Separating the federal and provincial NDPS

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scott16
Separating the federal and provincial NDPS

I think that being the only federal party connected at the hip to the provincial parties is detrimental to the federal party's success.

Peter Stoffer mentioned this idea a couple weeks ago. I agree they never help only hurt the federal party.

agree or disagree?

Regions: 
robbie_dee

I'm reposting Sean in Ottawa's comment from another thread here because I think it deserves broader discussion.

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

The principle is really a bad one. The jurisdictions are different. It works both ways. In some cases people way want to join the provincial NDP and not the federal one and other they may be upset at an NDP provincial government and still want to be part of the federal NDP. Since the leadership is not connected and does not have a common set of postitions, how can the membership be connected. This policy is actually quite insulting to both federal and provincial members. The provincial AND the federal NDP both lose as each offers the other a reason why some of their supporters cannot participate, This weakens both.

The policy is based on a completely false concept of a single movement.

I agree with Sean. I would add that I think it is particularly unfair to allow for separate memberships in only one jurisdiction, Quebec, simply because the Party is trying to avoid getting pinned down on the national question, while joint membership remains required in all other jurisdictions despite what may be similarly compelling policy differences between the federal and provincial parties (e.g. the Federal and B.C. NDP's feud with the Alberta NDP over the extent to which the latter province may appropriately exploit its oil resources).

Speaking for myself I have been withholding any financial or other support from the federal NDP since last year because I simply could not accept the way in which the federal party has treated Erin Weir. I live in Ontario and would very much like to support my provincial party. I think Andrea Horwath and her team are doing critically important work in opposition to Doug Ford's government. But I feel I cannot renew my membership at this time because it would also involve at least implicitly supporting the federal party. I realize this is a much smaller and more personal point of difference than either Quebec sovereignty or the TMX pipeline but I think it speaks to Sean's broader point that there really isn't a good reason to compel common membership in both parties when a lot of people may have their own reasons to want to join one but not the other.

Sean in Ottawa

robbie_dee wrote:

I'm reposting Sean in Ottawa's comment from another thread here because I think it deserves broader discussion.

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

The principle is really a bad one. The jurisdictions are different. It works both ways. In some cases people way want to join the provincial NDP and not the federal one and other they may be upset at an NDP provincial government and still want to be part of the federal NDP. Since the leadership is not connected and does not have a common set of postitions, how can the membership be connected. This policy is actually quite insulting to both federal and provincial members. The provincial AND the federal NDP both lose as each offers the other a reason why some of their supporters cannot participate, This weakens both.

The policy is based on a completely false concept of a single movement.

I agree with Sean. I would add that I think it is particularly unfair to allow for separate memberships in only one jurisdiction, Quebec, simply because the Party is trying to avoid getting pinned down on the national question, while joint membership remains required in all other jurisdictions despite what may be similarly compelling policy differences between the federal and provincial parties (e.g. the Federal and B.C. NDP's feud with the Alberta NDP over the extent to which the latter province may appropriately exploit its oil resources).

Speaking for myself I have been withholding any financial or other support from the federal NDP since last year because I simply could not accept the way in which the federal party has treated Erin Weir. I live in Ontario and would very much like to support my provincial party. I think Andrea Horwath and her team are doing critically important work in opposition to Doug Ford's government. But I feel I cannot renew my membership at this time because it would also involve at least implicitly supporting the federal party. I realize this is a much smaller and more personal point of difference than either Quebec sovereignty or the TMX pipeline but I think it speaks to Sean's broader point that there really isn't a good reason to compel common membership in both parties when a lot of people may have their own reasons to want to join one but not the other.

I understand and agree with your entire point. I also think that this is against the interest of both the federal and provincial parties.

It is based on a false reality of a common movement where there either is not one or should not be one given that the leadership of the parties are not responsible to each other.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Definitely time for the joint membership requirement to go.  It serves no valid purpose any longer and costs the NDP a lot of memberships it could otherwise get at either the federal or provincial level.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

Definitely time for the joint membership requirement to go.  It serves no valid purpose any longer and costs the NDP a lot of memberships it could otherwise get at either the federal or provincial level.

The joint membership requirement serves the interest of party hacks who want to prevent the establishment of a rival party at either the federal level or in any of the provinces. The joint membership requirement makes it illegal for folks who are unwilling to give up their federal NDP membership, to give up their provincial membership to join a different political party, or vice versa.