Mulcair to meet Marois Friday

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Brachina
Mulcair to meet Marois Friday

Tom and Marois to meet, this should be interesting. Tom seems open to an exchange of ideas on how best to serve Quebec, but draws that line at seperatist disruption, understandable. So how do you think Marois will conduct herself, will she be advesrial or reach out an olive branch in response to Mulcair's olive branch. Any chance an end to the Bloc could be negiotated? Paille serves at Marios' leasure. What else might they negiatate? What do you think the out come will be. http://m.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/mulcair-to-push-pqs-issues-in...

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Brachina wrote:
Tom seems open to an exchange of ideas on how best to serve Quebec, but draws that line at seperatist disruption, understandable.

What a bunch of horse manure. Quebecers will decide if sovereignty is in our best interests, not Tom Mulcair. If Mulcair really wants to serve the interests of Quebec, let him listen to all sides openly and transparently. Mulcair knows full well where Marois stands. If he rejects out of hand her stance even before he meets with her, what's the point of a meeting at all?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Oh, Mulcair's meeting with MAROIS.  For a second there, I thought you meant he was going to talk to THESE guys:

 

 

 

socialdemocrati...

Because there's more to Quebec politics than the national question.

Unionist

1. The right of all employees in airlines, railways, shipping, trucking, broadcast companies, banks - all federally-regulated enterprises - to work in French. Should be a no-brainer, given that Mulcair himself tabled it:

Quote:
"The idea would be simply to provide in the federally regulated work force in Quebec the same language rights that exist in the provincially regulated work force," said the NDP's Quebec lieutenant, Thomas Mulcair, who tabled C-455 in 2009.

It's not fully what the PQ wants (which is Bill 101, namely, that the language of work must be French), but it would be a huge step forward, especially for those private-sector companies which were never crown corporations and to which even the Official Languages Act doesn't apply. Examples: CP Rail, the banks, etc.

2. Devolving management of EI to Québec. This would merely expand on the existing agreement whereby Québec controls its own maternity leave, paternity leave, parental leave... and charges higher premiums and delivers superior benefits to the rest of Canada. I have no idea what the NDP's position on that is, but "asymmetrical federalism" would seem to dictate an open mind on an issue which really has little country-wide inherent scope.

3. The environment. Should be a no-brainer also, as the programs look similar to me. The issue is how to combat Harper's offensive. Mulcair and Marois should join efforts in that regard.

4. Likewise with Dutch Disease, free trade, the death of manufacturing.

I think there's lots to talk and agree about. I haven't attempted an exhaustive list. The key in my view is that Mulcair remain faithful to the Sherbrooke Declaration (I heard him and the other leadership candidates wax very eloquent on the subject during their Montréal encounters), and that Marois be prepared to really join forces in fighting Harper.

But then again, neither one of them asked me.

Stockholm

Boom Boom wrote:

Brachina wrote:
Tom seems open to an exchange of ideas on how best to serve Quebec, but draws that line at seperatist disruption, understandable.

What a bunch of horse manure. Quebecers will decide if sovereignty is in our best interests, not Tom Mulcair. If Mulcair really wants to serve the interests of Quebec, let him listen to all sides openly and transparently. Mulcair knows full well where Marois stands. If he rejects out of hand her stance even before he meets with her, what's the point of a meeting at all?

Tom Mulcair is a Quebecer just as much as Marois and he has just as much right to weigh in on the "national question" as she does. He is the leader of an unswervingly federalist party - the NDP. So its a given that he will not meet Marois to say "I support your pish for Quebec independence"

lagatta

I think it is obvious they will not discuss NDP support for Québec independence. There are many other planks of their programmes that are similar and it is important to fight Harperization.

Brachina

Stockholm wrote:

Boom Boom wrote:

Brachina wrote:
Tom seems open to an exchange of ideas on how best to serve Quebec, but draws that line at seperatist disruption, understandable.

What a bunch of horse manure. Quebecers will decide if sovereignty is in our best interests, not Tom Mulcair. If Mulcair really wants to serve the interests of Quebec, let him listen to all sides openly and transparently. Mulcair knows full well where Marois stands. If he rejects out of hand her stance even before he meets with her, what's the point of a meeting at all?

Tom Mulcair is a Quebecer just as much as Marois and he has just as much right to weigh in on the "national question" as she does. He is the leader of an unswervingly federalist party - the NDP. So its a given that he will not meet Marois to say "I support your pish for Quebec independence"

Bingo.

Anyway they could also talk about the up coming free trade agreement with Europe, piping Alberta Oil to Quebec for refining (something already in the works), Plan Nord (or at least how it impacts on those areas of federal juristriction), and so on.

Unionist

Ken Burch wrote:

Oh, Mulcair's meeting with MAROIS.  For a second there, I thought you meant he was going to talk to THESE guys:

 

 

 

I asked the mods to correct the spelling, thus ruining your joke. Sorry, Ken!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist wrote:

1. The right of all employees in airlines, railways, shipping, trucking, broadcast companies, banks - all federally-regulated enterprises - to work in French. Should be a no-brainer, given that Mulcair himself tabled it:

Quote:
"The idea would be simply to provide in the federally regulated work force in Quebec the same language rights that exist in the provincially regulated work force," said the NDP's Quebec lieutenant, Thomas Mulcair, who tabled C-455 in 2009.

It's not fully what the PQ wants (which is Bill 101, namely, that the language of work must be French), but it would be a huge step forward, especially for those private-sector companies which were never crown corporations and to which even the Official Languages Act doesn't apply. Examples: CP Rail, the banks, etc.

In Quebec that makes sense but not in various other provinces.  Any change like this would need to be carefully drafted otherwise a French speaker in BC would be guaranteed the right to work in French when no one else in the workplace even speaks the language.  While it is important in Vancouver that a French speaker from another part of Canada can access government services in their Official language it would be absurd to think that a bank employee would have the right to work in French when it is a language that less than 1% of the population list as their mother tongue. Being a French speaking teller who only works in French would be a very, very lonely job out here.

In your nation you can do what you want with language but it is clear that this is primarily a Quebec issue and Mulcair will have to expend political capital to bring it to fruition.  I wish he was as brave about other issues that are life and death matters.

Bärlüer

kropotkin1951 wrote:

In Quebec that makes sense but not in various other provinces.

May your fears be assuaged (excerpt from the NDP bill mentioned above):

Quote:
8.1 (1) Federal works, undertakings or businesses carrying on their activities in the Province of Quebec are subject to the following requirements:

(Emphasis added.)

Unionist

Thanks, Bärlüer.

Kropotkin1951, I thought I made it clear that this is not only already official NDP policy, but it's the subject of a Mulcair bill facing the House. This isn't something Marois will need to lobby Mulcair for. Just remind him.

In any event, I hope everyone finds it strange that some large companies in Québec - CP Rail, for example - where probably 80-90% of workers are francophone, are under no legal requirement to communicate with their employees in French at all. At an FTQ conference, a delegate from one of the CPR unions said that paper pay slips had been abolished, and employees were now required to get them through the company intranet - using an English-only system. That couldn't happen at (say) CN or VIA or Air Canada, all of which are governed (for a variety of reasons) by the Official Languages Act. That's an example of an anomaly which must be corrected.

 

 

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Unionist wrote:
Ken Burch wrote:

Oh, Mulcair's meeting with MAROIS.  For a second there, I thought you meant he was going to talk to THESE guys:

 

 

 

I asked the mods to correct the spelling, thus ruining your joke. Sorry, Ken!

Ah well...it had a good run.  Maybe the premier will make up for it by dressing as Princess Peach(Princesse Peche?)...or Mulcair will do that, which would actually make the "photo opportunity" afterwards far more interesting.

Brachina

The pink dress would clash with his oragne tie :p