Harper's Chief of Staff cuts Duffy $90,000 personal cheque to repay housing allowance

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NorthReport

This smacks of an attempted coverup, falling on her sword for her wonderful boss.  Give us a break!

And what is she going to get in return for her undivided loyalties to the cause?

‘It’s just a mix-up’: Mike Duffy staffer takes partial blame for faulty claims behind Senate scandal

http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/05/30/its-just-a-mix-up-mike-duffy-sta...

jerrym

I rarely agree with Andrew Coyne, but this is one of those rare times. 

Quote:

Tuesday had a whiff of revolution about it. A question period that actually produced real questions! The Senate internal economy committee, meeting in public! For the first time in who knows how long, there was a sense that somewhere, someone in Ottawa might be held to account for their actions. Don't get too excited. We are a long way from true accountability. Question period can be a useful instrument, particularly as it seems to be one of the few means of getting anyone to go on the record nowadays. But its ability to get at the truth remains distinctly limited, even when led by as skilled an interrogator as Tom Mulcair.

As for that committee hearing, for all the revelations it contained - the expression "triple-dipping" appears to have been invented to describe what Mike Duffy was up to - it raised as many questions. Why did the committee only catch these now, and not before, when it signed off on a much more, shall we say, discreet accounting of his misdeeds? Indeed, it appears he was caught, time and again, by Senate staff, who disallowed many of his claims - yet no penalty followed, nor were any flags raised. Why not? ...

Neither should too much importance be attached to the committee's decision to refer the whole business to the RCMP. The force does not actually have to wait for an invitation from a Senate committee to investigate matters of alleged fraud. The suspicion lingers that, at least on the government side, senators were only too happy to be able to say "it's with the police now, I can't comment," much as, in the Commons, the ethics commissioner's investigation has served as a convenient excuse for ministers to evade questions.

If I sound skeptical that much will come of either, I'm not the only one. In the last week we have heard from a former senior RCMP inspector expressing doubts that the force has sufficient independence from its political masters to investigate this thoroughly and impartially - which should be a shocking charge, but sadly isn't - as well as a warning from the ethics commissioner herself not to expect too much of her inquiry, given her narrow terms of reference.

In addition, we have had complaints from three separate legal or regulatory bodies - the CRTC, Elections Canada and the Federal Court - over the Conservatives' refusal to co-operate with, or indeed outright obstruction of, their investigations into various robocall abuses. The most serious of these, it has now been established, would have required access to the Conservatives' closely guarded voter database. Yet in the face of what would appear, in the best case, to be a massive breach of security, the Conservatives have not only taken no action to find those responsible, but have done their best to frustrate others from doing so.

Which may suggest the real stakes here. The government's multiplying, metastasizing scandals - from Duffy's improper expense claims to the efforts, apparently coordinated between the Prime Minister's Office and senior Tory senators, to cover these up, to the robocalls affair, to the arrest on charges of fraud and money laundering of Arthur Porter, the prime minister's choice for chairman of the Security Intelligence Review Committee - are not, in my view, wholly unrelated.

Rather, they stem from a culture that has taken root among the Conservative hierarchy - a culture of expediency. People don't make ethical choices in isolation. They take their cues from those around and above them. Maybe Duffy's expense padding had its roots in the Senate's historically lax culture: indeed, given the absence of controls on senators' expenses, it would be astonishing if only a couple of senators had succumbed to the temptation this presented.

But the efforts to cover this up, like the obstruction of the robocalls investigation or the curious lack of due diligence in the Porter appointment, are suggestive of something else: a habit of looking the other way at bad behaviour, if not actually encouraging it; and, when it is brought to light, of denying, and minimizing, and explaining it away.

This isn't about a few senators padding their expense accounts, or criminal acts on the part of one or two individuals, or even what the prime minister knew when. It's the whole moral code of this government that's in question. This isn't just a problem, something to be fixed - it's existential. ...

Indeed, if you want to know how a government gets into this kind of mess, you've only to look at how it tries to get out of it. The government persists in thinking this can all be treated as a matter of spin and bluster, much as it has dealt with most problems. But you can't spin your way out of something you spun yourself into. If you are generally perceived as devious and duplicitous, more deviousness and duplicity are not going to help. Only transparency and honesty can. But, as I've said before, if that were what this government were about, we wouldn't be here.

http://www.vancouversun.com/Harper+troubles+rooted+culture+expediency/84...

Coyne may be right that the Con government will spin and bluster its way out of this. However, sooner or later, whether is 2015 or later, all this spin and bluster will destroy the government, as it wears away the trust of the Canadian electorate, just as drops of water can eventually wear down rock. The problem is the process is so glacial. 

Kara

Brachina wrote:
Anyone else find Justin's lisp annoying?

With a seemingly endless and ever growing number of legitimate reasons to criticize JT, criticizing him for a speech impediment over which he has no control is unacceptable, insensitive and unfair.  Many people who have lisps endure a lot of bullying and cruelty, particularly in their youth.

Sean in Ottawa

One problem of course, fair or not, if you have a speech impediment but choose words wisely people will see past it but if what you are saying is inane it is harder becuase the process of speaking and listening makes you pay more attention to each word.

That said Trudeau must be having coaching as there are improvements in his H of C delivery in the last couple weeks. I don't doubt that he will get lots of help. The thing is not to sound like others but find a way that works for yourself and sounds somewhat authoritative. One way to do that is slow your speech slightly -- use shorter sentences of greater impact. Ideas that are complex don't always need complex sentence structure.

I am guessing his delivery will be less of a factor.

Trudeau's real issue will be trying to sound like a grown up of some awareness and experience by next election. He comes across still as early twenties even though he is much older than that. This impression is some of the obvious naivete in word choices, the number of simplistic meaningless things he says, a tone of voice that might be improved but a rather amateurish grasp on much of what he talks about. He might do better being more selective. He does not get helped by overexposure while he is working on delivery etc.

Kara

Going after the content (or more accurately, lack of content) of JT's statements is entirely fair game - he deserves that and more.  However, going after someone's speech impediment is nothing more than childish bullying, is offensive and certainly is not progressive.

Brachina

Yeah that was low on my part, can't allow my hatred of Justin to cloud my judgement like that. Keeping it to policy and character from now on.

Kara

Much respect to you for that Brachina.

bekayne
Brachina

 Thanks Kara, sometimes its good to be called on my shit 

Brachina

Dang, this just keeps on snowballing.

jerrym

The release of e-mails showing that Duffy sought a to be made a minister, get a car etc. raises the question of who leaked this and why. None of the possible leakers are suggestive of the Cons being in a good position. If it comes from Harper's office or other Con under his direction, it suggests that they are worried that Duffy will reveal all he knows about Con operations and want to destroy his credibility first for the mere release of the e-mails helps perpetuate the scandal even though they can argue they gave Duffy nothing. At the same time, as a former political reporter Duffy would not know be perceived as an innocent about how political reward systems work and it therefore raises questions why, even for an ambitious, ego-driven man, Duffy would ask for these if some kind of system did not exist. The problem with this approach is in totally discrediting Duffy is that he has nothing to lose now in speaking out. Firing torpedoes can result in your opponent returning fire if it is not immediately destroyed. In other words, torpedo junction with an even larger explosion. Perpetuating the scandal by doing this is an admission that the first attempt to solve the problem by paying off Duffy's financial abuses has been a total disaster.

Alternative leakers provide no relief for the Cons. If this was a Con who is disgusted with what has happened and he has access to the inside info (highly unlikely), then he/she is unlikely to stop here. if it is a loyal ally who panicked into releasing this in an attempt to destroy Duffy (also highly unlikel), then the tight Con control system that has served themselves so well is breaking down. If it is a hacker who has penetrated the Con communication system again this is not good news. If the e-mails or notes were carelessly left available to prying eyes, the question remains what else do they know and when will they release it. 

In seeing what has happened to Duffy, Michael Sona must be asking whether he should now dump out what he knows about the robo scandal or risk the same happening to him. 

Brachina

http://o.canada.com/2013/05/30/blog-ndp-unveil-top-senate-spenders-durin...

More and more of the Senate gets dragged into this.

Political Junkie

jerrym

More emails have been released on Duffy's attempts to get more Con perks. They reveal that he sought fees, as well expenses, from the Cons in return for campaigning for the Cons.

http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Politics/ID/2388731399/

http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Politics/ID/2388732088/

It's clear its the Cons who are releasing the emails in order to say the problem is all Duffy. Harper also says that he did encounter Duffy once, but not in a formal meeting, where Duffy asked for more perks. Harper says he turned him down.

As noted on Power and Politics by Rob Russo, this opens up whole new avenues of questions for the opposition during QP. It also turns this into an only Duffy versus a Conservative Party problem. In other words, Duffy is now free to attack the Cons with whatever information he has without having to worry about whether he is turning off any Con allies. He has none left. The Cons might win but this is a highly risky strategy on their part. 

janfromthebruce

Pol junkie - great cartoon

jerrym

Great article on the strategy of Mulcair's questioning of Harper on the Senate scandal and new Victoria MP Murray Rankin's important role in the process. 

Quote:

... Elected in a byelection in Victoria in November, the fluently bilingual Rankin is one of Canada's top lawyers. He has fought for gay marriage rights in B.C., acted for governments, industry and First Nations on aboriginal land issues, and has taken a lead role on major environmental court cases in areas like sewage treatment, contaminated sites and environmental assessment. Mulcair - who has for months pointed to Rankin as one of his rising stars and top recruits - invited the rookie MP to question period strategy sessions and asked him to take the seat usually filled by Libby Davies, the deputy leader and Vancouver East MP who was away this week. Rankin's role was akin to a co-counsel or junior counsel at a trial, although Rankin said a larger Mulcair-led parliamentary team of MPs and staff - like the legal team assembled by law firms in advance of major trials - was assembled to prepare questions and go over possible scenarios before the two clashes.

"I consulted Murray on the approach we've taken, and he was very helpful," Mulcair said later. "He's got great reflexes, he's very fast on his feet, and having him beside me has been proven very helpful." Mulcair said he used his experience in the Quebec National Assembly to turn on its ear the traditional way opposition parties turn the heat up on a prime minister in hot water. ...

Instead of following the tradition of a leader asking three or at most five questions, Mulcair used his legal training to play the role of both interrogator and prosecutor. He peppered Harper with 16 questions on Tuesday and another 15 the next day. All were brief and succinct, without the usual flowery preambles intended to catch media attention." The more specific and short the question, the more difficult it is for them to bob and weave and dodge," Mulcair said. As Harper answered questions, Mulcair consulted with B.C. MP and House leader Nathan Cullen, who always sits to the leader's right, and with Rankin on his left.

"Unlike most question periods where it's all set up, it's all stage-managed from the get-go, this was to be a different kind of question period," Rankin said Thursday while seated on a couch in his modest Parliament Hill office. "This was to be a question period where, if he says this, we might say that. We were trying to confer, to basically whisper: 'what about this? What do you think about that?' "

With the NDP caucus under strict orders not to heckle, the sombre silence in the Commons and intense looks on all faces of MPs in both Mulcair's and Harper's background added to the courtroom atmosphere.

"This was like some of the best trials I've attended," Rankin said.

Mulcair's performance received strong media reviews - possibly the best since he became leader last year. ...

But observers were just as quick to note there wasn't anything close to a Harper knockout blow, the kind of confession spilled out by the Nicholson character when he bellowed at prosecutor Cruise: "You can't handle the truth." Rankin, however, said that dramatic scene happened at the end of the film. The clash over senators allegedly cheating on their expense claims, and the role of the former Harper chief aide who wrote one of them a $90,000 personal cheque, is still effectively in "mid-trial." Rankin, in arguing that the interrogation did produce some results, pulled over a document listing Harper's responses that began with lines like "I have no information to that effect" and "to my knowledge."

"These are classic lawyer weasel words and evasive answers that Canadians can see right through." ...

Rankin, 63, has long been involved with politics but has until late last year avoided seeking election because of the young age of his two sons. They are now in their 20s.

He resisted a lobbying effort to get him to seek the provincial NDP leadership before Carole James took that post in 2003.

But he's had more influence than most politicians. Rankin was the key architect of B.C.'s Freedom of Information law, was the lead B.C. government treaty negotiator until Gordon Campbell became Liberal premier in 2001, and most recently advised B.C. NDP leader Adrian Dix on how to challenge Enbridge Inc.'s proposed Northern Gateway oil-sands pipeline to Kitimat.

Rankin has been an admirer of Mulcair dating back to the NDP leader's time as Quebec's environment minister, and he was among a group of British Columbians who endorsed Mulcair's leadership bid after Jack Layton died. Enraged by the federal government's re-writing of federal environment laws and enthusiastic support for oilsands pipelines, he decided to seek office when former Victoria MP Denise Savoie resigned for health reasons last year.

Rankin is also being leaned on by colleagues for advice in his various areas of expertise, and next weekend will travel to B.C. with NDP "intergovernmental aboriginal affairs" critic Romeo Saganash to introduce him to key B.C. players on that file.

Mulcair, who is trying to convince Canadians he's surrounding himself with a team of skilled public administrators, has all but assured Rankin of a cabinet post if the party pulls off the unexpected and wins the 2015 election. "Murray will play a key role when we form government." ...

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Good+Hill/8465932/story.html 

 

Brachina

Rankin sounds like an amazing MP and he'll make a great cabinate minister.

Just out of curiosity who else do you think will make it into cabinate if the NDP wins in 2015.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Not Libby Davies

jerrym

Brachina wrote:
Rankin sounds like an amazing MP and he'll make a great cabinate minister. Just out of curiosity who else do you think will make it into cabinate if the NDP wins in 2015.

If you want to talk about who should be in a possible NDP cabinet if it is elected in 2015, I suggest you move that discussion to an appropriate thread. Otherwise, it is likely to throw this thread into a tangenital topic, something that almost never happens on Babble. 

Brachina

jerrym wrote:

Brachina wrote:
Rankin sounds like an amazing MP and he'll make a great cabinate minister. Just out of curiosity who else do you think will make it into cabinate if the NDP wins in 2015.

If you want to talk about who should be in a possible NDP cabinet if it is elected in 2015, I suggest you move that discussion to an appropriate thread. Otherwise, it is likely to throw this thread into a tangenital topic, something that almost never happens on Babble. 

 LOL good point I'll ask it in the NDP thread.

bekayne

http://globalnews.ca/news/605591/sen-duffy-claimed-per-diem-while-touting-affordable-housing-in-charlottetown/

Duffy also appeared on CTV’s Canada AM from Charlottetown on August 23, to talk about the death of former NDP leader Jack Layton, according to a transcript.

He also tried to bill a per diem that day.

 

jerrym

bekayne wrote:

http://globalnews.ca/news/605591/sen-duffy-claimed-per-diem-while-touting-affordable-housing-in-charlottetown/

Duffy also appeared on CTV’s Canada AM from Charlottetown on August 23, to talk about the death of former NDP leader Jack Layton, according to a transcript.

He also tried to bill a per diem that day.

 

No doubt the Cons will claim that Jack was aiding and abetting Duffy in the billing scandal because of his connection with Duffy's actions on August 23rd.

Michelle

I was watching question period online over radiorahim's shoulder either last night or the night before, can't remember which, where Mulcair was hammering Harper with questions.  I have to say, I was very impressed - he did an amazing job.  Questions short, to the point, calmly delivered, and deadly because he trapped him so many times.  Talk about a cross-examination - you could really see the litigator come out.  It was a brilliant performance.

Sean in Ottawa

Need more of that... I expect Mulcair has been told how this is be received.

Brachina
Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

First, this is a bad link. It leads to a general news page. I have no idea what you think is relevant to this thread on that page.

Second, in my opinion it is not helpful to post a bare link on babble. You should at least provide a sentence or 2 to indicate why any of us might want to read whatever is at the link.

trotwood73

PM's former chief of staff controlled secret Tory fund

Nigel Wright helped create fund 7 years ago

Brachina

First they admitted the slush fund and later said it doesn't exist. Tools.

Lens Solution

BREAKING NEWS: CTV News has obtained RCMP affidavits on Senator Mike Duffy citing “pattern of filing fraudulent expense claims.”

 

BREAKING NEWS: RCMP affidavits obtained by CTV News reveal Senator Mike Duffy is under investigation for breach of trust and fraud.

 

BREAKING NEWS: RCMP affidavits reveal Conservative Party initially planned to repay Duffy’s expenses before Nigel Wright stepped in

 

EXCLUSIVE at 11: @RobertFife will have full details of explosive allegations against Senator Mike Duffy cited in RCMP affidavits

 

VIDEO REPORT by Robert Fife:

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/conservative-party-initially-sought-to-re...

 

https://twitter.com/CTVNationalNews

bekayne

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/commentary/columnists/for-harper-pmo-is-duffy-the-empire-slayer/article13048608/

The documents also allege that Mr. Wright has said that three other staff members within the PMO were aware of the $90,000 cheque, while Mr. Harper was kept in the dark. So what did they talk about around the office? How did this work? Did the Prime Minister think that they were planning a surprise party for him, because everyone stopped talking when he came through?

If Mr. Harper didn’t know about Mr. Wright paying the $90,000, did he know about the plan to use party funds to pay the $32,000? I can’t think of an answer here that makes Mr. Harper look good.

The argument can be made that it’s a chief of staff’s job to make problems go away, yet here the undertaking seems to have been to help the problem stay – in the Senate seat from which Mr. Duffy has raised vast sums for the Conservative Party, while travelling throughout Canada and sometimes claiming the allowance granted senators while they’re performing Senate business in Ottawa.

At what point should Mr. Harper have known? At what point does he become Oscar Wilde’s Happy Prince in the first act, living in a palace, guarded by a great wall, a place where sorrow is not allowed to enter?

“I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything about me was so beautiful,” the Prince said. The story is very sad.

 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Its called plausible deniability.

Policywonk

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Its called plausible deniability.

I think it's pretty implausible deniability. It's a case of he's damned if he did and damned if he didn't know, and it looks good on him.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

I just finished reading the 28 page affidavit by RCMP Corporal Greg Horton. It is surprisingly readable, and is extremely well structured. A few observations:

1. This Horton is a very smart guy, and a very expert detective. I hope he never investigates me.

2. Duffy is screwed. If the prosecutors want to put him in jail, they can easily do so.

3. Wright is also probably screwed, although his wealth and position will help him to avoid the worst consequences.

4. Duffy is unlikely to be courageous about this, so if there is anything he knows that could incriminate other Cons, he will definitely reveal it. This could cause a general panic amongst the Cons, and who knows what will happen then?

5. Wright, although much less exposed than Duffy, is also much more intelligent and well connected. He hasn't talked to the RCMP yet, but he had 2 of his lawyers talk to them. When he is interviewed, he will most likely reveal anything he knows that could possibly shift the blame from his shoulders.

6. Harper clearly lied by saying that Wright had not informed anyone else in the PMO about the $90K payment to Duffy.

In general, it is wonderful that the MSM were able to get the court to release this document, and we will be seeing stories about it for quite some time. Also, whenever parliament reconvenes, this will allow Mulcair to resume his prosecutorial mien in Question Period. Good times.

knownothing knownothing's picture

Policywonk wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Its called plausible deniability.

I think it's pretty implausible deniability. It's a case of he's damned if he did and damned if he didn't know, and it looks good on him.

How about undeniable implausibility?

Unionist

knownothing wrote:

How about undeniable implausibility?

Nailed it!

 

Lens Solution

PMO withholding email about Wright-Duffy deal from RCMP: sources

 

Robert Fife's latest story:

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/pmo-withholding-email-about-wright-duffy-...

Lens Solution

RCMP alleges Duffy changed bank address after Senate audit announced

Thursday, August 8, 2013

The RCMP alleges that Sen. Mike Duffy changed his banking address from Ontario to Prince Edward Island shortly after the Senate announced an internal audit of each senator’s primary residence.

New court documents filed Thursday show that the Mounties are seeking documents from Royal Bank and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce for its investigation into the expense claims filed by Duffy.

Cpl. Greg Horton wants credit card statements from CIBC, and credit card and bank account statements from RBC. Horton is also requesting from RBC a mortgage application and, “a list of all address changes in relation to any account solely or jointly in the name of Michael (Mike) Duffy” registered to his Ottawa or P.E.I. homes.

Horton says a report from FINTRAC, Canada’s “finance intelligence unit” that operates independently of the federal government, shows Duffy changed his banking address “from an Ontario address to a P.E.I. address “on December 10, 2012.

“The date coincides with the timing of the December 6, 2012 Senate announcement of an internal audit pertaining to primary and secondary residency of all Senators,” Horton says.

 

More here:

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/rcmp-alleges-duffy-changed-bank-address-a...

Lens Solution

Robert Fife has a new report out tonight on the latest revelations in the Duffy scandal!

 

Monday, August 26, 2013 10:00PM EDT

 

Wright worked with 2 Conservative senators to reach Duffy deal, emails show

Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s ex-chief of staff worked closely with two Conservative senators to persuade Sen. Mike Duffy to pretend to repay $90,000 in invalid expenses with his own money, emails show.

The emails, seen by CTV’s Ottawa Bureau Chief Robert Fife, reveal that Harper’s former right-hand man, Nigel Wright, consulted with David Tkachuk and Carolyn Stewart Olsen – two senators who were overseeing what was supposed to be an independent audit of Duffy’s expenses.

In May, Fife revealed that Wright had personally bailed out Duffy by writing him a $90,000 cheque to cover his improperly claimed expenses. Harper and his office have insisted that Wright acted alone, but the latest emails suggest otherwise.

Those emails show that Duffy had initially refused to go along with the plan to repay the taxpayer-funded living allowance and other expenses using Wright’s money.

The embattled senator was then threatened with the loss of his seat in the upper chamber.

--------

More details:

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/wright-worked-with-2-conservative-senator...

Lens Solution

Both Tim Harper and John Ivison are reporting that Mike Duffy may be starting to go nuclear on Harper & the Conservative Senators and take down whoever he can:

 

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/08/28/stephen_harpers_lone_gunma...

 

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2013/08/28/harpers-tories-expected-m...

Lens Solution

RCMP's Senate expenses probe focuses on Duffy-Wright deal

 

Exclusive details reveal seriousness of Mounties' Parliament Hill investigation

 

Sep 3, 2013

 

CBC's Greg Weston's latest report:

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/09/03/pol-senate-rcmp-investi...

Lens Solution

The plot thickens . . .

------

Mike Duffy visited PMO days after housing claims referred to auditors, documents show

SEPTEMBER 17, 2013

OTTAWA — Just days after his housing claims were sent to auditors for review, Sen. Mike Duffy paid a visit to the building that houses the Prime Minister’s Office, which includes the office of Stephen Harper and his then-chief of staff Nigel Wright.

The day after Duffy visited the Langevin Block, two top Conservative senators visited the same room Duffy had been in. One was Sen. David Tkachuk, the chairman of the committee overseeing the audit of Duffy’s expenses; the other was Sen. Irving Gerstein, the head of the Conservative party’s war chest.

Duffy’s almost 50-minute visit to a room in the building on Monday, Feb. 11, came on the heels of a Senate decision Friday Feb. 8 to refer his housing claims to independent auditor Deloitte. Hours after Duffy visited the Langevin Block, party leaders in the Senate released a joint statement saying that any senator found to have broken the upper chamber’s spending rules should repay every cent plus interest.

It was not known who Duffy met with on the Monday. But Tkachuk confirmed that his own visit in the same room — believed to be a meeting room — the next day was with Wright, the top PMO staffer who later resigned after giving Duffy about $90,000 to help him pay back his housing expenses. The RCMP are investigating that transaction.

Tkachuk’s and Gerstein’s Tuesday visits were followed by a brief talk Wednesday between Duffy and the prime minister. That chat, which took place in the Conservative caucus room right after a caucus meeting, saw Duffy unsuccessfully plead his case against having to repay any of his housing claims.

---------

Read more:

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/national/Mike+Duffy+visited+days+after...

Lens Solution

RCMP allege Duffy paid friend $65K for 'little or no apparent work'

 

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

 

The RCMP is seeking more bank records as it investigates allegations that embattled Sen. Mike Duffy paid a friend $65,000 under a Senate-funded contract to carry out work that the Mounties allege “was of little or no value.”

RCMP Cpl. Greg Horton alleges in an affidavit filed in court Tuesday that Duffy hired the friend, identified as Gerald Donohue, as a consultant to carry out research and speech-writing work.

 

-------

Robert Fife's latest report on the Duffy scandal:

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/rcmp-allege-duffy-paid-friend-65k-for-lit...

 

 

Brachina

Lens Solution wrote:

RCMP allege Duffy paid friend $65K for 'little or no apparent work'

 

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

 

The RCMP is seeking more bank records as it investigates allegations that embattled Sen. Mike Duffy paid a friend $65,000 under a Senate-funded contract to carry out work that the Mounties allege “was of little or no value.”

RCMP Cpl. Greg Horton alleges in an affidavit filed in court Tuesday that Duffy hired the friend, identified as Gerald Donohue, as a consultant to carry out research and speech-writing work.

 

-------

Robert Fife's latest report on the Duffy scandal:

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/rcmp-allege-duffy-paid-friend-65k-for-lit...

 

 

 

 Mike Duffy the gift that keeps on giving.

 

 

Lens Solution

Craig Scott, MP (Toronto-Danforth) and Official Opposition Critic for Democratic and Parliamentary Reform discusses new RCMP allegations against Senator Mike Duffy

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJ1EJG2qT9k

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