Medical cannabis users face increased prescription costs if Bill C-74 passes

33 posts / 0 new
Last post
NorthReport
Medical cannabis users face increased prescription costs if Bill C-74 passes
voice of the damned

To be honest, I kinda thought medical cannabis would go entirely by the wayside with legalization.

Then again, I am someone who always thought that buying medical cannabis was sort of the equivalent of buying Dr. McGillagool's Stamina Tonic from the back of a covered wagon during Prohibition.

SpectateSwamp SpectateSwamp's picture

When growing Pot is Legal: Everything Changes

Like Everything...

Business Wifi sites that prohibit marijuana posts and links. Will be gone

You may fail a Pee test if you don't have traces of pot.

Anti-PotHeads won't be allowed to preach their lies in public without being challenged.

No longer will PotHeads fear the Pee Test or the Whiff Test

Having a Anti-PotHead catch the scent of weed is just as serious.

All those gutless Educators, Academics, Scientists and other Intelligentsia that sat idly by when these outright lies were spewed; must repent.

Anti-PotHeads hate PotHeads and we hate them even more.. Karma is coming for 'em all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nHTYT3hoFQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKxzpPj4Jwc

 

When Canada goes legal: July First... PotHeads like me will join the parade. Puff Puff. We won...

voice of the damned

First off, legalization is not currently scheduled for July 1st. That came from an unsourced leak, and both Bill Blair and Trudeau have said it's not the date.  

Anti-PotHeads won't be allowed to preach their lies in public without being challenged.

I don't think anyone is preventing them from being challenged now, as a quick glance through any copy of High Times Magazine can probably confirm.

 

 

Pondering

voice of the damned wrote:

To be honest, I kinda thought medical cannabis would go entirely by the wayside with legalization.

Then again, I am someone who always thought that buying medical cannabis was sort of the equivalent of buying Dr. McGillagool's Stamina Tonic from the back of a covered wagon during Prohibition.

That's because you fell for the anti-pot propaganda. There is evidence of reduced use of opioids in cancer patients. Cannabis definitely treats movement disorders, not only severe epilepsy in children for which Charlotte's Web was developed, and for sufferers for whom no other medication worked. Literally doomed children severely developmentally delayed because too much of their time is spent having seizures.   In a petrie dish, there are cannabinoids that kill several forms of cancer. There have also been some small animal studies. There is also evidence that it treats depression, more specifically PTSD. 

While Cannabis is habit-forming for some it is not physically addictive like nicotine, alcohol and opioids. 

Medical research has been hamstrung by laws. It's extremely difficult to get all the permissions, and do human studies and even then there is the funding issue. Pharmaceutical companies haven't been particularly interested because it will be difficult to patent effectively. Cannabis has been used medically for thousands of years. 

The laws being devised by various provinces are silly and not based on science nor the public good. They are political calculations rooted in ignorance. I'm not particularly upset because they don't matter. As soon as cannabis is legal they will lose control. They are looking at similarities between cannabis, tobacco, and alcohol but not the differences in production and outcome. 

The number one benefit by far of being the first G20 countries to legalize will be Canada getting a jump on the medical research industries. Our universities will make the break-throughs. We will leave Israel and the US in the dust. 

The draconian laws won't work because of the nature of cannabis. Politicians may even know it. Maybe they have chosen to go with the church ladies as a political calculation. Once it is legal the truth will out. It is even of benefit that some provinces are stricter than others. It will be a natural control study of sorts. 

Unfortunately it is a huge missed opportunity to continue to demonize cannabis. In the local pot industry "organized crime" is small farmer family businesses and small retail businesses. Local businesses that benefit the local economy and feed a lot of families and individuals. This regime attempts to put all those people out of business. It will not be easy for those people to be absorbed into the economy. Where will they find work? Not at the corporate farms. Not in the government retail outlets. They will not give up their livelihood without a fight even though the laws against them are being made more draconian. Their existing distribution network is already illegal. That hasn't stopped it. Stricter laws won't either. 

It would have been far better to give these people, including Compassion Clubs, a route to the legal system rather than trying to wipe them out. They would have been better off creating laws concerning home grows than trying to forbid them. They could have required the use of grow tents, air filters, dehumidifiers, and led lights. Something that really would make growing safer and protects buildings from damage. 

No vape lounges means illegal cannabis clubs (blind pigs). It's too big an opportunity. There will be party houses and condos. Word of mouth. Tourists will come and they will require a place to consume.  If we don't want it consumed in inappropriate places like open air festivals and parks and side streets we have to provide an alternative. 

Inevitably on a commercial level cannabis will go the way of alcohol only on a much faster pace and with "craft breweries" on the forefront. On the medicinal front it will soon prove its value as a major boon to physical and mental health. Once grandma is using it for her arthritis and to boost her appetite it is going to be much more difficult to demonize it. 

This is a shame because there are some valid concerns about using it too young or too heavily or smoking rather than vaping. There are some valid concerns over edibles and the production of oil. The overwrought nature of concerns overshadows the valid ones. 

SpectateSwamp SpectateSwamp's picture

voice of the damned wrote:

First off, legalization is not currently scheduled for July 1st. That came from an unsourced leak, and both Bill Blair and Trudeau have said it's not the date.  

Anti-PotHeads won't be allowed to preach their lies in public without being challenged.

I don't think anyone is preventing them from being challenged now, as a quick glance through any copy of High Times Magazine can probably confirm.

 

 

High times fooie. 

Obviously you don't toke. 

We have to sneak around and be down wind or be ratted out to the police or bosses. 

Only the rich and retired can now start to counter stupid Anti-PotHeads  without repercussions 

I have been doing it for years and haven't noticed many other PotHeads for good reason. 

We don't care about 01 July date... That is OUR date and the govt be dammed 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwFvH4Za_B4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3QHDCKKFcU

voice of the damned

That's because you fell for the anti-pot propaganda.

Believe me, I am not one who places any stock in anti-pot propaganda. Seriously.

Possibly, just my lack of interest in the general subject of medical marijuana deters me from reading about all the genuine medical discoveries that have been made about it. Or maybe there's been some sort of media blackout on it's cancer-curing properties and whatnot.

In fairness to myself, the medical marijuana industry is often its own worst enemy, in terms of discrediting itself...

https://tinyurl.com/y9gsy84y

The name of the place is basically advertising that the medicine they're selling will get you stoned.

 

 

 

voice of the damned

Spectate wrote:

We have to sneak around and be down wind or be ratted out to the police or bosses. 

I'm not saying it's easy to toke(in fact, I think the Canadian media is quite likely exaggerating how easy it currently is in the buildup to legalization), I'm saying it's easy to counter the "lies preached by anti-potheads."

 

 

voice of the damned

Spectate wrote:

We don't care about 01 July date... That is OUR date and the govt be dammed

Well, you DID write...

When Canada goes legal: July First... PotHeads like me will join the parade. Puff Puff. We won...

So, I assumed you thought pot would be literally legal on July 1st, not just that it will be a special day for potheads(for some unknown reason).

Helpful bit of advice for any pot smokers who misread the news: Come July 1st, DON'T assume pot has been legalized unless you get confirmation on that. The cops would love nothing more than for a bunch of misinformed potheads to light up in front of the police station, thus setting themselves up for an arrest.  

 

 

 

Pondering

voice of the damned wrote:

We have to sneak around and be down wind or be ratted out to the police or bosses. 

I'm not saying it's easy to toke(in fact, I think the Canadian media is quite likely exaggerating how easy it currently is the buildup to legalization), I'm saying it's easy to counter the "lies preached by anti-potheads."

No it isn't. Unless someone knows someone who uses cannabis, and even then, they don't know who or what to believe. For example, In one of the states that legalized, the number of accidents in which cannabis use is considered a factor is up. But is that because of increased testing or incidence? There is also evidence that alcohol related accidents are down and over all accidents are down. That suggests that maybe some alcohol users are switching to cannabis and having fewer accidents as a result. There has been notable decreases in opioid use. There has been wildly successful treatment of movement disorders. 

This information should be widely known. It is not easy to counter the lies of anti-cannabis zealots but it is about to get much easier. 

Pondering

voice of the damned wrote:
 Helpful bit of advice for any pot smokers who misread the news: Come July 1st, DON'T assume pot has been legalized unless you get confirmation on that. The cops would love nothing more than for a bunch of misinformed potheads to light up in front of the police station, thus setting themselves up for an arrest.  

The paperwork is a hassle. Going to court is a hassle. It isn't worth the time. Once it is legal arrests will rise as it will be a ticketable offence. 

voice of the damned

Pondering wrote:

This information should be widely known. It is not easy to counter the lies of anti-cannabis zealots but it is about to get much easier. 

How will legalization make the information more widely known that it is now?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
In a news release, NDP finance critic Peter Julian urged Minister of Finance Bill Morneau to zero-rate medical cannabis tax in line with all other prescription medicine and to exempt it from any additional taxes based on the fact that one-in-five Canadians already can't afford their critical medicine.

It's currently a "prescription medicine" because it's illegal to sell otherwise.  But once anyone can walk into a retail outlet and buy it without a prescription then it won't really be like, say, insulin, so much as like Tylenol.

Quote:
To be honest, I kinda thought medical cannabis would go entirely by the wayside with legalization.

Well, not the usage of it.  But doctors having to specifically authorize someone to use it?  I can't see why they'd bother.  Doctors don't write prescriptions for other "over the counter" medications.

voice of the damned

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
To be honest, I kinda thought medical cannabis would go entirely by the wayside with legalization.

Well, not the usage of it.  But doctors having to specifically authorize someone to use it?  I can't see why they'd bother.  Doctors don't write prescriptions for other "over the counter" medications.

Yeah, that's basically what I meant, the regulation and sale of it as a prescription drug.

Though I'm tempted to say that even the whole concept of "medical marijuana" will disappear. Yeah sure, it has some medicinal properties for some people. So does does alcohol. But we don't talk about medical whiskey as a cure for anxiety, because anyone who wants to use it that way can buy it as easily as for any other reason.  

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Yeah sure, it has some medicinal properties for some people. So does does alcohol. But we don't talk about medical whiskey as a cure for anxiety, because anyone who wants to use it that way can buy it as easily as for any other reason.

I get what you're saying.  But as someone who's been prescribed Medical Prunes for my constipation, let us not rule out the wonders of Mother Earth's Prescription Medicines. 

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Realated yet not related (I see the contradiction,no sense on calling me out for it) In news about impending recreational legalization.

This is one of the biggest canards I have read in a while about cannabis.

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/construction-industry-worried-about-workers-...

So let me guess,workers wouldn't dare smoke at work unless it's legal. Yeah,OK.

Here's 2 things why it's not even plausible.

1) It is not conducive to labourous jobs. It makes your day drag on twice as long.

2) If a legal or illegal substance were to be used at the job,it would more than likely be something that gives you energy. Like blow or speed.

More idiocy. And what does this mean for workers using it medicinally? I'm not sure what APCHQ's motivation is here. It's a blatant red herring.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
So let me guess,workers wouldn't dare smoke at work unless it's legal. Yeah,OK.

Feel free to tell me if I got you wrong, Alan, but it seems like you're suggesting that workers who want to roll one aren't actually waiting for legalization?

Quote:
Here's 2 things why it's not even plausible.

1) It is not conducive to labourous jobs. It makes your day drag on twice as long.

2) If a legal or illegal substance were to be used at the job,it would more than likely be something that gives you energy. Like blow or speed.

And again, tell me if I've got the wrong end of the stick but are you now saying they wouldn't, because it makes you more lethargic?

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
So let me guess,workers wouldn't dare smoke at work unless it's legal. Yeah,OK.

Feel free to tell me if I got you wrong, Alan, but it seems like you're suggesting that workers who want to roll one aren't actually waiting for legalization?

Quote:
Here's 2 things why it's not even plausible.

1) It is not conducive to labourous jobs. It makes your day drag on twice as long.

2) If a legal or illegal substance were to be used at the job,it would more than likely be something that gives you energy. Like blow or speed.

And again, tell me if I've got the wrong end of the stick but are you now saying they wouldn't, because it makes you more lethargic?

Sort of,yes. But my main point is this notion that only when legal workers will start smoking it at work. There's never been anything stopping anyone from doing this since like,forever. Many years ago I worked at a restaurant and me and one of the chef's smoked a spliff in the garbage room. It was a bad idea. My day dragged on forever. I never did it again.

And btw,there was other drug use going on there. But it was substances that gave one energy. No one wants their day to drag on,I don't care where you work.

Lastly,I don't understand FTQ's motivation either. Especially when they spew the 'what message does this send to kids' argument.Why would this be of importance to the union? I sense a political axe to grind.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
But my main point is this notion that only when legal workers will start smoking it at work. There's never been anything stopping anyone from doing this since like,forever.

Well, other than the law.

FWIW, though, I do agree that smoking a spliff on the job just means making your job a huge bummer, and wasting that spliff.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

FWIW, though, I do agree that smoking a spliff on the job just means making your job a huge bummer, and wasting that spliff.

Ricky disagrees.

Rev Pesky

From voice of the damned:

we don't talk about medical whiskey as a cure for anxiety

There is a country and western song in there somewhere, I'm sure of it.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
But my main point is this notion that only when legal workers will start smoking it at work. There's never been anything stopping anyone from doing this since like,forever.

Well, other than the law.

FWIW, though, I do agree that smoking a spliff on the job just means making your job a huge bummer, and wasting that spliff.

Well,I don't think you can factor in the law. Cannabis prohibition is a law nobody obeys as care free to anything beside jay walking. So the law means nothing. I think this is why legalization is happening everywhere now. It's a failed law and everyone has resigned to that fact.

This garbage being flown everywhere since legalization has become a reality is laughable. All the people moaning about people driving high as if peopel will only start doing it once it's legal and that when it was illegal nobody did it. I remember dropping acid and eating a handful of shrooms and my buddy had a car and we decided to go to some bar. It was a disaster. I do not recommend it. People have been driving high for decades. The suggestion that it will be a new phenomenum makes me want to tear my hair out. As for working high,this has been going on for decades. I remember a story in Montréal where a city employee was clearing snow with a tractor and was found with a few fortys of beer in the cabin by police. He didn't lose his job by the way. This is nothing new. Legal,illegal it's going to happen for a FEW people. The law means shit.

But I'm glad we sort of agree that it's not a good idea to work high. It's not that it's a 'bummer' or a 'waste of a spliff' it makes your job more difficult and it lengthens your day.

I suppose cocaine can be effective if you work sales. I've worked sales and my project manager was notoriously a cokehead. He had to talk all day. I suppose it actually enhanced his job performance. But that's a subject for another thread.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

I don't know if this is true, but I heard the sugar plantation owners in the Carribbean used to give their slaves mass quantities of cannabis to help them get through the day. After you break through the lethargy, it can actually give you energy.

As far as making the clock tick faster or slower, I think it is a function of age more than stonedness. If you were 5 years old and someone told you to wait 5 minutes, each one of those 300 seconds would drag on like an eternity. When you are 60, you blink and those 5 minutes are gone. Generally, if you don't want the clock to tick, it will, and if you want the clock to tick, it won't.

As a PTSD sufferer, I have to be careful of any psychoactive substance, as they can cause psychosis for me. However low quantities of cannabis in food products do fill me with a general sense of well-being without causing me to perigrenate around the planet Jupiter. 

The other concern is the smoke. There is a lot of tar in it, and it can accumulate in the lungs, reducing lung capacity, and worsening various forms of COPD. 

So I am awaiting mild edible versions quite eagerly. For anyone else, whatever floats your boat!

Pondering

voice of the damned wrote:

Pondering wrote:

This information should be widely known. It is not easy to counter the lies of anti-cannabis zealots but it is about to get much easier. 

How will legalization make the information more widely known that it is now?

Because there will be no increase in traffic accidents and may even be a decrease. It will be pretty difficult to call it the devil's weed when nothing bad happens as a result of legalization. People won't have to hide their use. Doctors, lawyers and other professionals use weed. Other people will then see that cigarettes and alcohol are much much worse and wonder what the hell the hoopla was about. Aside from that medical research in Canada will explode as we will be the first G20 country to legalize. As the benefits become more broadly known it will simply be impossible to maintain the lies.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

As the Democratic People's Republic of Korea also has legal cannabis, it is hoped that a Canada-DPRK-Colorado cannabis cartel can be formed for the economic benefit of our three nations. Anything we can do to bring the DPRK into the wider world will be better for all of us, and a giant step toward world peace.

Pondering

voice of the damned wrote:

Though I'm tempted to say that even the whole concept of "medical marijuana" will disappear. Yeah sure, it has some medicinal properties for some people. So does does alcohol. But we don't talk about medical whiskey as a cure for anxiety, because anyone who wants to use it that way can buy it as easily as for any other reason.  

Alcohol was used medically for a very long time. Better remedies have been developed. That is not yet possible with Cannabis. While there are different types of alcohol they all have the same impact. That is not true of cannabis. Someone who lacks experience won't know which strain to choose, assuming there are a couple of hundred strains available which I doubt. 

Depression, anxiety, pain, insomnia would all be treated differently. Aside from that different people react differently to the same strains. There is also the issue of dosage. 

Charlottes web is used to treat children with seizure disorders for which not other medication works. For them it truly is a miracle. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XHEoUeAD7s

Charlotte's Web medical cannabis soon to be widely available to Colorado children

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqvJOAV7oAc

At the age of 10, Deryn Blackwell was diagnosed with leukaemia and two years later developed a rare form of cancer called Langerhans cell sarcoma. After four unsuccessful bone marrow transplants he was given just days to live, but somehow Deryn battled his way back from the brink and has since made a full recovery. Deryn’s mother Callie revealed that she had been giving him medicinal cannabis and credits it with saving Deryn's life. Broadcast on 27/03/2017

http://www.greenstate.com/health/explainer-does-marijuana-cure-cancer/Sc... Shows Cannabis Has Anti-Cancer Properties

Still other scientists are more hopeful about cannabis’ potential efficacy, and point to laboratory and animal studies that show cannabinoids like CBD and THC kill cancer cells in laboratory conditions — without harming the healthy cells nearby. While clinical trials on human subjects is still a ways off — given cannabis’ status as a controlled substance – the preclinical data gives reason to hope that patients stories of success aren’t just flukes.

“There is a large body of scientific data which indicates that cannabinoids specifically inhibit cancer cell growth and promote cancer cell death” explains Dr. David Meiri, the lead researcher on an Israeli project studying 50 varieties of cannabis and its effects on 200 different cancer cells. Meiri and his team have successfully killed brain and breast cancer cells through exposure to cannabis and they are hopeful they can find more varieties of cancer cells that respond to this treatment.

I am hopeful that cannabis will become the new penicillin in terms of being a drug that can alleviate a multitude of untreatable illnesses or those for whom the treatment is devasting. 

Now due to legalization here human clinical trials can be done. It will still go slow because there isn't any money in it for pharmaceutical companies.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

A cure for cancer! Reminds me of William Rockefeller, father of John D!

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Now due to legalization here human clinical trials can be done. It will still go slow because there isn't any money in it for pharmaceutical companies.

True, I guess, if it turns out that any old "dank bud" is the cure for everything.  If it can be distilled, synthesized, extracted or concentrated then there could be money to be made.  And don't rule out "Big Cannabis" funding their own research.  They're not Big Pharma yet, by a long shot, but they're not poor either, and they know what side their bread is buttered on.

cco

Michael Moriarity wrote:

Mr. Magoo wrote:

FWIW, though, I do agree that smoking a spliff on the job just means making your job a huge bummer, and wasting that spliff.

Ricky disagrees.

Well, naturally. He's not a pessimist; he's an optometrist.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

+1

Pondering

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Now due to legalization here human clinical trials can be done. It will still go slow because there isn't any money in it for pharmaceutical companies.

True, I guess, if it turns out that any old "dank bud" is the cure for everything.  If it can be distilled, synthesized, extracted or concentrated then there could be money to be made.  And don't rule out "Big Cannabis" funding their own research.  They're not Big Pharma yet, by a long shot, but they're not poor either, and they know what side their bread is buttered on.

No far from everything but the trials done so far have been very promising for several cancers and it definitely works for a particularly difficult form of epilepsy. There are many cannabinoids. It isn't people sitting around smoking joints getting cured. Particular cannabinoids have to be directly on the cancer cells. There is very serious research going on but it has been very limited because it is an illegal substance. In my opinion the medical potential it has far outweights the significance of recreational marijuana being used. 

This conversation began because it was said as soon as it is legal it will not longer be treated as a medicine. That it is no different than alcohol. Cannabis is very different from Alcohol. It does factually have medicinal qualities. I don't see why that is so difficult to believe. When used medicinally strain matters. They differ greatly in effect by strain and method of ingestion. 

But go ahead, scoff, time will tell. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
This conversation began because it was said as soon as it is legal it will not longer be treated as a medicine. That it is no different than alcohol. Cannabis is very different from Alcohol. It does factually have medicinal qualities. I don't see why that is so difficult to believe. When used medicinally strain matters. They differ greatly in effect by strain and method of ingestion.

As I understand it, the idea is that it will no longer be treated as a "prescription" medicine.

This would imply that it could be taxed, like other freely available medicines like Tylenol, and that it would not be covered by "drug plans", like other freely available medicines like Tylenol.

I didn't pick up the part where nobody would be interested in the therapeutic benefits of it.  But if anyone can buy it, for any reason they wish, there's not much reason to consider it a prescription remedy.

Will it turn out to be good for insomnia, or anxiety, the way Vitamin C is good for a cold, or echinacea is good for the flu?  Probably!

Pondering

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
This conversation began because it was said as soon as it is legal it will not longer be treated as a medicine. That it is no different than alcohol. Cannabis is very different from Alcohol. It does factually have medicinal qualities. I don't see why that is so difficult to believe. When used medicinally strain matters. They differ greatly in effect by strain and method of ingestion.

As I understand it, the idea is that it will no longer be treated as a "prescription" medicine.

This would imply that it could be taxed, like other freely available medicines like Tylenol, and that it would not be covered by "drug plans", like other freely available medicines like Tylenol.

I didn't pick up the part where nobody would be interested in the therapeutic benefits of it.  But if anyone can buy it, for any reason they wish, there's not much reason to consider it a prescription remedy.

Will it turn out to be good for insomnia, or anxiety, the way Vitamin C is good for a cold, or echinacea is good for the flu?  Probably!

No, the argument was made that it is no more medicinal than alcohol. 

Tylanol is one drug. There aren't hundreds of forms of Tylanol. What is good for PTSD is not necessarily right for opioid withdrawal or substitution, or for appetite and nausea. 

People don't want to get high when they are using it medicinally. They just want relief of symptoms. Oil and edibles already exist but they need to be refined. Testing and development has been severely hampered. 

Discovery of the Cannabinoid Receptor System

In 1988, Allyn Howlett and William Devane used radioimmunoassay techniques to characterize the existence of a cannabinoid receptor in a rat brain. (13) In 1990, Miles Herkenham and his team mapped the locations of a cannabinoid receptor system in several mammalian species, including man. (14)

Receptors are most dense in the basal ganglia, hippocampus, and cerebellum, and are sparse in the lower brainstem areas controlling heart and lung functions.

"High densities of receptors in the forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement." (15)

https://www.drugscience.org/Petition/C3D.html


The illegality of cannabis has made it extremely difficult to do research. Exceptions are difficult to get and supplies are limited and it's difficult to get grant money. Anyone who has any significant experience with cannabis knows that different strains have a different impact on them yet the only aspect measured is THC. It's the cannabinoids that make one strain different from another. It is canabinoids in Charlotte's Web that has made such a miraculous difference for children with untreatable epilepsy. Yet it was developed by illegal growers using the most primative methods of cross breeding. Charlotte's Web is not a big moneymaker. It's not a popular strain. It's development was altruistic. I believe it's ingested as an oil. To me it is criminal that a compound proven to dramatically reduce seizures has recieved so little research and development. Opening up research into cannabinoids has enormous potential.