to the anti-racism forum?

I'm not going to directly address that larger question. But the question seems to understandably follow from 

Quote:

Paris, who is also the African Nova Scotia affairs minister and the only MLA of African descent, wouldn’t say exactly what provoked him.

But he said there has been an “accumulation of things” said that don’t sit well with him.

“I’m hearing some things being said directly about the African-Nova Scotian community which I don’t agree with that strike a very sensitive chord within me, and that cord has been getting tighter and tighter,” he said.

and this:

Quote:

A well-known New Democrat has left the party over the province’s handling of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children case.

Gordon Earle, the former MP for Halifax West, confirmed Thursday that he notified the party and Premier Darrell Dexter last weekend that he was turning in his NDP membership card.

“Basically, it’s been a very troubling decision to come to, and it’s not one I arrived at lightly,” Earle said in an interview from Manitoba, where he’s visiting family.

“I am very, very disappointed with the approach that the NDP is taking.”

Earle has been a member of the party for more than a decade and won the Halifax West seat in 1997. He was the first black MP ever elected in Nova Scotia.

“Rather than trying to facilitate an agreement (with former residents of the Home for Colored Children), the province has taken every (opportunity) to cover up the issue and not allow the light of day to shine on what took place,” he said.

Earle is married to Jane Earle, a former executive director at the home. She has publicly voiced her concerns about the level of child abuse that allegedly took place at the home over decades.

I know Percy Paris a bit. And it is safe to say that Percy's reference to "accumulated things" is about the personal wear and tear from expressions of racism in the House- and over a very long period of time, rather than events of the moment. I believe he has publicly said pretty much that same thing, and more than once.

The government's attempt to settle the Colored Children Home case and put it to bed, is not going well as you can see, despite initial universal pleasure at the Premeir personally stepping in. And this was just a short time ago.

I'm sure this has been very uncomfortable for Percy Paris. The other MLA is a white guy and Liberal represesnts the very old African Nova Scotian community of Preston, where the Home was. The constituency also has rapidly growing white suburbs, but Colwell has a base in Preston as well. It doesn't take a speculative mind to figure that it is likely Colwell took a dig at Percy right at where he would know Percy is struggling.

Whether or not that is close to what happened, Percy has made it clear enough that there is a substantial personal component to this. I think if it had been a straight up racist dig taken at him, you would not see Percy resigning for shoving an MLA. Besides, it is not ugly racist remarks in the loo where you see racism displayed at Province House.

The overall relationship of the government with African Nova Scotians, I'm not going to address. Not likely I would anyway, but I do not yet have enough of a read on recent events.

 

 

KenS

Slumberjack wrote:

The popular sentiment suggests that the back end of this party as its driven from power can't come soon enough.

Charles wrote:

To be replaced with what, pray tell?  

Fair point.

But here is another one.

I'm just one of many NDP activists who does not care if they win or lose the coming election.

I regularly sit myself down for the rational conversation, or have it with others who are madder still:

Rationally, I know that the Liberals in power could make things worse. Probabilistically speaking, they are likely to do so even without 'covert intent' or whatever.

But does that make any difference to me?

Not really.

If it were left solely to me, I would pick them over the alternatives for the next round of governing us. But I know that does not motivate me even to want to vote, let alone care, let alone even think of helping [scoff].

I never cared when it looked like the more foolish Tories might replace the Liberals.

Back then I at least had the personal satisfaction of voting for tommorow.

 

1springgarden

Percy Paris made a mistake at a critical time that the opposition Liberals have wisely capitalized on.  As a result, the NDP's message in the final week of the spring legislature sitting has been totally lost. 

The NDP could be in for a real drubbing in the next Nova Scotia election, as many of the new rural seats will be lost in the receding tide of support while in metro-Halifax five NDP MLAs are not re-offering, giving up whatever advantage incumbency provides.  Certainly Percy Paris, through his undisciplined conduct, has somewhat damaged his own chances of re-election in Waverly-Fall River.

For NDP supporters, it may be best to take the opportunity to 'clean house', starting with replacing Darrell Dexter as leader.  Dexter has become  a lightning rod for voter discontent with government -- voters are not happy with the amount of NDP corporate-welfare that has been dispensed as well as the ongoing sleight-of-hand on balancing the budget (the two are connected in voters' minds).  The NDP will do better, post-recession, with a new leader who can promise to balance the budget by stopping Dexter's corporate-welfare gravy train (LOL, but that is the perception -- in any other election it would be a massive NDP opportunity). 

The worst outcome for the NDP come next election will be to retain a minority government with Dexter necessarily as premier.  The Tories and Liberals will bide their time before sticking the knife in at first miscue.  Better to get it over with sooner, clean house, get a new leader and a new approach.  NDP finance ministers Maureen MacDonald and Graham Steele both retain credibility as competent, straight shooters who have had problems with Dexter's corporate-welfare plus tax-cutting policies which does not equal balanced budgets.

To be fair to Premier Dexter, corporate-welfare as industrial strategy may have made sense in the depths of a recession, but it is time for the NS NDP to move on and get a new approach.

Hunky_Monkey

I'm curious which "corporate welfare" deals you oppose and which ones you support?  Or is it a blanket opposition to it?

1springgarden

Hunky, I'm opposed to the overall volume of corporate welfare handouts during the first term of the Dexter government in Nova Scotia, as it is impairing the ability of the province to balance its budget.  The agenda of  

1) excessive corporate welfare

2) tax cutting promises for 2014 & 2015

3) balanced budget

can only be a recipe for coming austerity in a second NDP term.

I would like to see the NDP commit more to a made-in-Nova Scotia business development strategy, with a focus on CED and support for small businesses and rely less on big $ deals with corporate operators who swoop in with a promise to save ailing industries (paper, wind towers) but often disappoint and leave when the money dries up (RIM, IBM?).

FYI, I support the long-term $300 million investment in Irving's Halifax Shipyard as I believe Irving had already demonstrated its commitment to operating ship-related industry there and the promise of the federal government as a main customer is a very good opportunity.

 

My message is, you can't write lots of cheques to corporations, cut the HST and expect to balance the budget, it won't happen.  NDP, get a new plan, a new leader or both.

 

Hunky_Monkey

There is often a careful calculation of money going to a company, like RIM, and the money lost if they closed up shop and left to the local economy and tax revenue.

1springgarden

Hunky_Monkey wrote:

There is often a careful calculation of money going to a company, like RIM, and the money lost if they closed up shop and left to the local economy and tax revenue.

That is good to hear.  If you are saying the money given to help corporations operate industries in Nova Scotia is carefully calculated to be a winning formula, then there goes my argument that excessive corporate welfare is preventing balanced budgets.  You are saying that carefully calculated opportunities to help corporations operate are a net benefit for the economy and tax revenue. 

Unfortunately, many Nova Scotians are not convinced that high-profile handouts have in aggregate been winning investments for the provincial economy and tax revenues.  There is a countervailing sentiment that the Dexter NDP has been too loose with the cheque book, that many of the handouts are losing propositions for the province and that the inability to balance the budget has been partly due to excessive corporate welfare. 

Obviously, the next election will be significantly a judgement of the efficacy of the Dexter NDP's industrial strategy.

KenS

The net benefit [or not] calculation for corporate giveaways is complex, indirect, and covers future years. No one, not even the government, argues that over the term of a budget, or even two budgets, they are anything but a cost. If the "investments" are ever recovered in real government revenue gains, that is not for years.

That slush fund for this election year was in last year's budget. And it was as much as what was carved out of the education budget [that was 3 times more than the bullshit line that it was equal to enrollment declines].

Nearly a year ago my wife lost her job, so that for the next year Darrel Dexter could travel around dropping cash to the Irvings, Cooke Aquaculture, and the rest of the bandits.

The harvest for that "crop" comes some time this year.

David Young

If the provincial polls in Alberta, Quebec, and now British Columbia have shown such great deviations from the actual results, I'm feeling better and better about the chances that the NDP will be re-elected here in Nova Scotia.

 

 

Aristotleded24

David Young wrote:
If the provincial polls in Alberta, Quebec, and now British Columbia have shown such great deviations from the actual results, I'm feeling better and better about the chances that the NDP will be re-elected here in Nova Scotia.

Yikes. Re-electing Dexter will be damaging in the long-term to the NDP brand.

Slumberjack

Fracking Water Banned from Debert Sewers

Quote:
In its decision, the county writes: it is not the role of the Municipality to allow the Bay of Fundy to be a petri dish for fracking wastewater.”  The provincial government gave the plan partial approval, while the company argued the water will meet federal guidelines.  But the committee reviewing the project on behalf of the county said important information was missing, specifically, the chemical composition of the fracking water.  “The river and the Bay of Fundy are too important to permit such discharge on an experimental basis.”  The county said it wanted to hear independent analysis of how other areas dealt with similar situations.  “It is the Municipality’s role to ensure the environment is protected now and in the future,” the decision said. “In that role, it must exercise caution to act only when the information is complete.”

Certainly not.  That's the role of the NSNDP.

KenS
KenS

 

Fracking Waste Disposal: Colchester County Steps Up

Nova Scotia Government Too Busy Making Sure Everything Is Safe for Companies

 

Quote:

In the end the Committee feels it is not the role of the Municipality to allow the Bay of Fundy to be petri dish for fracking wastewater.

Colchester County Sewer Use Decision May 16, 20133

 

In its decision to overturn the approval to allow the discharge of fracking wastes into its sewer system, the Colchester County Committee stressed the importance of citizen participation in arriving at their decision. Four years ago Premier Dexter also spoke to the importance of citizen participation at the swearing in ceremony of the new NDP government of Nova Scotia.

Seems like a long time ago, those four years..  

janfromthebruce

nothing

KenS

If anyone was entertaining hopes that the NDP would after winning the election, just brush aside those promsed HST cuts and the therfore continuing deep spending cuts that will go with them...

Well the pre-campaign ads even feature the promised cuts. 

There may have been others, I tend not to see ads, even big obnoxious ones [that others point out to me]. This was on page D14, Herald May 23. Saw it on the way into the firebox.

Technically, it is an ad for John MacDonell, MLA. And maye seeing John's face is what caught my eye. But these are done by and for the party, with the party's featured messages. [Get the MLAs in there too.]

Quote:

HST CUT:

The province has passed legislation to reduce the HST by one point in 2014 and a second point in 2015.

Slumberjack

Finally, some good news out of Nova Scotia:

Quote:
Halifax’s statue of Edward Cornwallis was spray-painted Wednesday night with comments linked to his controversial past.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

He was the founder of Halifax and he murdered the local Mi'kmaq people for their land and resources.  Just another nasty British asshole whose statute is an insult to the Mi'kmaq people.

KenS
Krago

Here's a map of the Metro Halifax area that shows the results of the 2009 provincial election by polling division overlaid by the new electoral district boundaries.

Hunky_Monkey

The governing NDP may be taking its lumps in the polls, but the party continues to lead the charge when it comes to financial contributions.

Elections Nova Scotia information released this week shows the provincial NDP collected $469,557 in 2012, a slight increase from 2011, when the party pulled in $459,401. In 2010, it raised $411,144.

The party that has seen the biggest bump in the polls during the past year also saw the biggest jump in donations for 2012. The official Opposition Liberals raised $338,703, more than double the $153,778 they collected in 2011 and more than triple the $101,405 total for 2010.

Meanwhile, the Progressive Conservatives are in third place in the polls, but the party is a solid second when it comes to raking in the dough.

The Tories raised $363,533 in 2012. That figure is a rebound of sorts for the party, which saw its 2011 collection total dip to $299,629 after raising $314,660 in 2010.

Provincial regulations place a cap of $5,000 on individual donations to a party. Donations from unions and corporations are not permitted.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1139619-ndp-raises-more-money-than-opponents

Hunky_Monkey

Little update... 

Liberal candidate on "green fracking"... http://nsndp.ca/jobs-and-the-economy/liberals-fracking

 

The NDP seems to have been attracting some strong star candidates.  On Monday, they nominated Steve Estey in Dartmouth North.  Such an impressive candidate... 

http://nsndp.ca/people/steve-estey

http://youtu.be/xuuwbIjZLCM

1springgarden

Estey seems like a good NDP candidate.  It's difficult not to support various NDP candidates and I will likely write a cheque to support a few.

At the same time, my question for whichever candidate knocks on my door is what do you anticipate being cut to pay for the upcoming legislated 2% HST reduction ($390 million)?  It's gonna get austerity-ugly post-election, especially if a minority government.

Aristotleded24

Hunky_Monkey wrote:

Little update... 

Liberal candidate on "green fracking"... http://nsndp.ca/jobs-and-the-economy/liberals-fracking

Translation: we're talking the talk on fracking safety to use as a political wedge and mollify our supporters by conducting a "review" which will give us the space we need to go forward with fracking afer the next election.

Hunky_Monkey

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – Nova Scotia is pleased to release our latest report Working Together For Fairness: An Election Primer.  The report critically analyzes the current government’s record in five policy areas over the past four years and makes recommendations for progressive next steps.

“We reviewed what the government’s has done on health care, jobs and the economy, poverty, occupational health & safety, and Nova Scotia Power,” says Christine Saulnier, an author of the report and Director of CCPA-NS.  “We have found the government has taken a different, and more progressive, approach to these five issues than previous governments.”

The report was funded by the Nova Scotia Federation of Labour based on issues identified by workers and their families as priorities for the next provincial election.

 “When it comes to occupational health and safety, the NDP has been willing to look at the root causes of the problem and has began to increase enforcement of safety rules – a major improvement over previous governments,” says Judy Haiven, an author of the report and Professor in the Sobey’s School of Business at Saint Mary’s University.

“Unemployment remains stubbornly high, but the government’s jobsHere strategy is beginning to bear fruit,” says Kyle Buott, an author of the report and Secretary-Treasurer of the Nova Scotia Federation of Labour. “By taking an interventionist approach to the economy and investing in capital improvements, social enterprises and direct equity stakes, the government has pursued a very different approach to economic development.”

“The CCPA-NS calls on all political parties to review this report and consider its progressive policy options.  We will continue to work to hold all parties accountable to principles of fairness and equity after the coming election,” concludes Saulnier.

 

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/news-releases/working-together-fairness-possible-ccpa-ns-election-primer-shows-way

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

NS Liberals Still Ahead Although Gap Narrows

The provincial Liberals continue to lead in terms of voter support this quarter although the gap has narrowed, according to the most recent survey conducted by Corporate Research Associates Inc.  Three in ten Nova Scotians support the NDP (31%, compared with 26% in May 2013), while support for the Liberal Party rests at 41 percent (compared with 45%). Support among decided voters for the PC Party is stable at 25 percent (compared with 26%),

 

KenS

If you havent heard already, it has been 'known' for some time that the writ drops this weekend. October 8 e-day.

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