Achieving growth in the NDP

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alphasix actual
Achieving growth in the NDP

In order for the NDP to grow as a party more emphasis must be placed on courting the middle class.

To often the media focuses on the far left of the party, this often distorts the image of the party much to it's detriment. Our members are often portrayed with less than the respect they are due.

Approaching the middle class will grow our base not just in membership but potential dollars as well. Thus we need a leader who will appeal to that growth potential. If we want to win the next election we need someone who will garner votes not only from NDP members but from all previous untapped sources. That means Liberals and Conservatives.

I think  the best person for this job is Michael Prue.

Jacob Richter

Go ahead.  Methinks the naive class-strugglist "far" left elements that are in the NDP have been silenced by the party machinery, even in this financial crisis.  Canada needs a consistently leftist party to oppose the Blairite party that uses "social-democratic" rhetoric and also oppose the left-social-democratic party that happens to have the "Communist" label.

genstrike

Wow.  This single post shows that Sam Dolgoff was right about everything when he wrote The Labor Party Illusion.

http://flag.blackened.net/liberty/labor-illusion.html

genstrike

Jacob Richter wrote:

Canada needs a consistently leftist party to oppose the Blairite party that uses "social-democratic" rhetoric and also oppose the left-social-democratic party that happens to have the "Communist" label.

Oh, you mean the CPC-ML? Laughing (I kid, I kid)

Jacob Richter

Hehe, an ex-DeLeonist in the US (DeLeonists being a bunch of rather parliamentary maximalists) had this to say about my oppositionist minimum proposals:

 

"Say, that's not a bad program at all. Good work! Especially glad to see emphasis on a shorter work week."

 

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/deleonism-list/message/488

Fidel

alphasix actual wrote:

I think  the best person for this job is Michael Prue.

I think Prue is a good organizer. He gets things done. His idea for distributing more money to riding associations to campaign with earlier in the election year is most excellent. Yes we can.

ottawaobserver

He did a phone-blaster phone-around in Ottawa the other week, and his french was AWFUL.  That kind of rules him out around here, sorry to say.  I have no clear impression of any of them, however, and am looking forward to seeing the debate here this weekend.

V. Jara

I concur with your assessment, Prue's French is awful. That being said, only Bisson appears to have French and he is outstanding in both official languages. As for Prue's ideas on giving $10,000 to each riding association after they have nominated a candidate and also giving the membership an opportunity to play a bigger role in policy making- I am a fan. With the Ontario NDP likely to be in opposition for a while, I would be happy to see a decentralizing leader that will water the grassroots- I think that's what the party needs to grow, at least in the short term. And no, this is not an endorsement of Prue or Bisson. I just hope the leadership campaigns will continue to look at bold ways to greater empower the grassroots and build for the medium term.

adma

alphasix actual wrote:

I think  the best person for this job is Michael Prue.

 

Since this is the federal forum, either your suggestion is misplaced, or you're trying to send a message "up high"...

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Yep, this is in the wrong forum but I'll propose:

 

TAX HIKES!

 

Show Canadians how easy it would be to eliminate child poverty in Canada.  They couldn't object to paying an extra $50 on *average* to eliminate child poverty could they?

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Andrea Horwath!!!

 We saw where the grey-haired, intellect males have gotten us.

 How about an actual in-the-community advocate?

alphasix actual

adma wrote:
alphasix actual wrote:

I think  the best person for this job is Michael Prue.

Since this is the federal forum, either your suggestion is misplaced, or you're trying to send a message "up high"...

Having a dynamic popular provincial leader will certainly help grow the party at the federal level.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

alphasix actual wrote:
Having a dynamic popular provincial leader will certainly help grow the party at the federal level.

Agreed, Go Andrea Horwath!  Please, some new blood, none of the back[stab]room boys.

Change that doesn't change to Liberal.

alphasix actual

Because Andrea is from Hamilton there may be the perception that she is only backed by labour, which can be a real turn off for some middle of the road voters.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Quote:
In order for the NDP to grow as a party more emphasis must be placed on courting the middle class.

You mean like the Liberals? Can you give me an example of a middle-class policy the NDP could champion?

 

Stockholm

"Because Andrea is from Hamilton there may be the perception that she is only backed by labour, which can be a real turn off for some middle of the road voters."

 

That's absurd...and i suppose that since Bisson is from Timmins he must only be backed by miners and lumberjacks??

madmax

This would be a great discussion in the ONDP leadership race. Regardless it is a valid discussion for the Canadian Politics forum.

What about the NDP in the ROC? How do they grow and what are they doing right that the Ontario NDP isn't?

 

It's Me D

It took me a while to realize this discussion was about the Ontario NDP...

But since its here in the Canadian Politics section and madmax just asked a question about the ROC I'll respond:

I know nothing about the Ontario NDP but if you'd like an example of how to build the party through non-threatening centerism I'd suggest the NSNDP... they will be the next government here and I predict it will be very hard to distinguish them from a Liberal government... their approach, in a nutshell, has been to gradually aclimatize the people to the party by never making a fuss about anything or propossing anything that would significantly upset the status quo; they are the responsible opposition, helping the government to do a better job for Nova Scotians... and now that the people are comfortable with the NSNDP as a non-threatening opposition, they will ride the general discontent with the Tories (as opposed to any real enthusiam for the NDP) into office in the next provincial election, in the grand tradition of North American politics.

Its not really a model I'm a fan of, as you can probably tell, but it has grown the party to the point where its really going to form government. 

KenS

There are a number of us who have been involved in the NSNDP from the beginning, who always knew that credibility had to be built, but who did not think that flying under the radar was required.

Its not like its some black and white, rock the boat or don't.

It's Me D

KenS:

Two things, 1) From the beginning? Like the dawn of time? I've been with the NSNDP since before I was old enough to vote, couldn't have been much earlier... 2) Whats your assessment of the NSNDP's rise to power then? Have they compromised enough? Too much? 

alphasix actual

Frustrated Mess wrote:

Quote:
In order for the NDP to grow as a party more emphasis must be placed on courting the middle class.

You mean like the Liberals? Can you give me an example of a middle-class policy the NDP could champion?

Comprehensive health care including dental and a reworking of drug benefits. A great number of people slip through the cracks because they are not rich or poor enough

madmax

The NDP in both Ontario and Sask campaigned on Dental. Not only did it not attract voters (No matter how badly needed it is), the ONDP were ignored because no one believed they would achieve enough power to implement any of their policies (and many were good in 07) and in Sask, I am certain people were wondering.... hey.... you guys have been in power, why are you waiting for a campaign to talk about something you could have done or started.

In the meantime, short of some public sector workers, the middle class is getting squeezed. Those middle class who aren't of retirement age are going to feed up and down the food chain with more falling to the lower middleclass then rising above.

The middle class in Ontario doesn't identify the NDP with them. However, in Ontario the lower and working class are more apt to identify themselves as Conservatives..... if they vote.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

What Madmax said. I recall an Ontario election poll where health care was rated as one of the top two issues and in the same poll most voters said they would vote for the Mike Harris Conservatives.

The NDP has perceptual burdens. One is that it is viewed as the political wing of organized labour. That may be mostly untrue, but it is the perception. Another is that it remains burdened by the spectre of Rae and the ONDP has never purged that era from popular perception. 

 

Fidel

madmax wrote:

This would be a great discussion in the ONDP leadership race. Regardless it is a valid discussion for the Canadian Politics forum.

What about the NDP in the ROC? How do they grow and what are they doing right that the Ontario NDP isn't?

Ontario has traditionally been a conservative party stronghold for five decades in a row with Liberals coming second. The wisdom of voters here has been to vote for old line party one federally and old line party number two provincially - that way we play one government against the other and reap the benefits of playing one against the other, as such wisdom generally goes. 

 Cold war era growth rates propped up conservative popularity as long as the red menace was a threat, and for as long as resources and electrical power were in abundance. That's not true anymore after decades of general mismanagement of provincial and federal economies, and so we have a federal government with 22 percent of registered voter support and another in Queen's Park with the same level of popularity provincially.

 Rae's government was a fluke, really, with overall support for the party returning to what it was in 1985 by 95. The NDP did win and maintain support in Northern Ontario because of Rae's NDP. Since then we've had two more terms of conservative rule and two by the Liberals, and the provincial economy is in tatters, once again.

I think some large minority of voting Ontarians could be ready to elect another NDP government by fluke come 2011. We should be well mired in nation wide recession by then as we were in 1990. 

madmax

Frustrated Mess wrote:

What Madmax said. I recall an Ontario election poll where health care was rated as one of the top two issues and in the same poll most voters said they would vote for the Mike Harris Conservatives.

The NDP has perceptual burdens. One is that it is viewed as the political wing of organized labour. That may be mostly untrue, but it is the perception. Another is that it remains burdened by the spectre of Rae and the ONDP has never purged that era from popular perception. 

 

OK FM.... Get ready for it. I am going to agree with you 100%.  :)  

 

 

 

Jacob Richter

alphasix actual wrote:
Comprehensive health care including dental and a reworking of drug benefits. A great number of people slip through the cracks because they are not rich or poor enough

That "middle class" issue covers the entire working class.  I would also add that at least lifetime benefits need to be indexed to inflation (but of course protected from deflation).