Toews a Twitter, too.

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Caissa
Toews a Twitter, too.

Because I like alliteration.

Caissa

The parliamentary budget officer is estimating that changing the rules for conditional sentences could cost taxpayers an extra $145 million because of increased parole reviews and prosecutions resulting in trials.

Changing the eligibility rules for conditional sentences is one of the proposals in the government's omnibus crime bill, which is now in the hands of the Senate. A conditional sentence, sometimes called "house arrest," allows for offenders to serve their sentences in the community.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/02/28/pol-budget-officer-pris...

Debater

(I just posted this on the other thread in reference to a comment about Justin Trudeau:)

I agree.  His critics think he's just a drama queen, but he's very smart.  He's even figured out a way to get praise from BQ voters - something he didn't have before.  Wink

Btw, I haven't been able to check yet, but does anyone know if Papineau is the Conservatives' worst result in Canada?  They only got 4.87% of the vote there last year.  It must be close to their worst result in the entire country.

Hoodeet

Debater wrote:

 

Btw, I haven't been able to check yet, but does anyone know if Papineau is the Conservatives' worst result in Canada?  They only got 4.87% of the vote there last year.  It must be close to their worst result in the entire country.

 

Hoodeet (JW)

The NDP should be deploying every available resource to Papineau to find out what can be learned from them and applied with the necessary modifications in other ridings.

UWSofty

Debater wrote:

Btw, I haven't been able to check yet, but does anyone know if Papineau is the Conservatives' worst result in Canada?  They only got 4.87% of the vote there last year.  It must be close to their worst result in the entire country.

Third worst. Pundits Guide query

Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie and Laurier–Sainte-Marie were both lower

Debater

Thanks for the info.

Shows how hated the Conservatives are in Montreal.  No wonder they haven't won a seat there since 1988.

NorthReport

 

LIberals adrift on the SS Vikileaks

http://www.canada.com/news/Tandt+Liberals+adrift+Vikileaks/6224070/story...

It is extraordinary that, just as Bob Rae's Liberals were building up a tidy head of steam, smiting the Harper Conservatives in high moral dudgeon over robocalls and scavenging the lush wreckage of Bill C-30, they managed to drill themselves squarely in the kneecap with Vikileaks. Curly, Moe and Larry couldn't have done it better.

The upshot is a relief of political heat on the PMO, lessening likelihood of a judicial investigation into alleged electoral fraud, and perhaps a boost in support for the New Democrats. Thomas Mulcair, Brian Topp, Peggy Nash and the rest of the NDP leadership aspirants haven't been around for the big robocalls-showdown-Vikileaks reveal. But they have to be high-fiving each other — figuratively, in the privacy of their BlackBerrys — nevertheless.

The truth is that Liberal staffer Adam Carroll's (he is now technically a former Liberal staffer, having resigned Monday) astonishingly venomous, anonymous Twitter campaign against Public Safety Minister Vic Toews two weeks ago set a new low bar for personal poison in Canadian politics. His unmasking after an investigation by the Speaker has cost the Liberals their short-term advantage and significant credibility, Rae's unconditional apology to Toews notwithstanding.

Small wonder Rae left the Commons Monday looking deflated. He was back in the House early Tuesday, declaiming about the Charter and the flaws of the online privacy bill. But Toews easily trumped him by, first, demanding more answers from the Liberals on Vikileaks, and second, reiterating that the Liberals themselves have in the past supported legislation almost identical to C-30. The wind had been in the Liberals' sails: Now it's gone.

Let's consider first, just what Carroll — apparently using taxpayer-funded resources — did, and how. He set up an anonymous Twitter account, then began publishing salacious details of Toews' divorce proceedings, which are on the public record in Manitoba. Everyone on the Hill is plugged into Twitter: The gory details were passed around instantly. Liberal MP Justin Trudeau then took the campaign nuclear by tweeting the Vikileaks feed to his 115,414 followers.

It's important to note, in Trudeau's defence, that Twitter is a gloriously spontaneous but also inordinately nasty, filterless forum in which anything goes. Originally a venue where users could post pithy, 140-character vignettes about their current whereabouts or thoughts, the service has morphed far beyond that. It is embedded now in politics and journalism, making both more vital, and more brutal. There's no libel lawyer or grizzled copy editor guarding the feed to ensure fairness or good taste.

What's different about Vikileaks is the moral context. This dirty trick was done, not by some callow, bug-eyed lout in his basement, flipping back and forth between Gears of War and his Twitter account, but by a veteran political staffer. And, it was done at the very centre of the Liberal Party's political tactical unit, the party research bureau. It received wide media coverage. It's difficult to imagine how, at some point very early on, Rae did not sit down with his senior staff and say: Make sure we're not involved. If we are, make sure it stops, now. Why did that not happen?

Howard

I'm really bothered by how the media is reporting on Vikileaks as if it was some terrible thing. It wasn't. Everything released was public information. Publicizing it was an act of accountability for someone both deeply hypocritical and completely out of line in their discourse ("you're either with us or the pedophiles). The fact that media thinks it was bad makes me really worry about the excessively cozy relationship they have with our politicians. The media is basically going out of its way to pick up politicians dirty laundry and remove it from sight. What's more, when someone points to the naked emperor, the media is quick to scold them.

What's equally telling is the way the Conservatives have reacted to this scandal and others like it: by going on the attack. There is no accountability, no contrition, just attack, attack, attack.

The opposition parties are going to have to learn how not to yield under the bully tactics. Just because the Conservatives yell loudly doesn't mean they get to win an argument.

bekayne

Latest video from Anonymous. I'm starting to get confused. Just how many mistresses did Vic Toews have?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbfsN3ADvlk&feature=related

Debater

NorthReport wrote:

 

LIberals adrift on the SS Vikileaks

http://www.canada.com/news/Tandt+Liberals+adrift+Vikileaks/6224070/story...

It is extraordinary that, just as Bob Rae's Liberals were building up a tidy head of steam, smiting the Harper Conservatives in high moral dudgeon over robocalls and scavenging the lush wreckage of Bill C-30, they managed to drill themselves squarely in the kneecap with Vikileaks. Curly, Moe and Larry couldn't have done it better.

The upshot is a relief of political heat on the PMO, lessening likelihood of a judicial investigation into alleged electoral fraud, and perhaps a boost in support for the New Democrats. Thomas Mulcair, Brian Topp, Peggy Nash and the rest of the NDP leadership aspirants haven't been around for the big robocalls-showdown-Vikileaks reveal. But they have to be high-fiving each other — figuratively, in the privacy of their BlackBerrys — nevertheless.

The truth is that Liberal staffer Adam Carroll's (he is now technically a former Liberal staffer, having resigned Monday) astonishingly venomous, anonymous Twitter campaign against Public Safety Minister Vic Toews two weeks ago set a new low bar for personal poison in Canadian politics. His unmasking after an investigation by the Speaker has cost the Liberals their short-term advantage and significant credibility, Rae's unconditional apology to Toews notwithstanding.

Small wonder Rae left the Commons Monday looking deflated. He was back in the House early Tuesday, declaiming about the Charter and the flaws of the online privacy bill. But Toews easily trumped him by, first, demanding more answers from the Liberals on Vikileaks, and second, reiterating that the Liberals themselves have in the past supported legislation almost identical to C-30. The wind had been in the Liberals' sails: Now it's gone.

Let's consider first, just what Carroll — apparently using taxpayer-funded resources — did, and how. He set up an anonymous Twitter account, then began publishing salacious details of Toews' divorce proceedings, which are on the public record in Manitoba. Everyone on the Hill is plugged into Twitter: The gory details were passed around instantly. Liberal MP Justin Trudeau then took the campaign nuclear by tweeting the Vikileaks feed to his 115,414 followers.

It's important to note, in Trudeau's defence, that Twitter is a gloriously spontaneous but also inordinately nasty, filterless forum in which anything goes. Originally a venue where users could post pithy, 140-character vignettes about their current whereabouts or thoughts, the service has morphed far beyond that. It is embedded now in politics and journalism, making both more vital, and more brutal. There's no libel lawyer or grizzled copy editor guarding the feed to ensure fairness or good taste.

What's different about Vikileaks is the moral context. This dirty trick was done, not by some callow, bug-eyed lout in his basement, flipping back and forth between Gears of War and his Twitter account, but by a veteran political staffer. And, it was done at the very centre of the Liberal Party's political tactical unit, the party research bureau. It received wide media coverage. It's difficult to imagine how, at some point very early on, Rae did not sit down with his senior staff and say: Make sure we're not involved. If we are, make sure it stops, now. Why did that not happen?

The problem for the NDP is that they are vulnerable too - Harper has been going after them this week for making robocalls in anger to Lise St. Denis' office in Saint-Maurice after she crossed the floor.  Chantal Hébert mentioned this in her column this week as well.

janfromthebruce

everybody uses robocalls but not pretending to be another party. NDP were just letting the folks who elected an NDP politician just got burnt by her and she went with a 3rd place (or was that 4th place) party in the last election. We all know chantal hates the NDP and note that it didn't "stick" but why should it, it was legitimate. They weren't her constitutents because people voted for the NPD. If they wanted to be "liberal" they would have voted that way, instead it was 3rd place.

vaudree

Toews appointed "Catherine Everett", whom he had slept with to the judicerary before informing his wife that he got the babysitter pregnant. Thus, he cheated on his pregnant girlfriend of three years with someone that he later made a judge.

Anonymous argued that Harper switch Toews from Justice to the Treasury to prevent Everett's appointment from becoming a scandal. They also assume wrongly that the other MPs had no idea of this. Harper's strike is preemptive in that what the MPs would have asked for was Toews to step down as Minister  so if Toews steps down, story over.

Can't understand why even one woman would want to sleep with Toews - or maybe I can ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FdcGZVl9eA

Maybe 22 Minutes is right about Viagra being a bad idea!

 

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=http://www.lawyersweekly.ca/index.php?section=article&volume=31&number=4... file ruling ‘abusive’
Manitoba order to let Toews see who looked at file "unprecedented"[/url]

Quote:
An unprecedented ex parte ruling won by a senior federal Cabinet minister this month raises a far-reaching question: Should litigants be permitted to find out who has viewed their court documents?

The ruling, issued on March 7 by Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Richard Saull, required the court’s registrar to disclose to Public Safety Minister Vic Toews the list of people who viewed the politician’s divorce file over the past year.

The judge made the order on an expedited basis, without hearing from the people on the list, who were not notified of the proceeding. Toews’s counsel filed a motion for disclosure of the names on an urgent basis because he said his client wanted them in time for a House of Commons Ethics Sub-Committee meeting slated for March 8.

The names of two NDP researchers were subsequently identified as being on the list. No one appeared in court to oppose the motion, although the Manitoba Justice Department sent a lawyer with a “watching brief” who spoke briefly but did not take a position on the application....

“My reaction is that the legality of this order, in light of the open court principle is problematic,” said Nathalie Des Rosiers, general counsel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association....

Media lawyer Iain MacKinnon of Toronto’s Chitiz Pathak LLP described the court’s order as unprecedented.

“It is government and political power run amok,” he said. “It borders I think on being abusive...

“I’m generally in favour of openness as much as is possible, but this is not a principled basis of openness — ​this is to pursue political enemies,” he said.

The judge was appointed by the Harpocons in 2010.