NS Politics Potpourri

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Caissa

A Halifax teenager involved in online prostitution says girls move between cities to do their work, and some are lured by the prospect of making tens of thousands of dollars in a month.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/sex-sold-online-by-teens-because-it-s-lucrative-girl-says-1.2497133

Slumberjack

Looks like next year Nova Scotians will have a holiday in February.

Quote:
Nova Scotia’s new February holiday will honour civil rights activist Viola Desmond next year, but it will then honour a different person or event each year, the government announced Monday.

Kelly Regan, minister for labour and advanced education, explained how it will work at Bedford South School. Nova Scotia students will suggest a permanent name for the new holiday and ideas for the next 12 people or events to be honoured.

Aristotleded24

Slumberjack wrote:
Looks like next year Nova Scotians will have a holiday in February.

I remember when the Dexter government flatly refused to bring in a February holiday, and I thought it showed a particular tone-deafness. I couldn't understand why Dexter burned his political capital over a silly little holiday that Premiers like Ralph Klein, Gary Doer, Dalton McGuinty, and anywhere else along the political spectrum brought in.

Slumberjack

I'm sure it won't be too long before the Liberal habit of pleasing no one but themselves will eventually result in the day being set aside to celebrate a figure such as Cornwallis.  As for Dexter, it's likely that he gave way to the concerns of the business community.

Aristotleded24

Slumberjack wrote:
I'm sure it won't be too long before the Liberal habit of pleasing no one but themselves will eventually result in the day being set aside to celebrate a figure such as Cornwallis.

The only thing most people would care about is the fact that it is a holiday.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Striking Home Support Workers surround Province House Essential services legislation curtails workers' bargaining power

Five hundred angry and very vocal Northwood Home Support Workers and sympathizers surrounded the provincial Legislature this morning.

The workers, who went on strike today, were protesting proposed essential services legislation introduced by the Liberal government. The legislation will take away their ability to bargain with their employer without constraints.....

http://halifax.mediacoop.ca/story/striking-home-support-workers-surround...

The 440 striking Northwood workers will be forced back to work early next week. An additional 1200 workers province-wide who would have been in a legal strike position in March are also affected.

Hundreds of striking Home Support Workers surround the Nova Scotia Legislature.  They were there to protest essential services legislation that NSGEU President Joan Jessome calls draconian.   Photo Robert Devet

The 440 striking Northwood workers will be forced back to work early next week. An additional 1200 workers province-wide who would have been in a legal strike position in March are also affected. Photo Robert Devet

Slumberjack

Yes, no one is quite sure at the moment if collective bargaining has been outlawed for all health care workers in the province.  It had to be expected that in the transition from one regime to the next, there would be no respite from attacks on the right to organize.  And it certainly is nothing but an assault on workers rights because broad consultations have already been underway for some time between various organizations and the union to identify where essential services were to remain in place during any labour action.

Slumberjack

Healthcare minister Leo Glavine, semi-cognizant abuser of the system:  Doing his share for healthcare.

Quote:
These people need help to break unhealthy habits, because the consequences of smoking, uncontrolled eating and avoidance of physical activity deplete funds that could otherwise go toward saving lives and finding cures. Then there are people who are cognizant abusers of the system. They accept government assistance, yet still have money to travel.  These people are abusing their neighbours’ hard-earned money. The goal of assistance programs is to help people out of a difficult time, not give people free money.  

Proactive healthcare is the best way to restore long-term wealth to our province.Individual responsibility for basic health is crucial. It is very encouraging to see so many active constituents and local grocers and retailers who are providing for healthy eating choices.

Neoliberal medicine is supposed to taste better when it's being spoon fed by 200K plus/year functionaries who toil away in the Public Health bureaus. Its their job to assist the minister with turning discussions pertaining to the social determinants of health into public policy. Here we see what sort of fruit this level of collaboration produces...between people who can afford to buy the good grub.  But the nearly 300 million dollar forgivable loan to the Irvings for building new warships, which was orchestrated by the previous neo-democratic party, remains in effect and on the public books. We have serial abusers for leadership in these parts, one after another it seems.  And yes, those local grocers and retailers who operate franchises for publicly trades stock market empires. How about a hand for all of their efforts while we're at it.

NorthReport

What's with Liberals and their connection with physical violence? 
Nova Scotia minister takes leave after alleged assault by former Liberal staffer

 

Newfoundlander_...

When will the NDP be having their leadership?

KenS

Still a year away.

inukjuak inukjuak's picture

The campaign for the NS NDP leadership has already started, although the official rules will not be approved for a couple of months and the official start of the campaign is not until June 13. There seem to be three candidates gathering support: MLA Dave Wilson, MLA Lenore Zann, and former MLA Gary Burrill. Groups on behalf of each candidate are starting to line up support, organize meetings, evolve a message.

In general, it seems like Burrill and Zann would appeal to those who want a return to a more social-democratic or socialist NDP, while Wilson may represent more of a continuum with the current, more centrist, leadership of the party.

sherpa-finn

On the "Let's look backwards before we move forwards" theme, - Howard Epstein launched his book this week that will presumably provide a useful counterpoint to the book published last year by Graham Steele on what exactly happened inside the Dexter Gov't., around the cabinet table.

Howard's book is entitled "Rise Again: Nova Scotia's NDP on the Rocks".

David Young

One of the Liberal M.L.A.s elected in the 2013 provincial election has passed away.

Alan Rowe, a former TV broadcaster, was the member for Dartmouth South.

Since 1998, the riding as voted NDP, PC, NDP, NDP, NDP, and then Liberal.

Should there be a by-election before the federal election this fall, it would be an good indicator about how the federal riding of Dartmouth-Cole Harbour might go in the 2015 federal election.

 

Debater

Condolences to Mr. Rowe's wife, Yvonne. (photo at link)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/allan-rowe-dartmouth-south-mla...

As to a by-election, it's hard to know what it would show because the premature death of the member may affect the feelings of voters (as it did in Jim Flaherty's riding last fall) and there are some differences between the provincial & federal scene.

What Nova Scotia does have in common though provincially & federally is that the Liberals are #1 in public support at the moment.

KenS

I also dont think that the by-election results will be much of an indication of anything bigger.

And I would not expect the date to be set until after the federal election anyway. [Unless it were to play into some plan that I cannot grasp of organizationally tuning up for the federal election. Cross party lines- that kind of dead serious approach to electoral games is not a thing here.]

KenS

To put it bluntly- the provincial Liberals would no doubt like to bump off Chisholm. But only a handful would devote much to seriously trying to THAT degree. It would not have any traction within the organization.

Newfoundlander_...

inukjuak wrote:

The campaign for the NS NDP leadership has already started, although the official rules will not be approved for a couple of months and the official start of the campaign is not until June 13. There seem to be three candidates gathering support: MLA Dave Wilson, MLA Lenore Zann, and former MLA Gary Burrill. Groups on behalf of each candidate are starting to line up support, organize meetings, evolve a message.

In general, it seems like Burrill and Zann would appeal to those who want a return to a more social-democratic or socialist NDP, while Wilson may represent more of a continuum with the current, more centrist, leadership of the party.

What direction do you think the party wants to move in? Was Dexter seen as a centrist when he won the leaderhip of the party?

KenS

Who knows?

And right now, active or even non-conatose members of the party is very small.

The much more important and larger group is people like me: first waiting to see whether they will enagage at all.

inukjuak inukjuak's picture

There is a lot of dissatisfaction with the current direction of the party. At times it seems like the leadership has learned nothing from the 2013 electoral loss or even from the frank critiques afterwards. I think if the party tries to hold to the centrist, Dexterist line, it will secure its position as the other opposition party for years to come.

This coming year is going to be very interesting. I don't see any of the three likely candidates being pre-emptively the favourite at this point, and of course there may be additional candidates.

BetterOnTheLeft

Two NDP MLAs stepped down today

Gordie Gosse, MLA Sydney-Whitney Pier has been fighting Cancer since last year and it looks to be taking a hard toll.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/gordie-gosse-cape-breton-mla-to-resign-1.3018938

Frank Corbett, MLA Cape Breton Centre, stepping down for family, personal reasons
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/frank-corbett-cape-breton-centre-mla-to-resign-1.3018977

Both seats became competitive for the Liberals in 2013, the NDP winning Sydney-Whitney Pier 49-43 and Cape Breton Centre 45-43. but compare that to 2009 where they NDP won with 71%(Gosse) and 78%(Corbett) big personal vote here from what I can see. 
Three upcoming by-elections in NS, the NDPs best to just focus on these two instead of Dartmouth (unless the party has a star in the wings somewhere that can use their personal appeal to help). Liberals seem to be still in a mild-honeymoon stage based on the last poll so the NDP might be at risk if the Liberals run high with strong candidates. 

Hunky_Monkey

inukjuak wrote:

There is a lot of dissatisfaction with the current direction of the party. At times it seems like the leadership has learned nothing from the 2013 electoral loss or even from the frank critiques afterwards. I think if the party tries to hold to the centrist, Dexterist line, it will secure its position as the other opposition party for years to come.

This coming year is going to be very interesting. I don't see any of the three likely candidates being pre-emptively the favourite at this point, and of course there may be additional candidates.

 

Current direction?  We're in limbo at the moment until a leadership convention which should have happened before now.  Now we face three by-elections with an interim leader.  And while Maureen is doing a fantastic job, an interim leader has little impact on a by-election.

This whole centrist vs left thing is funny.  How did Dexter get elected in the first place?  By running as a socialist?  No, he ran on a very limited platform and as a "conservative progressive".  But somehow, the voters in NS shifted far to the left in 2013 and elected the Liberals?  I think those on the left of the party are grasping at straws on this one.  

Was there an element of disappointment on some issues?  Sure.  But that was one of many factors that led to the Dexter government's loss.

Hunky_Monkey

BetterOnTheLeft wrote:

Three upcoming by-elections in NS, the NDPs best to just focus on these two instead of Dartmouth (unless the party has a star in the wings somewhere that can use their personal appeal to help). Liberals seem to be still in a mild-honeymoon stage based on the last poll so the NDP might be at risk if the Liberals run high with strong candidates. 

I would suspect the party, while leaderless, probably polls better in HRM than it would in CB.  In a way though, having two adjoining ridings in CB and one in HRM means the party can allocate resources a little easier.

Dartmouth South isn't a write off.  We didn't have the incumbent running there in 2013 and our candidate faced a star Liberal candidate.  We still pulled in almost 3000 votes.  The other factor could be a large number of Liberal voters who left us in 2013 may be turned off by the upcoming Liberal budget which is expected to be brutal.  We could be the beneficiaries of a strong protest vote if we do our jobs right.

All ridings would need a star candidate to hold or win.  I'm not familiar with Cape Breton.  In Dartmouth, I noticed a "Draft Bill Zebedee" page on Facebook probably set up by Zebedee himself.  Zebedee wanted to run last time but seemed the members wanted someone else.  He lists his experince as a municipal candidate knocking on 9000 doors but forgets to mention he placed 5th with only 460 votes to the winner's 4,760 votes.  I would suspect we'd need someone far stronger to make a comeback in Dartmouth South.

Debater

Nova News version of the story:

--

Two of Nova Scotia's NDP MLAs resign

April 02, 2015

NDP leader Maureen MacDonald announced April 2 that two of her seven-member caucus are stepping down from their MLA positions. 

Gordie Gosse, Sydney-Whitney Pier, and Frank Corbett, Cape Breton Centre, are resigning.

http://www.novanewsnow.com/News/Regional/2015-04-02/article-4098734/Two-...

1springgarden

Re: NS Liberal budget cuts Film Tax Credit, removes cap on tuition

Best tweet on my Twitter:

Quote:
We in @NSNDP warned the young, the creative sector, the FUSION folks. Now the knives are in your backs. I take no pleasure in being right.

It's true that young people, creatives and young-urban-professionals of Halifax abandoned the NS NDP for the Liberals in the last provincial election.  So I was surprised the Liberal budget put the knife to the NS Film Tax Credit which was popular with these people.  At an Easter brunch I spoke with a couple of urbane film biz owners who promised to move out of NS if the Film Tax Credit was cut, not sure if they're packing but they looked genuinely alarmed.

While this $97-million-deficit Liberal budget is semi-tough on a number of interests, there are no tax cuts (some increases even), it maintains core services and it moves NS finances toward the Dexter NDP goal of "Back to Balance".  So it's hard to see what NDP partisans can quibble with except the details? 

Ehh, it seems former NS NDP Finance Minister Graham Steele agrees that the Liberal budget is credible:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/graham-steele-budget-is-credit...

NS NDPers chime in with your assessment.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

The Nova Scotia film and tv industry is done.

The way the film and tv financing is done in Europe and North America and Australia - and increasingly in other places, like parts of Asia and South America - is that regions put in some sort of incentive, usually a tax credit.  There's an expectation that a producer will leverage that regional funding in addition to national and other investment.  Even domestically, Canadian broadcasters expect that the producers will supplement the budget by leveraging provincial and federal tax credits (or, in the case of Alberta, a grant that acts like a tax credit).  Without the provincial funding, you generally have about a 20-25% hole in your proposed budget.

Nova Scotia had 50% of labour as a refundable credit.  They've now made the credit only 25% refundable.  The rest is non-refundable - ie: if you owe that much in taxes afterward, you don't have to pay it. 

Except that all production is run through single purpose companies.  Because there are so many partners and safeguards on funding going strictly to the production, commissioners, funding agencies and financial institutions insist on it.  The parent company pays taxes on whatever profit is made - but wouldn't be eligible to claim the non-refundable tax credit.  So it is essentially gone.

It will become impossible to take a project into production. 

"Urbane" or not, these filmmakers aren't "promising" to move - if they want to stay in business, they will have no choice.  Case in point:  Me.  I've been making tv documentaries for more than a decade and a half.  I lived in Saskatchewan.  They cancelled the tax credit there in 2012.  Within a year, our industry association went from 600 members to 60.  We spent a year trying to figure out how to make it work so we could stay in our home town, but it was fruitless.  It was move, or find a new line of work.  I now live in Manitoba, where I continue to work in my chosen field. 

I have a number of friends and colleagues in Nova Scotia.  My thoughts are with them tonight while they start the work of making some very hard decisions - their art and career, or their home. 

Slumberjack

The Liberals are intent on continuing the work of the previous govt in neutralizing as much as possible the effectiveness of public sector bargaining units, and force feeding everyone with an assortment of neoliberal nostrums.

1springgarden

Thanks for that explanation of film biz economics Timebandit, it is entirely consistent with what industry people here are saying about this tax credit cut.

It's a head-scratcher, why would the NS Liberal government chase away this valuable private sector activity?  The film biz is said to be a net tax contributor based on local spending, jobs, multiplier etc.  Also, alienates the young, creative and "urbane" (lol), many of whom voted Liberal last election.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Yeah, I've been in touch with some of your industry members - I'm not sure what the impetus for the cut was.  In SK it was a combination of vendetta, old boys' clubs and resource industry porn.  You also have about twice the number of people working in your film and tv sector than we had in SK. 

Hunky_Monkey

1springgarden wrote:

Re: NS Liberal budget cuts Film Tax Credit, removes cap on tuition

Best tweet on my Twitter:

Quote:
We in @NSNDP warned the young, the creative sector, the FUSION folks. Now the knives are in your backs. I take no pleasure in being right.

It's true that young people, creatives and young-urban-professionals of Halifax abandoned the NS NDP for the Liberals in the last provincial election.  So I was surprised the Liberal budget put the knife to the NS Film Tax Credit which was popular with these people.  At an Easter brunch I spoke with a couple of urbane film biz owners who promised to move out of NS if the Film Tax Credit was cut, not sure if they're packing but they looked genuinely alarmed.

While this $97-million-deficit Liberal budget is semi-tough on a number of interests, there are no tax cuts (some increases even), it maintains core services and it moves NS finances toward the Dexter NDP goal of "Back to Balance".  So it's hard to see what NDP partisans can quibble with except the details? 

Ehh, it seems former NS NDP Finance Minister Graham Steele agrees that the Liberal budget is credible:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/graham-steele-budget-is-credit...

NS NDPers chime in with your assessment.

Not sure if 0.8% increase in the largest budget expenditure is maintaining core services.  We're talking Health.  And then wages will be on the table too.  

And PSE tuition can now be raised as much as the institution wants. Also, income assistance rates are frozen and Community Services jobs have been cut.

So I do see a difference between this government and the previous one.

Progressives who left the NDP to vote for the Liberals are angry.  

sherpa-finn

Hunky_Monkey wrote: Progressives who left the NDP to vote for the Liberals are angry.

Perhaps. But they can hardly claim to be surprised.

Aristotleded24

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Progressives who left the NDP to vote for the Liberals are angry.

What exactly did Dexter to do convince these progressives that the NDP was a party progressives could support in the first place?

Hunky_Monkey

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Progressives who left the NDP to vote for the Liberals are angry.

What exactly did Dexter to do convince these progressives that the NDP was a party progressives could support in the first place?

The NDP expanded dental coverage for kids for example.  That's now gone.  

PSE cap the NDP imposed has now been removed.  PSE institutions can now jack up tuition as much as they want.

The Liberals have cut healthcare funding down to 0.8% which won't meet increase costs.  

And our creative community took a big hit with the film tax credit cut.

Dexter increased income assistance for the first time in 10 years.  Liberals froze it and cut Community Services jobs.  That's a cut too.

So, while Dexter wasn't perfect, you wouldn't have seen this budget from the previous government.  And there is far more pain to come.

Newfoundlander_...

There's been some talk in Newfoundland and Labrador over the last few days about how the government should make changes to the film tax credit to lure industry here from Nova Scotia. Don't know what the chances of it happnening are.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

You'd probably see some companies move over if you did.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

You'd probably see some companies move over if you did.

1springgarden

Yes the Dexter NDP did some good things in government, it's true.  But then this week we were reminded of what pissed off so many in the NDP base, with NDP Finance Minister Graham Steele, now a CBC pundit, giving his qualified thumbs-up to a Liberal austerity budget that unregulates tuition fees and freezes Health funding.

Quote:
The budget delivered today by Finance Minister Diana Whalen gets most things right, takes a few gambles and gets one thing calamitously wrong.  I can look at this budget, having delivered four myself, and say that it is a solid achievement.

When Steele was NDP Finance Minister, a friend who worked at Finance Dept. said about him, "He's a radical", referring to Steele's fixation with austerity policies.  Steele quit as Finance Minister shortly after Dexter signed off raises for Health Care workers.  There was tension in the NDP as competing objectives came into conflict.  Steele was unable to compromise, preferring to take his ball home.  Maybe Dexter will write his own book and tell what Steele was like to work with.

And now "Back to Balance" has become a bad hangover that is preventing the NDP from rebuilding trust and enthusiasm among its base.  It would help if Graham Steele would get off the book, TV and radio circuit, stop preaching the austerity gospel and frankly embarrassing himself as an ex-Minister of a decimated party giving the thumbs up to the successor Liberal govenment's rush-to-balance budget.  Steele as media-pundit could be a problem for the next NDP leadership as they try to build a new party consensus.

For the NS NDP, it's time to move on, starting with a defence of the interests of students and film workers and then a leaderhip convention.

Hunky_Monkey

Liberals also slashing funding to the CNIB, NS Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Feed NS - Metro Food Bank, and other groups.

CNIB responds to Minister Bernard...

CNIB is dismayed by the recent comments made by Nova Scotia Community Services Minister, Joanne Bernard, regarding funding of its essential vision rehabilitation services. The Minister’s comments come on the heels of the provincial government’s recent budget announcement, in which the majority-governing Liberals made significant funding cuts for several community groups, including a 30% funding cut to CNIB

http://tinyurl.com/nj9g8cn

Missing the Dexter NDP government now?  

Aristotleded24

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Liberals also slashing funding to the CNIB, NS Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association, Feed NS - Metro Food Bank, and other groups.

Cutting funding for the CNIB? The level of profanity I would have to use to accurately capture how I feel about that would get me banned from babble!Yell

Hunky_Monkey

The Deaf Advocacy Association of NS may close due to Liberal cuts... 

An advocacy organization for Nova Scotians who are deaf is worried it will have close because of a funding cut.

The Deaf Advocacy Association of Nova Scotia helps people who are deaf find services, find funding for hearing aids, and advocates on their behalf against discrimination, among other things.The Department of Community Services eliminated its funding for 2016-2017 fiscal year. 

"This is going to, in essence, within a year kill the organization," said Linda Quigley, executive director of DAANS. 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/deaf-advocacy-association-of-n...

Hunky_Monkey

The Deaf Advocacy Association of NS may close due to Liberal cuts... 

An advocacy organization for Nova Scotians who are deaf is worried it will have close because of a funding cut.

The Deaf Advocacy Association of Nova Scotia helps people who are deaf find services, find funding for hearing aids, and advocates on their behalf against discrimination, among other things.The Department of Community Services eliminated its funding for 2016-2017 fiscal year. 

"This is going to, in essence, within a year kill the organization," said Linda Quigley, executive director of DAANS. 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/deaf-advocacy-association-of-n...

Hunky_Monkey

Community groups that rely on financial help from Nova Scotia's Department of Health are facing cuts, despite the fact their work is aimed at keeping people healthy and active.

The department has focused on wellness programs for years, as a way to keep rising health care costs in check. It's seen as an investment in the future.

The groups include:
Aids Coalition Cape Breton - Kids First - St George's YouthNet- Chebucto Connections- Antigonish Resource Centre - Free Spirit Therapeutic Riding- Split Rock Learning Centre - Eating Disorders Nova Scotia - Schizophrenia Society of Nova Scotia - Alzheimer's Society - Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia - Rainbow ConneXtions​ - LGBTI support in rural Cape Breton - Hope Blooms - Supporting Knowledge Mobilization and Capacity Building - Be, Think, Feel Aboriginal Mental Health - Resiliency and Youth - High-risk youth recreation therapy

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-cuts-funds-to-heal...

Hunky_Monkey

Update on the Dartmouth South NDP nomination.  It's will be a contested nomination with three candidates.  Marian Manicni, Bill Zebedee and Tracey Livesay are running.

BetterOnTheLeft

Hunky_Monkey wrote:

Update on the Dartmouth South NDP nomination.  It's will be a contested nomination with three candidates.  Marian Manicni, Bill Zebedee and Tracey Livesay are running.

What are peoples thoughts on the candidates?
http://nsndp.ca/daso-candidates

Marian Manicni - Retired lawyer for NS Legal Aid, wife of former MP Peter Mancini (I believe)
Bill Zebedee -  On-site trainer for the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) Big history on working elections and for elected officials
Tracey Livesay - Critical Care Nurse

Whe is likley to win? 

Hunky_Monkey

Seems to be a short window to sign people up.  So the person would have to have good ties with the party and the current membership in Dartmouth South

Zebedee ran in the last municipal election winning 460 votes to the winner's 4,760 votes and placing 5th.

Livesay is new to the party.  The Liberals' actions on healthcare and nurses ecouraged her to step forward and become active.

Mancini is the wife of former MP Peter Mancini.  She was a lawyer with NS Legal Aid. Also, a former party president I believe and former president of the Dartmouth-Cole Harbour NDP.

If you're looking at a by-election, I'd say Mancini would be an overall stronger candidate and probably has stronger ties to the membership.

Orangutan

Any news from the two Cape Breton ridings?

Hunky_Monkey

My sources (haha) say there will be a contested nomination in one riding and the other there should be a big name coming forward.  That's all they could share.

sherpa-finn

And the word out of Dartmouth South tonight is that Marian Mancini has indeed won the (hotly contested) NDP nomination for an upcoming by-election. (Recently elected Liberal incumbent died after sudden illness.)

ETA: Provincially, the riding had been held by the NDP through much of the previous decade. And a by-election win here by the NDP would send the message that the Liberal "honeymoon" is well and truly over. Federally, this riding is also very much in play, held by the NDP (Robert Chisholm) but tilting Liberal if the polls are to be trusted.

Hunky_Monkey

I heard internal polling in Dartmouth shows the NDP has closed the huge gap that occured after 2013.  Also shows Robert Chisholm in a solid position for October.  Thank you, Premier McNeil.  The NS Liberals, much like the Ontario and Quebec Liberals, have caused issues for the federal brand.  

Also would venture to guess that the McNeil Liberals are now making the Dexter NDP look damn good to the universe of voters open to the NDP.

Marian Mancini, a very impressive candidate, has a very good shot of winning back Dartmouth South for the NDP.

Cape Breton ridings are both contested at this point and nominations will be held next week.

Stockholm

Who is running for the NDP nominations in Cape Breton?

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