Justin Trudeau's Family Home Broken Into While Wife And Children Slept

169 posts / 0 new
Last post
laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I doubt the intruder even knew who was or wasn't in the house. Sometimes very drunk and/or stoned people do stupid things that they think are clever or funny.

I'm guessing the 19 year old made his way in through the kitchen door thinking it was his own home. Once in the kitchen - a place where both knives and note paper/pen are probably in plain view - he figured out he was not a at home and decided to pull a "funny" before leaving.

Of course, it would be at minimum unnerving to realize a stranger had walked into your place and made themselves somewhat at home. And without further knowledge of the circumstances, it would be easy enough to wonder whether it was meant as a threatening gesture. I'm glad the case was solved and the family can rest in peace knowing that stranger is not stalking them or coming back to do something more heinous.

But seriously, a Victim's Impact Statement? Call it a wedge issue but victims' rights has as much credibility in my books as men's rights. Right wing fabrication of some kind of oppression that doesn't exist.

Pondering

You know, if you take the comment in context, the poster probably intended to say "should have checked with the family " before deciding not to press charges. I suspect the police did check with the family and that it is Justin and Sophie who decided not to press charges.

At least I assume if someone came into my home in the middle of the night and did that it would be up to me to decide whether or not I wanted to press charges.

He knew he was in the wrong home and briefly considered stealing before deciding to leave a threatening note, and yes, when you leave a note with multiple butcher knives it's threatening and terrorizing.

Unionist

There's no such thing as "pressing charges". That decision is up to the crown. There were no grounds to believe a criminal act had been committed or that prosecution could be successful.

Pondering

Unionist wrote:
There's no such thing as "pressing charges". That decision is up to the crown. There were no grounds to believe a criminal act had been committed or that prosecution could be successful.

A criminal act was committed. He entered someone's home without permission in the middle of the night. If he is telling the truth and he entered accidently then he should have left as soon as he realized it. If he was just trying to leave a friendly reminder to lock the doors there was no need to use multiple butcher knives.

He is lucky to be getting off the hook. I guess he comes from a good part of town and has a promising future so giving him a record would be mean. There is no doubt in my mind that if his background were different so would the outcome be.

jjuares

Pondering wrote:

Unionist wrote:
There's no such thing as "pressing charges". That decision is up to the crown. There were no grounds to believe a criminal act had been committed or that prosecution could be successful.

A criminal act was committed. He entered someone's home without permission in the middle of the night. If he is telling the truth and he entered accidently then he should have left as soon as he realized it. If he was just trying to leave a friendly reminder to lock the doors there was no need to use multiple butcher knives.

He is lucky to be getting off the hook. I guess he comes from a good part of town and has a promising future so giving him a record would be mean. There is no doubt in my mind that if his background were different so would the outcome be.


The decision to lay charges is not (or should not be) a simple evaluation of whether a crime was committed. Other factors come into play such as whether or not it is the public interest to lay charges.

Unionist

Pondering wrote:

A criminal act was committed. He entered someone's home without permission in the middle of the night.

You and your hero Harper Trudeau apparently think this young man is guilty of a criminal act. The policy don't even think they have enough grounds to ask the crown to lay a charge. I'm on the side of the young man.

Quote:
If he is telling the truth and he entered accidently then he should have left as soon as he realized it.

You're excited at the prospect of a trial which will never take place, judging his "testimony" which you haven't heard, and condemning him as a criminal! You scare the shit out of me.

Quote:
If he was just trying to leave a friendly reminder to lock the doors there was no need to use multiple butcher knives.

What was Trudeau's household doing with multiple butcher knives? Planning a terrorization attack? Stabbing multiple butchers?? This bears investigation.

Quote:
He is lucky to be getting off the hook.

Your meat metaphors are waxing wearisome.

Quote:
I guess he comes from a good part of town and has a promising future so giving him a record would be mean. There is no doubt in my mind that if his background were different so would the outcome be.

There's no doubt in your mind. I'll go along with that assertion.

 

wage zombie

Debater wrote:

Yes, Harper better hope that IF the RCMP finds out who did this, it isn't some Conservative staffer-type like Michael Sona or someone with a Conservative Party membership.

Harper has fostered an atmosphere of hate and negativity, and even if he wasn't personally involved, he could be held responsible for the public.

Aristotleded24

jjuares wrote:
Pondering wrote:

Unionist wrote:
There's no such thing as "pressing charges". That decision is up to the crown. There were no grounds to believe a criminal act had been committed or that prosecution could be successful.

A criminal act was committed. He entered someone's home without permission in the middle of the night. If he is telling the truth and he entered accidently then he should have left as soon as he realized it. If he was just trying to leave a friendly reminder to lock the doors there was no need to use multiple butcher knives.

He is lucky to be getting off the hook. I guess he comes from a good part of town and has a promising future so giving him a record would be mean. There is no doubt in my mind that if his background were different so would the outcome be.

The decision to lay charges is not (or should not be) a simple evaluation of whether a crime was committed. Other factors come into play such as whether or not it is the public interest to lay charges.

Even if charges had been filed and the man had been convicted, there are a whole range of sentences the court could have used that don't involve the "lock-em-up-and-throw-away-the-key" mentality. Any combination of fines, probation, community service, conditional sentences, whatever. Some sentencing options wouldn't even leave a permanent mark on this man's record. As to how someone wanders into someone else's home allegedly leaving threatening notes and it's not in the public interest to press charges, that logic does puzzle me a bit.

Pondering

Unionist wrote:
You and your hero Harper Trudeau apparently think this young man is guilty of a criminal act. The policy don't even think they have enough grounds to ask the crown to lay a charge. I'm on the side of the young man. 

Unless you have  a quote from Trudeau you are on the side of smearing people and if it happened to a union organizer you would be having fits of indignation and calling for a hanging so spare me your fake compassion for the young man.  You just want to use him to attack Trudeau (and me).

Unionist wrote:
You're excited at the prospect of a trial which will never take place, judging his "testimony" which you haven't heard, and condemning him as a criminal! You scare the shit out of me.

You creep me out for launching false personal attacks against people you disagree with politically.  I never said anything about a trial. I didn't even say they should press charges.  Saying jay walking is a crime or speeding is a crime isn't "condemning someone as a criminal!" as you put it. Your histrionics are ridiculous.

 

jjuares

Aristotleded24 wrote:

jjuares wrote:
Pondering wrote:

Unionist wrote:
There's no such thing as "pressing charges". That decision is up to the crown. There were no grounds to believe a criminal act had been committed or that prosecution could be successful.

A criminal act was committed. He entered someone's home without permission in the middle of the night. If he is telling the truth and he entered accidently then he should have left as soon as he realized it. If he was just trying to leave a friendly reminder to lock the doors there was no need to use multiple butcher knives.

He is lucky to be getting off the hook. I guess he comes from a good part of town and has a promising future so giving him a record would be mean. There is no doubt in my mind that if his background were different so would the outcome be.

The decision to lay charges is not (or should not be) a simple evaluation of whether a crime was committed. Other factors come into play such as whether or not it is the public interest to lay charges.

Even if charges had been filed and the man had been convicted, there are a whole range of sentences the court could have used that don't involve the "lock-em-up-and-throw-away-the-key" mentality. Any combination of fines, probation, community service, conditional sentences, whatever. Some sentencing options wouldn't even leave a permanent mark on this man's record. As to how someone wanders into someone else's home allegedly leaving threatening notes and it's not in the public interest to press charges, that logic does puzzle me a bit.


Go to Huffington Post and you will see that the threatening note article was bogus. He didn't even know whose house he was in according to the police.

Debater

Unionist is normally more objective.  This story seems to have set him off for some reason.  I think we've discussed it fairly extensively.

As for Sophie Grégoire, she probably does lock the doors most of the time.  Maybe she forgot to lock one on this occasion.  She was taking care of 3 little kids and may have been preoccupied.  Ask anyone with little kids how much of a handful they are and that sometimes you forget things.  I'm sure she'll remember from now on after this incident.

The Crown is more likely to lay charges if the owners of a house want them to.  They are more likely to drop charges if the owners don't want to pursue the case.  It sounds like Justin & Sophie are okay with this guy not being charged.  I remember that when Svend Robinson stole a ring back in 2003, the owners of the store asked the police not to lay charges because they felt it was best to let the matter go and for Svend to get help in other ways rather than pursuing charges.

As for the RCMP, it's hard to know the way they make decisions.  They've decided to charge Mike Duffy with 31 criminal counts, and not a single one for Nigel Wright.  When it comes to the law there's always a certain amount of flexibility involved in the laying of charges.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Your memory is not very good about Svend. While the owners did ask fo him not to be charged he was anyways and plead guilty.  The sentence took into account his mental health.

Quote:

While the auction company publicly stated that they did not wish to pursue charges, Robinson was charged and pleaded guilty. The Crown and defence both agreed that he was undergoing major personal stress and mental health issues at the time; Robinson was given a discharge, meaning that he would have no criminal record, but he volunteered for some time at the Burnaby Wildlife Centre as part of a public service commitmen

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svend_Robinson

Pondering

jjuares wrote:
Go to Huffington Post and you will see that the threatening note article was bogus. He didn't even know whose house he was in according to the police.

Not knowing whose house he was in doesn't make what he did okay.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/08/26/justin-trudeau-break-in-rcmp-pol...

Cops asked the Liberal leader's office if Trudeau wanted to lay charges but sources said the Liberals wanted to leave it up to the police.

A 19-year-old man .... was very intoxicated at the time of the break-in

The man turned himself into police on Friday after photos of him from security cameras were circulated to the media.

 the man initially considered stealing some items, including knives from the Trudeaus' kitchen, but decided against it

"He decided to leave a note behind for the homeowners."

He told police he was supposed to stay with a friend who promised to leave the door open

The man told investigators he wanted to steal knives he collected once inside the residence, but couldn't bring himself to do it. He instead left a note atop a pile of knives so that it would be found, a source said. He also moved some speakers around.

....................................................................................................................................................................

He realized very quickly that he was in the wrong house and instead of turning around and leaving he moved speakers around and considered stealing the knives and other items. He spent some time looking around deciding what to steal.

At 19, he was old enough and given his activities in the house sober enough to know that any homeowner would be frightened by a note warning them to lock their doors sitting on a pile of knives. He didn't write the note on the pile of knives. He moved to note to it.

The man considered robbing the house, either thought better of it or didn't find enough valuables he could sell, so he decided to play a prank by leaving a frightening note.

He did not turn himself in until the video was published. When he realized he might get caught he stepped forward, probably with a lawyer in tow given the neighbourhood we are talking about.

Portraying him as some naive barely legal passerby who entered the house accidently blind drunk and left as soon as he realized he was in the wrong house is whitewashing his actions. That it wasn't politically motivated doesn't make it okay.

Debater

My memory is pretty good, actually.  We discussed the case in my legal circle at the time.  I correctly remembered that the owners decided not to press charges against Svend.  I didn't follow the final details of the case after that, and so was going by what I remembered up to that point.

Anyway, as someone else has just posted above, it sounds like Justin & Sophie were asked for their input, and they said they would trust the RCMP to make the correct decision.  So that should make Unionist feel better.  He was arguing that Justin wanted this guy charged, and it appears that is not the case. 

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Your memory is not very good about Svend. While the owners did ask fo him not to be charged he was anyways and plead guilty.  The sentence took into account his mental health.

Quote:

While the auction company publicly stated that they did not wish to pursue charges, Robinson was charged and pleaded guilty. The Crown and defence both agreed that he was undergoing major personal stress and mental health issues at the time; Robinson was given a discharge, meaning that he would have no criminal record, but he volunteered for some time at the Burnaby Wildlife Centre as part of a public service commitmen

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svend_Robinson

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I remember because I was on his executive when it happened.  We had hoped that because the owner didn't want charges brought against him that they might not be laid but the RCMP instead laid charges that could have led to a jail sentence.

The teenager was guilty of being too drunk to know where he was.  I guess for some people that is enough to make him a criminal however for the police it was enough to believe he had no intent to break and enter and thought he was entering a house that was left unlocked specifically for him.  Since a break and enter requires mens rea (intent) he wasn't charged.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:
The teenager was guilty of being too drunk to know where he was.  I guess for some people that is enough to make him a criminal however for the police it was enough to believe he had no intent to break and enter and thought he was entering a house that was left unlocked specifically for him.  Since a break and enter requires mens rea (intent) he wasn't charged.

Days later after a video surfaced the MAN, he is 19 not 13, came forward and he did not claim he was too drunk to know where he was. He knew he wasn't in his friend's place when he decided to rob the house rather than leaving and he wasn't too drunk to write a note and place it on a pile of knives.

I've been drunk and if I am too drunk to know right from wrong then I am also too drunk to write a friendly note and leave it on a stack of knives never mind doing it quietly.

Debater

You're right that this wasn't some little kid - he is over the age of 18, and is an adult, not a Young Offender.  And his behaviour is suspicious and rather odd, to say the least.  It's pretty odd to end up in the house of a major political leader without realizing it and leave out knives & a weird note.

To his credit, this guy did turn himself into the police when he saw the surveillance video.  Maybe he did it before they caught up with him, but at least he came forward.  According to my father who knows someone in the police, the RCMP gave this individual a very extensive questioning over the past day.  So they seemed satisfied that he didn't have any political motivation to target a party leader or anything along those lines.

But I agree that it is very strange, and if you look on social media, many other Canadians find it odd, as well.  Anyway, hopefully all the leaders will remain safe from now and throughout the next election and beyond.

Aristotleded24

Pondering wrote:
I've been drunk and if I am too drunk to know right from wrong then I am also too drunk to write a friendly note and leave it on a stack of knives never mind doing it quietly.

Not only is being drunk not accepted as a defense by the courts, but abstaining from alcohol is one of the most common conditions a judge imposes on someone as part of sentencing.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

You know,I just saw our JUstice Minister posing in an NFA shirt.

It's official,the Conservatives are the Tea Party,an uncompromising,hyper partisan social conservative party that governs exclusively to its base.Canada's REpublican party and Harper wants it to be 1983 and be Reagan.They are extremists.

Stop comparing them to the Liberals.

The Liberals for all their faults are not nearly as extreme as the Harpercons.Not even close.

At least the Liberals try to cater to both sides and doesn't just appeal solely to their base.

And until I see Trudeau posing in an NFA t-shirt,the Liberals are NOT the Tea Party.

 

lagatta

Sometimes they add it for absolutely no reason, as for some of us who were involved in a union organising drive and protracted strike over 30 years ago. (All charges dropped later on).

I don't think any of us really respected that, except one who was pregnant. But none of us were of the "drunk and rowdy" type in any event.

This thing reeks of classism - young twit from Rockcliffe Park.

jjuares

Pondering wrote:

jjuares wrote:
Go to Huffington Post and you will see that the threatening note article was bogus. He didn't even know whose house he was in according to the police.

Not knowing whose house he was in doesn't make what he did okay.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/08/26/justin-trudeau-break-in-rcmp-pol...

Cops asked the Liberal leader's office if Trudeau wanted to lay charges but sources said the Liberals wanted to leave it up to the police.

A 19-year-old man .... was very intoxicated at the time of the break-in

The man turned himself into police on Friday after photos of him from security cameras were circulated to the media.

 the man initially considered stealing some items, including knives from the Trudeaus' kitchen, but decided against it

"He decided to leave a note behind for the homeowners."

He told police he was supposed to stay with a friend who promised to leave the door open

The man told investigators he wanted to steal knives he collected once inside the residence, but couldn't bring himself to do it. He instead left a note atop a pile of knives so that it would be found, a source said. He also moved some speakers around.

....................................................................................................................................................................

He realized very quickly that he was in the wrong house and instead of turning around and leaving he moved speakers around and considered stealing the knives and other items. He spent some time looking around deciding what to steal.

At 19, he was old enough and given his activities in the house sober enough to know that any homeowner would be frightened by a note warning them to lock their doors sitting on a pile of knives. He didn't write the note on the pile of knives. He moved to note to it.

The man considered robbing the house, either thought better of it or didn't find enough valuables he could sell, so he decided to play a prank by leaving a frightening note.

He did not turn himself in until the video was published. When he realized he might get caught he stepped forward, probably with a lawyer in tow given the neighbourhood we are talking about.

Portraying him as some naive barely legal passerby who entered the house accidently blind drunk and left as soon as he realized he was in the wrong house is whitewashing his actions. That it wasn't politically motivated doesn't make it okay.

I didn't say not knowing whose house made it okay. But it makes it less likely he was threatening Trudeau. Even you can follow that simple piece of logic.

Pondering

jjuares wrote:
I didn't say not knowing whose house made it okay. But it makes it less likely he was threatening Trudeau. Even you can follow that simple piece of logic.

I never claimed he was threatening Trudeau. I'm saying it remains a crime despite the fact that he was not targeting Trudeau.

I could well imagine myself accidently entering the wrong home while drunk and freaking out once I realized I was in a stranger's home at which point I would quietly get the hell out with my heart pounding for fear of getting caught.

What I would not do is check out the butcher knives and speakers before leaving a warning note sitting on a stack of knives.

What he did was criminal and if he came from a different neighbourhood he would not have gotten off so lightly and with his name kept out of the press.

addictedtomyipod

This whole incident seems filled with intended misinformation and misdirection tactics by the media and police.

If there were any threat whatsoever, there would have been charges of mischief.  Since the RCMP were only to happy to let him off the hook then there were none.  Althia Raj also stated that the handwriting appeared very feminine.  She thought it was written by a woman.  Does anyone know if we can see the actual note anywhere?  Was the note threatening or not?  Where was the video clip attained from?  Why was the identity of the young 19 yr old kept quiet? He is not a minor. Just vague explanations intended to make this all go away very quickly.

Was there even an intruder?  There is a reason it doesn't make any common sense.

Unionist

A number of babblers have mentioned the RCMP. Not sure why. This report was within the jurisdiction of the Ottawa police. They investigated, and they're the ones who decided there were no grounds to lay criminal charges.

I asked a number of unanswered questions from the start. The main one was: Who went to the media with this non-story? Stories don't leak themselves.

jjuares

Pondering wrote:

jjuares wrote:
I didn't say not knowing whose house made it okay. But it makes it less likely he was threatening Trudeau. Even you can follow that simple piece of logic.

I never claimed he was threatening Trudeau. I'm saying it remains a crime despite the fact that he was not targeting Trudeau.

I could well imagine myself accidently entering the wrong home while drunk and freaking out once I realized I was in a stranger's home at which point I would quietly get the hell out with my heart pounding for fear of getting caught.

What I would not do is check out the butcher knives and speakers before leaving a warning note sitting on a stack of knives.

What he did was criminal and if he came from a different neighbourhood he would not have gotten off so lightly and with his name kept out of the press.

Do you have any evidence that he was not charged due to his neighbourhood or are you just guessing .? Never mind. That is called a rhetorical question.

thorin_bane

Unionist wrote:
A number of babblers have mentioned the RCMP. Not sure why. This report was within the jurisdiction of the Ottawa police. They investigated, and they're the ones who decided there were no grounds to lay criminal charges. I asked a number of unanswered questions from the start. The main one was: Who went to the media with this non-story? Stories don't leak themselves.

Good question, again the timing and source is suspect given all the oddities surrounding this case. I did a google check and they all had the story at the same time Aug 16th I politics was the first to release it via Canadian Press.

Justin Trudeau says he and his family are "extremely troubled" after their Ottawa home was broken into Saturday morning while his wife and children slept.

The Liberal leader himself was working in Winnipeg at the time.

"Obviously we're extremely troubled with this," Trudeau said in Montreal.

"My family has decided they're actually coming to join me in Montreal today because they don't want to stay in the house tonight."

Liberal party spokeswoman Kate Purchase said that everyone in the family is safe and nobody was harmed.

Purchase says to her knowledge, nothing was taken.

A threatening note was reportedly left on the premises.

Ottawa police and RCMP are investigating, but would not comment.

"We’re a little bit rattled but we’re hoping that investigation and security will keep us safe," Trudeau said.

Thats it the whole presser. Then came the RCMP and a 2 week narrative about the incident. Remember when Clement saved a drowning vistem. It was in the news for about 3 days after the holidays(I think it was the holidays) and then it disappeared. You would think that saving someones life would be more news worthy than say a break in that nothing happened. How did the drunk guy who was so drunk that he didn't realize he was in the wrong house be able to write a note, and why would he bother?

I highly doubt rockcliffe looks the same as the houses around it. Likely unique architecture. Here is a pic of what is believed to be Trudeaus home. LOL believed like the media has no idea where the house is? http://i.cbc.ca/1.2740106.1408494006!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivative... Now I look to the left and the house looks very different. Perhaps the house on the right looks identical. But again I doubt this neighbourhood has the belly button homes we call to mind with the 'every(wo)man' has in the suburbs.

pookie

addictedtomyipod wrote:

If there were any threat whatsoever, there would have been charges of mischief.  

No, there wouldn't have been.  Not necessarily.

pookie

The other day I woke up and realized I left the mudroom door unlocked all night.  I live in Old Ottawa South, not nearly as tony as Rockcliffe, but nice enough.

Guess I'm lucky nobody entered my home and emptied the knife cabinet and wrote me a note.

The slams against Sophie Gregoire by some people including on this thread are disgusting.

Sean in Ottawa

pookie wrote:

addictedtomyipod wrote:

If there were any threat whatsoever, there would have been charges of mischief.  

No, there wouldn't have been.  Not necessarily.

 

I have to agree. Charges are laid when there is an interest in prosecution and a reasonable chance of success. There may be reasons to explain the intruder's actions that suggest that there is no public interest in a prosecution. This does not mean that the Trudeua family had no reason to be fearful.

thorin_bane

I never said they did or didn't just how this story is laid out is odd. And as mentioned if you are known to have commited a B&E (which doesn't inlcude robbery) you get charged, regardless. I know a had enough friends in low places.  But somehow this isn't a B&E since he was drunk and the door was unlocked? Can we have a little more critical thinking. I mean I know occrums razor and all, but really?

Sean in Ottawa

Ok -- I'll share a personal experience. I had someone walk through my front door many years ago when I was living in Hull. He was drunk and thought he was going into someone else's house. He did not break anything and had no idea that he was unwelcome until he was standing drunk and confused in my kitchen. After talking to him for a few minutes I did not even call the police as I concluded that I believed his explanation and did not think he was using that as cover in case of being caught. It also seemed like he might even have been in the right house but that his friend had moved away a couple years before I moved in...

In any case while he entered the house in what could technically be called a B&E, there was no way I was going to use the police to resolve that situation. I suspect if they had it would not have gone very far.

Now, I admit he did not get as far as my cutlery.

 

Pondering

I appreciate your voice of sanity pookie. It turns out the incident was less serious than it first appeared to be but it wasn't nothing. The Trudeau's were naturally concerned. The media sensationlized which is normal.

Pondering

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Ok -- I'll share a personal experience. I had someone walk through my front door many years ago when I was living in Hull. He was drunk and thought he was going into someone else's house. He did not break anything and had no idea that he was unwelcome until he was standing drunk and confused in my kitchen. After talking to him for a few minutes I did not even call the police as I concluded that I believed his explanation and did not think he was using that as cover in case of being caught. It also seemed like he might even have been in the right house but that his friend had moved away a couple years before I moved in...

In any case while he entered the house in what could technically be called a B&E, there was no way I was going to use the police to resolve that situation. I suspect if they had it would not have gone very far.

Now, I admit he did not get as far as my cutlery.

But this guy did know he was in the wrong house, and did contemplate robbing the place which is why he took the knives and moved the speakers. He changed his mind and decided to write the note but I don't think it was a friendly reminder. I think it was intended to give them a scare as a prank but he didn't want to admit it.

Wandering into the wrong house drunk is an honest error, what you do once you get inside is no longer accidental once you discover you are in the wrong home.

Pondering

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Ok -- I'll share a personal experience. I had someone walk through my front door many years ago when I was living in Hull. He was drunk and thought he was going into someone else's house. He did not break anything and had no idea that he was unwelcome until he was standing drunk and confused in my kitchen. After talking to him for a few minutes I did not even call the police as I concluded that I believed his explanation and did not think he was using that as cover in case of being caught. It also seemed like he might even have been in the right house but that his friend had moved away a couple years before I moved in...

In any case while he entered the house in what could technically be called a B&E, there was no way I was going to use the police to resolve that situation. I suspect if they had it would not have gone very far.

Now, I admit he did not get as far as my cutlery.

But this guy did know he was in the wrong house, and did contemplate robbing the place which is why he took the butcher knives, not cutlery, and moved the speakers. He changed his mind and decided to write the note but I don't think it was a friendly reminder. I think it was intended to give them a scare as a prank but he didn't want to admit it.

Wandering into the wrong house drunk is an honest error, what you do after you get inside is no longer accidental once you discover you are in the wrong home.

Unionist

So, was it the police who broke this story to the media, and then Ms Purchase responded? Or vice versa?

Debater

pookie wrote:

The other day I woke up and realized I left the mudroom door unlocked all night.  I live in Old Ottawa South, not nearly as tony as Rockcliffe, but nice enough.

Guess I'm lucky nobody entered my home and emptied the knife cabinet and wrote me a note.

The slams against Sophie Gregoire by some people including on this thread are disgusting.

Yup.  It's reflective of the type of low attacks on the Liberals that we usually see here.

As you say yourself, anyone can forget to lock a door once in a while.  Particularly when your spouse is away and you are left taking care of 3 little kids.  Any parent of little kids will tell you that you often can't think straight sometimes when you're running around all day.

And apparently there was a nanny in the house with Sophie.  Perhaps she was the one who forgot to lock the door.

In any event, I'm sure they'll be more careful in the future.

pookie

thorin_bane wrote:

I never said they did or didn't just how this story is laid out is odd. And as mentioned if you are known to have commited a B&E (which doesn't inlcude robbery) you get charged, regardless. I know a had enough friends in low places.  But somehow this isn't a B&E since he was drunk and the door was unlocked? Can we have a little more critical thinking. I mean I know occrums razor and all, but really?

The police's reasoning about the legal aspect of this is laid out by kropoktin in post #115.

I don't buy the mens rea argument as applied to the guy's own story of what he did/thought once he figured out where he was.  I think there was enough intent (the level of intoxication needed to negate intent is extreme).

But I do buy that the police were inclined to let this one go, because of the odd circumstances.

None of that means that the media/public/Trudeau reax was over the top BEFORE the prank aspect of this came out.  In hindsight it may look funny to some.  In real-time, it does not.

Unionist

Blaming Sophie Grégoire for not locking the door is pathetic and disgusting. It's an example of the kind of partisan screaming that goes on around here (on all sides) and which I tried unsuccessfully to ridicule [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/canadian-politics/justin-trudeaus-family-home-br... on[/url] and then [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/canadian-politics/justin-trudeaus-family-home-br......

But... who in god's name cares whether the intruder was very drunk, too drunk, criminal, not criminal... this is the pettiest sort of incident imaginable, except for its star celebrity context.

To me, the only question of interest - unanswered to date - is who made this story public (and, secondarily, why)?

 

Pondering

Sophie, on finding a note to lock her doors sitting on a pile of butcher knifes probably called the police while leaving the house with her three children. That's what I would be doing. 911 while running to get the kids out of the house with my heart pounding. The intruder could still have been in the house.

Were I the police and got a call from any home never mind the Trudeau home describing that situation would, I should hope, send multiple police cars and investigators immediately.

The question is not how the story got out, it's how they could possibly have kept it any quieter. There are reporters who follow police.

Aristotleded24

Pondering wrote:
Were I the police and got a call from any home never mind the Trudeau home describing that situation would, I should hope, send multiple police cars and investigators immediately.

Absolutely. Someone breaking into a house while the residents are home is a very potentially volatile situation. Whether the intruder becomes desparate and frightened, or the homeowner decides to take the law into his or her own hands, the potential for violence in that situation is quite high.

Debater

Unionist wrote:

To me, the only question of interest - unanswered to date - is who made this story public (and, secondarily, why)?

I already proposed an answer to this question several days ago.  I don't see how it's different than any other poltiical story in Ottawa or what it is you're trying to figure out.

The police were probably contacted by Sophie Grégoire, neighbours in Rockcliffe Park began talking, etc., the press (based right on their doorstep in Ottawa) got wind of it and reported it.  Same as any other incident involving a politician in Ottawa.  How did news of Brazeau's domestic violence controversy first make news?  Probably the same way.  The press have sources in the police who tell them when there's a story involving a politician, and it goes on air not long after.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Sophie could not have phoned 911 when the intruder was on the premises because her and the kids were asleep. She did not confront a knife wielding robber however when she awoke she discovered evidence of an intruder and that would have been very disturbing. 

Speculating about the intent or motive of the intruder is a fruitless exercise given the lack of facts about the intruder, at least in the public realm.

Quote:

Trudeau was not in the house at the time, but his wife, Sophie Gregoire, and three small children were sleeping inside.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/08/26/suspected_intruder_entered...

NorthReport

Probably for the same reason this thread was started.

Unionist wrote:

Blaming Sophie Grégoire for not locking the door is pathetic and disgusting. It's an example of the kind of partisan screaming that goes on around here (on all sides) and which I tried unsuccessfully to ridicule [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/canadian-politics/justin-trudeaus-family-home-br... on[/url] and then [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/canadian-politics/justin-trudeaus-family-home-br......

But... who in god's name cares whether the intruder was very drunk, too drunk, criminal, not criminal... this is the pettiest sort of incident imaginable, except for its star celebrity context.

To me, the only question of interest - unanswered to date - is who made this story public (and, secondarily, why)?

 

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Sophie could not have phoned 911 when the intruder was on the premises because her and the kids were asleep. She did not confront a knife wielding robber however when she awoke she discovered evidence of an intruder and that would have been very disturbing. 

Speculating about the intent or motive of the intruder is a fruitless exercise given the lack of facts about the intruder, at least in the public realm.

Quote:

Trudeau was not in the house at the time, but his wife, Sophie Gregoire, and three small children were sleeping inside.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/08/26/suspected_intruder_entered...

Did you expect her to wait until she found a note saying "shouda checked the closets, ha ha"? Or did you expect her to check the house herself to make sure the intruder(s) weren't lurking in the basement? 

Everyone on the board is partisan to some extent but this is extreme partisanship. If I were a man alone in a large house and found a note like that on top of butcher knives I would get out while calling 911 to tell them some sicko might still be in my house.

I would expect protocall would have the police entering with guns drawn to check the house before allowing the family back in.

The neighbours would have noticed the police swarming around as it was morning so people would be going to work. The early information we heard was just that a threatening note had been found. Nothing about knives. It could not have been more low key. Trudeau's only statement after it leaked was that it was disturbing and that Sophie and the kids were joining him in Montreal. If he had said 'no comment' partisans would be asking what he was hiding.

The Trudeaus and the Liberals handled this appropriately right down to leaving the matter of charges up to the police. They did not demand security they only requested an assessment. The press wrote about it because it was what everyone wanted to read about and talk about. The news got out because it was impossible to keep it a secret. Not saying anything would have been even more sensationalized as people speculated on the reason for police and for Sophie and the kids joining Trudeau. You might as well complain that the sun goes down at night.

 

pookie

It's also touching to observe people's faith that, had a crime been committed the police would one hundred percent have laid charges, and that they didn't is obviously proof of the opposite. 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering nothing I said was an attack on either Sophie or you. Please don't bring your personal vendetta to this thread as well.

All I said is the family awoke after the intruder left and the intrusion and note would have been disturbing. As for who phoned 911 AFTER the intruder left I have no idea, it could have been Sophie or it could have been the nanny.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Pondering nothing I said was an attack on either Sophie or you. Please don't bring your personal vendetta to this thread as well.

All I said is the family awoke after the intruder left and the intrusion and note would have been disturbing. As for who phoned 911 AFTER the intruder left I have no idea, it could have been Sophie or it could have been the nanny.

Then I apologize. I misunderstood you to be inferring that because she didn't confront the intruder there was no need to call 911.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Apology accepted. 

Please try not to read inferences into my posts it leads to miscommunication.  If you haven't noticed I make points very directly.

Since there was no imminent threat if this had been a regular citizen and not a prominent politician the police would not have arrived in a hurry but as a routine follow up call. Maybe the regular cops passed it over to the RCMP given it was a party leader and no ongoing crime.

It was an unfortunate and unsettling incident but only newsworthy because of the victim not the intruder or his actions.

Debater

NorthReport wrote:

Probably for the same reason this thread was started.

The thread was started because it was a major national political story that day.  It was on all the major news broadcasts.

I didn't expect this thread to become 5 pages so quickly, though.

knownothing knownothing's picture

Debater wrote:

NorthReport wrote:

Probably for the same reason this thread was started.

The thread was started because it was a major national political story that day.  It was on all the major news broadcasts.

I didn't expect this thread to become 5 pages so quickly, though.

Did you start a thread when JT balanced the baby on his hand? I believe that was a national news story as well.

Pages