The NDP Resurgence in Quebec - Canto the Second

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The NDP Resurgence in Quebec - Canto the Second
Caissa

Purgatorio, oldgoat?

oldgoat

I'm not really anticipating Paradiso.

 

Stockholm

According the ARG poll out today - NDP support in Quebec is 18%!

 

ottawaobserver

Where's Debater when you need him, eh!

NorthReport

It's good to see confirmation of the growing support for the NPD in Quebec, which will result in 3-10 seats for the NPD in Quebec in the next federal election.

 

Quebec

 

Party / 00 GE / 04 GE  / 06 GE / 08 GE / *

NPD / 01.8% / 04.6% / 07.5% / 12.2% / 18%

* Angus Reid Strategies Federal Poll - released today, Aug 12, 2010

NorthReport

Interesting article by Alice Funke that appeared in the Globe today, August 12, 2010  

 

Expanding the Debate on Party Financing

A look at all four sources of revenue shows the Bloc Québécois is less dependent on public subsidies than many of its critics charge

 

http://www.punditsguide.ca/2010/08/expanding-the-debate-on-party-financing/

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/expanding-the-debate-on-party-financing/article1670270/

 

 

Debater

Since only Leger and CROP are trusted pollsters for Quebec numbers, the Angus Reid numbers for Quebec are not reliable.

ottawaobserver

Debater wrote:

Since only Leger and CROP are trusted pollsters for Quebec numbers, the Angus Reid numbers for Quebec are not reliable.

OK, great.  Now we have you on the record on that. :-)

ReeferMadness

stockholm wrote:

This has got to be the most bizarre argument I've heard in a very long time. You decry growing homelessness. growing poverty etc.... and then you condemn the NDP for caring about "the economy" because it is short hand for economic growth. So does that mean that you think that the way to alleviate poverty and homelessness is to SHRINK the economy?? Are saying the NDP should arrange a national tour whereby they say "Vote NDP so we can make the economy SHRINK and that way yours and everyone elses standard of living will decline"!? I think that any party running on a platform of dismissing economic concerns and wanting to encourage negative economic growth would end up as a pariah along the lines of the Flat Earth Society. If the goal is to have as small an economy as possible then i guess that means that the economic role model for canada should be whatever country as the lowerst per capita GDP in the world? I guess Reefer Madness will be catching the next flight to Luanda to leans all about what Angola did to make itself the poorest country on earth and what lessons Canada can learn from the Angolans!

I think that we are exceeding the planet's capacity to regenerate and if we continue to use more and more resources, there will be an ecological collapse, inevitably accompanied by an economic collapse, probably accompanied by a world war, quite possibly nuclear in nature.  After that happens, maybe we could reconvene and discuss how important it is to have a growing economy.

I think that between grotesque financial inequality, planned obsolescence, poorly manufactured goods, trendy fashions, and intrinsically pointless business activities, our economies are so wasteful, we could easily cut the economy in half (in wealthy countries, certainly) and still maintain reasonable standards of living for all.  Probably we could cut much more if we focused on efficiency.  And we could all spend a lot less time at work.

I think there is no significant political party (at least not in Canada) that has the vision or the guts to confront these problems honestly.  The party that comes closest is the Work Less Party in BC.

And I think that Angola has one of the highest gini coefficients in the world.  The oil wealth is being funnelled away by a corrupt government.

And I think you're defending the status quo. And so, fundamentally, is the NDP.

Nowhere did I say the goal should be to have the smallest economy possible; but I would say that a reasonable measure of societal efficiency would be to divide the level of happiness over the GDP.

 

NorthReport

So if we were to analyse which of the say, nine other seats, in La Belle Province which could go NPD in the next federal election, apart from Mulcair's Outremont seat,  which ones would they be, and in which order?

I Outremont, QC

2 Would Gatineau, QC be second ?

3  Or would Hull-Aylmer, QC be second ?

4 How about Westmount-Ville Marie?

5 And Lac St Louis?

6 Jeanne-Le-Ber?

7 Rosemont-La Petite Patrie?

8 Drummond?

9 Pontiac?

10 NDG-Lachine?

11 Chateauguay-St Constant?

12

 

 

Debater

ottawaobserver wrote:

Debater wrote:

Since only Leger and CROP are trusted pollsters for Quebec numbers, the Angus Reid numbers for Quebec are not reliable.

OK, great.  Now we have you on the record on that. :-)

I assume you got the joke on that one.  Wink  Because I was informed on the previous thread that only Leger and CROP are accurate pollsters for Quebec, that means that the Angus Reid poll that shows the NDP at 18% can't be considered reliable.  Wink

NorthReport

This latest Angus Reid Poll must be very, very discouraging for the Liberals in Quebec - does anyone else see the trend!

Party / 00 GE / 04 GE / 06 GE / 08 GE/ Angus Reid Poll - today, Aug 12, 2010

Libs / 44.2% / 33.9% / 20.8% / 23.8% / 20% / Down 3.8% from the last election under Dion

Where's Bob Rae when you need him?

 

 

Debater

NorthReport wrote:

So if we were to analyse which of the say, nine other seats, in La Belle Province which could go NPD in the next federal election, apart from Mulcair's Outremont seat,  which ones would they be, and in which order?

I Outremont, QC

2 Would Gatineau, QC be second ?

3  Or would Hull-Aylmer, QC be second ?

4 How about Westmount-Ville Marie?

5 And Lac St Louis?

6 Jeanne-Le-Ber?

7 Rosemont-La Petite Patrie?

8 Drummond?

9 Pontiac?

10 NDG-Lachine?

11 Chateauguay-St Constant?

12

I wish there was a 'rolling eyes' icon.

ottawaobserver

We will win Gatineau in the next election, I'm now convinced.  As to other seats, it depends who might run, but as we've seen before, strong candidate recruitment can be a game-changer.  If Pierre Ducasse runs again in Hull-Aylmer, I also believe he would be in very strong contention, having run in last fall's municipal election, and managing to lose that race with a greater percent of the vote than Marcel Proulx obtained when he won federally last time.  In Montreal, the next target would be Jeanne-Le Ber with Daniel Breton, but W-VM if Anne Lagacé-Downson runs again could be in play if the Quebec Liberals continue their internal battles, and Ignatieff does not significantly improve his standing in that province.  Many of the other seats are out of reach, but some will see significant increases in NDP support next time around, I believe.

Debater

ottawaobserver wrote:

We will win Gatineau in the next election, I'm now convinced.  As to other seats, it depends who might run, but as we've seen before, strong candidate recruitment can be a game-changer.  If Pierre Ducasse runs again in Hull-Aylmer, I also believe he would be in very strong contention, having run in last fall's municipal election, and managing to lose that race with a greater percent of the vote than Marcel Proulx obtained when he won federally last time.  In Montreal, the next target would be Jeanne-Le Ber with Daniel Breton, but W-VM if Anne Lagacé-Downson runs again could be in play if the Quebec Liberals continue their internal battles, and Ignatieff does not significantly improve his standing in that province.  Many of the other seats are out of reach, but some will see significant increases in NDP support next time around, I believe.

I don't think Ducasse would be in very strong contention.  He finished in 3rd place in 2008.  Meanwhile, Marcel Proulx increased his margin of victory from 2006 and finished 15 points ahead of the 2nd place BQ.

It's also important to remember that Hull-Aylmer has been Liberal for 100 years and that is likely to continue for awhile longer.

I'm not sure what it is about this riding that makes the NDP want to target it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canadavotes/riding/057/

KenS

Because it is only a matter of time before it is not Liberal. And when that happens, its very easy to see how the NDP just leapfrog over the BQ.

NorthReport
bekayne

NorthReport wrote:

5 And Lac St Louis?

Instead of just looking at NDP vote, it's useful to look at the combined NDP-BQ vote. In which case Lac St Louis falls from 8th to 72nd.

 

edmundoconnor

NorthReport wrote:

Harper's agenda stokes Duceppe's fire

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/847485--hebert-harper-s-agend...

It's interesting Duceppe saying he's not interested in retirement. The leadership's his for life, but when he goes, I can't help but see the party drift rightward.

Sean in Ottawa

edmundoconnor wrote:

NorthReport wrote:

Harper's agenda stokes Duceppe's fire

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/847485--hebert-harper-s-agend...

It's interesting Duceppe saying he's not interested in retirement. The leadership's his for life, but when he goes, I can't help but see the party drift rightward.

That's one possibility-- implosion is another. Since Duceppe has been there he has been joined by a number of others on the left of that party. while the BQ is a nationalist party with a program practically speaking most of its actual work falls outside of that and a dramatic shift could not occur without the loss of a large number of MPs who are not as captive as people might think -- they can simply move to other jurisdictions-- cities or provincial government. Would the party survive the exodus? Maybe not but the party likely would not survive an abrupt ideological change either without tearing itself apart.

Many have spoken about how the BQ is in favour of PR but would lose by such a system. In fact that may not be true. If the BQ split in to two nationalist parties one left of centre and the other right, PR could make both viable.

Debater

KenS wrote:
Because it is only a matter of time before it is not Liberal.

Really?  That's news to me.  I suppose your comment taken to its literal conclusion is correct (eg. one day in 20 years it might vote differently), but that could apply to many of the ridings in Canada.

For the immediate future it will remain Liberal.

I'm also puzzled to see Jeanne Le Ber on the NDP list as the NDP only received 15% of the vote there in 2008.  It's basically a BQ/Liberal riding.  I also would have thought it was apparent that Westmount-Ville Marie is off the radar since the Liberals won there by a 2 to 1 margin in 2008.  It was fun prior to the 2008 election to speculate about a possible changing of the guard there, but I think the election results of 2008 made it pretty clear that Westmount is not another Outremont.  Quebec political expert Antonia Maioni explained that at the time. 

KenS

If you would stop at saying 'probably' will remain Liberal, you wouldnt get argument.

The point is whats in contention in Quebec and what the NDP targets.

Most of the seats held by the NDP in Ontario the NDP vote share was in the low teens for ten years or more. After Jack Layton became Leader the building process began, and the NDP was in contention in all of them. More of them it took 2 or 3 elections to win, but some were won from the NDPs vote share having been WAY back in the previous election.

Its the same situation in Quebec now.

And you seem to have backslid into waving around "experts"- that agree with you of course.

I'd agree that Westmount is probably more out of reach than most of the NDP targeted seats now, but thats because of the added effect of Garneau now the incumbent. Not because some "expert" said it was always out of reach.

KenS

If the Liberals dont turn around in general, Hull-Aylmer is exactly the kind of riding they will lose sooner rather than later.

You ASSUME the Liberals will get back to at least more or less to where they were.

[And Hull-Aylmer is the kind of seat they could lose even if they do make a modest general recovery.]

ottawaobserver

I was arguing for Hull-Aylmer both on the strength of Ducasse (and weakness of Marcel Proulx), and because the BQ's new policy of eliminating federal jobs and transferring them to the province (courtesy of Daniel Paillé) will see many PSAC members who live on that side of the river switch to the NDP.  Also, I predict a spillover from Boivin's near-win last time for the NDP in Gatineau.

She is running a helluva pre-election campaign, by the way, and Layton has been in the riding all week doing his french immersion, and then events in the community every day with her.

Meantime, the Liberals have issued this unbelievably arrogant release on the occasion of the Bloc's 20th anniversary (courtesy the Postmedia/Canwest political blog).  I guess we can relax, because it wasn't only the NDP's fault that Harper was elected.  Apparently when they talk to Quebeckers, Liberals think it was the Bloc's fault, and so the Bloc's obligation is to basically disband and vote Liberal.  Good luck with that.

Quote:

Bloc parties in Montreal, Liberals fume

Bloc Québécois Leader Gilles Duceppe will be partying this week in Montreal to mark the 20th anniversary of his first election victory that launched a new political dynamic that continues to this day.

The Bloquistes will have an outdoor gathering, complete with a corn roast, music and entertainment, late on Saturday afternoon at Montreal's Parc La Fontaine, followed by a commemmorative gala on Sunday morning at Place des Arts.

Meantime, the federal Liberals were hoping to bring some rain on the Bloc parade by firing off their own attack against the Bloc.

------ 

For immediate distribution
August 13, 2010 

Taking stock of 20 years of the Bloc Québécois: a party that has lost its raison d'être and thwarts Quebec's progress

OTTAWA - On the 20th anniversary of the election of the first Bloc Québécois member to the House of Commons, Quebeckers are wondering whether the Bloc has become a counter-productive force in the defence of Quebec's interests, according to members of the Quebec caucus of the Liberal Party of Canada.

As Marc Garneau, Quebec Lieutenant for Michael Ignatieff, said: "The Bloc has served its time. At one point, the Bloc's constant opposition was really neither productive nor counter-productive. But now, with its strong representation in Parliament--which allowed for Stephen Harper's election--the Bloc is clearly having a counter-productive impact on the defence of Quebec's interests.

"The Bloc says that it wants to represent Quebeckers' priorities. Right now, the top priority of Quebeckers is to get rid of Stephen Harper and to elect a progressive federal government in which they can recognize themselves. In other words, the Bloc is preventing Quebeckers from achieving their top priority. The Bloc has lost its reason for being," added Mr. Garneau.

Marcel Proulx, the Liberal Member for Hull-Aylmer and Liberal Party Deputy Whip, also believes that the Bloc has become counter-productive in representing Quebeckers' values in Ottawa.

"We have to choose the values that will define this country for the next generation, and the Bloc, by allowing the election of a Conservative government, has relegated its constituents' values to the opposition. It has thrown open the gates for the retrograde values of a party representing a minority of Canadians to take over our federal government.

"In fact, what is the Bloc's legacy on this 20th anniversary of the election of its first Member? Their achievements are minimal. And since the Reform Party swallowed up the former Progressive Conservative Party, the Bloc literally prevents progressive values from returning to power and thus thwarts Quebec's progress."

I would have thought it was the Liberals' behaviour in Québec that was keeping Quebeckers from voting Liberal, not the Bloc's (who said "sponsorship").  But no, it's the Bloc's fault.  Boy these guys are brazen in their sense of entitlement.

genstrike

Has anyone found it curious that the main personalities in this NDP "resurgence" are former Liberal elected politicians (Mulcair, Boivin)?

Krago

Congratulations to Gilles Duceppe on his 20th anniversary as a Canadian MP!

edmundoconnor

@ SiO: Maybe it's just my background, but I can see a lot of similarities between the BQ and the SNP – both parties are independence parties, each with their left and right wings who live in uneasy harmony with each other. In the SNP's case it was the union of the Scottish Party and the National Party of Scotland who each had their own distinct vision of Scotland (home rule in the Empire v complete independence) and it's been the devil's own job to keep them from each other's throats and hurl them at the enemy.

Also both parties are led by a charismatic leader who is a skilled and adroit debater and who leans to the left (in Duceppe's case, a lot more), but when they go, it is a good question whether the parties are something more than being merely held together by a leader's will.

edmundoconnor

Krago wrote:

Congratulations to Gilles Duceppe on his 20th anniversary as a Canadian MP!

Felicitations, indeed. How long before he becomes the father of the House?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Then again...did he WANT to spend 20 years being a Canadian MP?

ottawaobserver

genstrike wrote:

Has anyone found it curious that the main personalities in this NDP "resurgence" are former Liberal elected politicians (Mulcair, Boivin)?

It's a quirk of Quebec, I think, genstrike.  Both had very progressive credentials outside of elected politics and neither would run for a separatist party.  Pauline Jewett was a former Liberal elected politician, and she was very progressive -- one of the finest members of our caucus in the 1980s as far as I'm concerned -- and was a real role model for me.

adma

ottawaobserver wrote:
I was arguing for Hull-Aylmer both on the strength of Ducasse (and weakness of Marcel Proulx), and because the BQ's new policy of eliminating federal jobs and transferring them to the province (courtesy of Daniel Paillé) will see many PSAC members who live on that side of the river switch to the NDP.  Also, I predict a spillover from Boivin's near-win last time for the NDP in Gatineau.

And don't forget, too, the spillover from Paul Dewar across the Ottawa River.

That said, Marcel Proulx's continued incumbency remains a token impediment--though if Hull-Aylmer were to become an open seat, who knows...

Stockholm

Are you suggesting that there is any personal vote whatsoever for Marcel Proulx?? He has gt to be one of the weakest and most unattractive of all Liberal MPs. The guy looks like a reptile and looks like almost a parody of greasy Tammany Hall style Duplessis cabinet minister from the 1950s. I suspect that the Liberals win Hull-Aylmer DESPITE having him as their candidate - not because of it.

A picture is worth a thousand words:

Debater

ottawaobserver wrote:

I was arguing for Hull-Aylmer both on the strength of Ducasse (and weakness of Marcel Proulx), and because the BQ's new policy of eliminating federal jobs and transferring them to the province (courtesy of Daniel Paillé) will see many PSAC members who live on that side of the river switch to the NDP.  Also, I predict a spillover from Boivin's near-win last time for the NDP in Gatineau.

I don't see anything particularly arrogant in the Liberal press release.  Most of the federalist parties usually point out that the BQ is preventing Quebecers from having representation in cabinet and that it has indeed moved away from its original raison d'etre.  Some of Quebec's political analysts have pointed this out - the BQ is not really a pro-independence party the way it first was.  It was supposed to be a temporary party that was working for the independence of Quebec - now it has become a permanent part of the Canadian Parliament.  Not sure why you think it's arrogant to point that out.

As for Hull-Aylmer, I don't think there will be much "spillover" effect from Gatineau or Ottawa Centre.  (It wasn't evident in 2008 anyway).  Many of the public servants who live in the riding are Liberal because they dislike the Conservatives.

I'm also still curious as to what makes Marcel Proulx "weak".  He is an undefeated MP and managed to win by a larger margin in 2008 than he did in 2006.  There doesn't seem to be any evidence of him being weak other than his opponents wanting to call him that.  I'm not saying he's going to be Prime Minister one day or anything, but he's not the political weakling he's been made out to be, either.

NorthReport

One of the best ways for voters to judge incumbents is to actually check what their track record is like.

What's Proulx's voting record?

 

NorthReport

Oh, oh, looks like there could be problems for the Liberals in Hull-Alymer, as we can actually track this rascal's voting record.

 

 

http://howdtheyvote.ca/member-divisions.php?id=238&s=13

Debater

Stockholm wrote:

Are you suggesting that there is any personal vote whatsoever for Marcel Proulx?? He has gt to be one of the weakest and most unattractive of all Liberal MPs. The guy looks like a reptile and looks like almost a parody of greasy Tammany Hall style Duplessis cabinet minister from the 1950s. I suspect that the Liberals win Hull-Aylmer DESPITE having him as their candidate - not because of it.

A picture is worth a thousand words:

So now you are using ad-hominem attacks to make your argument that Proulx is a weak MP?  You're calling him names and insulting his physical appearance?  Surprised

It's out of line, Stockholm - you are better than that.

But, on the other hand, you have just helped strengthen the argument I was making above and shown why the NDP won't in this riding.

ottawaobserver

Could you summarize that for us, NR?  It's a bit long.

Debater, my assessment of Proulx as weak has been based on watching him in the Commons.  I can't remember the last original issue he's championed, or any substantive contribution to the debate on anything.  He's almost never given a question in QP either.  Stockholm perhaps shouldn't have inferred his political style from his looks, but he still called the political style correctly.

Perhaps you can point out any of his significant accomplishments as a Parliamentarian that I may have missed.  But from my perspective, it's a pretty thin record.

NorthReport

Let's do a liitte digging here, and see how many times this sucker voted to support Harper and his right wing policies.

Voting History for the 40th Parliament 3rd Session:

http://howdtheyvote.ca/member.php?id=238

Debater

ottawaobserver wrote:

Could you summarize that for us, NR?  It's a bit long.

Debater, my assessment of Proulx as weak has been based on watching him in the Commons.  I can't remember the last original issue he's championed, or any substantive contribution to the debate on anything.  He's almost never given a question in QP either.  Stockholm perhaps shouldn't have inferred his political style from his looks, but he still called the political style correctly.

Perhaps you can point out any of his significant accomplishments as a Parliamentarian that I may have missed.  But from my perspective, it's a pretty thin record.

1.  I don't think there's anything for NR to summarize, per se.  It's just a list of every single thing Proulx has ever voted on.  The same records exist for all the MP's.

2.  Now I see where you are coming from about Proulx.  You were talking about his Commons performance.  I was talking about his electoral record in the riding.  I said above that I don't think Proulx is the strongest Parliamentarian or someone who is likely to become PM.  I was pointing out that he knows how to win Hull-Aylmer and that his track record there is pretty good and that he went up in 2008.  As for questions in the Commons, if you are interested, Proulx asks quite a few questions during QP.  He was in several heated exchanges with the Cons earlier this year.  And when the Liberals were in power, he was the Chairman of the Committee that passed same-sex marriage.  He did a good job managing it I thought considering he had several anti-gay Cons to deal with such as hypocritical adulterer Vic Toewes.

3.  And yes, Stockholm shouldn't call him a reptile.  Hopefully he will realize his error on that one.  Particularly since Proulx is a progressive MP on social issues and helped pass gay marriage.  If we have to call someone a reptile I would prefer it be aimed at someone like former Liberal MP Pat O'Brien.

Stockholm

Actually Proulx has another big claim to fame. He was Ignatieff political chief for Quebec for about 9 months, then he got fired after he took the lead in running the federal Liberal party right into the ground in that province.

Debater

Stockholm wrote:

Actually Proulx has another big claim to fame. He was Ignatieff political chief for Quebec for about 9 months, then he got fired after he took the lead in running the federal Liberal party right into the ground in that province.

He was Dion's Quebec Lieutenant, not Ignatieff's.  Stockholm, I realize you don't like him, but you've got to get your facts straight.  (And perhaps acknowledge that calling him a reptile is out of line?)

And the problems in Quebec can hardly all be laid at the feet of Proulx - they were largely created by Dion.

Stockholm

I would go out on a limb and say that IF the Quebec results of the ARG poll as well as recent polls by Leger and CROP were in fact the result in the next election and the NDP vote in Quebec actually did jump from 12% to 18% - the party would probably win two or three seats in addition to Outemont and Gatineau. I can't see which seats those would be - a lot would depend on local factors and the recruitment of strong candidates etc...in 1963 the NDP had no candidate in Beauce, in 1965 the candidate was the legendary Robert Cliche and he won over 7,000 votes (just 3,000 behind the winning Creditiste MP), then in 1968 he ran in another riding and the new NDP candidate in Beauce got 400 votes. There were rumours a while ago that Romeo Saganash of the Cree Grand National Council was going to run in Abitibi-James Baie-Eeyou - if that had happened - that riding would have immediately become a top NDP priority and couuld have been winnable - but it was 100% dependent on getting a candidate with a strong personal vote.

adma

Whatever Proulx's deficiencies, incumbency matters, sad to say--that is, unless he himself was dragged down by deeper, more obvious personal scandal than simply "lookng slimy".  Otherwise, it would really have taken an across-the-board cratering of Liberal support to take him down; as it was, Stephane Dion merely tresded water at worst in Quebec, and perhaps repatriated some of that "soft left" vote that might have been flirting with the Layton/Mulcair NDP.  So, for *that* particular election, the deck wound up stacked against Ducasse, anyway...

Stockholm

The whole premise of what Wright is saying is ABSURD. No changes to the electoral map will come into effect until AFTER the next election. Also, each party has certain seats it is targeting in Quebec and each party gets federal funding based on its raw vote total across the country - so writing off a whole province makes no sense. Parties already make strategic decisions to pour or not pour resources into individual ridings.

NorthReport

This confirms that the NDP is growing in Quebec. 

Let's just realize who Taber is quoting here - Wright is the Ipsos Reid pollster who often shows the Harper Conservatives with more support than the other pollsters, and the NDP often with less support than the other pollsters.

This is the kind of tactic we see when the big boys don't get their way. Get their way means a majority government of course.

I suppose Wright's idea of democracy is a party with 30% or so support, deserves to have a majority government.

I thought the Bloc were elected democratically, so I find the whole premise disturbing, but by all means let's have the Libs and the Cons vacate Quebec.

 

 

Should Tories, Liberals and New Democrats just give up on Quebec?

 

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-notebook/should-tories-liberals-and-new-democrats-give-up-on-quebec/article1674396/

ottawaobserver

In any event, Debater, your incremental approach to prediction ignores the impact of transformative election campaigns.  In other words, it would not have predicted any of the seats the Bloc originally won in 1993, nor any of those won by the Conservatives in 2006.  And I doubt, if the NDP ever achieves its hoped-for breakthrough in Quebec, that it will predict that either.

Instead, you have to look at demographics, and try to infer prospects from other indicators.  Notice that no-one is talking about Chambly now, even though we held it in the past.  That's because, without Phil Edmunston, people believe it's not an obvious target, unlike say Jeanne-Le Ber might be.  However, Edmunston's case shows how the right candidate with the right issue (an environmentalist and consumer advocate candidate at the time of the tire fire in Ste-Basile Le Grand), along with a strong local campaign, can make all the difference.

ottawaobserver

Hey, but she gets to fill column inches and generate clickthroughs for the Globe online.

NorthReport

Taber's column was one of the worst I have read on Canadian politics in a long time.

 

 

On bad advice

 

But from a less party-oriented standpoint, I'd think there's reason for real concern that so much of the Canadian political class seems to be eager to override the will of Quebec voters: the most oft-repeated attack on per-vote party financing has been an argument that we should be actively trying to tilt our political system against the party which regularly dominates federal elections in the province, and now seat redistribution is being pitched explicitly as a means of ensuring that the province doesn't have any real say in governing Canada. Which figures to do plenty of damage to the relationship between Quebec and the rest of the country - but may also offer a significant opportunity for anybody willing to stand up for the idea that maybe it's worth listening to both.  

 

http://accidentaldeliberations.blogspot.com/2010/08/on-bad-advice.html

bekayne

NorthReport wrote:

Taber's column was one of the worst I have read on Canadian politics in a long time.

 

That's a phrase that could get recycled over & over again

ottawaobserver

Yes, in fact making it into a keyboard macro could cut the diagnosis of repetitive strain injury in half in the Canadian blogosphere, I imagine.

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