What will it take to move the NDP from 20% to 25% in the polls?

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NorthReport
What will it take to move the NDP from 20% to 25% in the polls?

-_-

NorthReport

Now that the NDP has reached the psychological barrier of 20% in the polls, what will it take for Layton's crowd to pump up their polling to 25% before the next election? 

 

JACK LAYTON POSTS A POSITIVE MOMENTUM SCORE, AS HIS PARTY REACHES THE 20 PER CENT MARK FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE THE 2008 CAMPAIGN.

http://www.visioncritical.com/2010/03/tory-four-point-lead-continues-as-...

 

We have about another year before we head back to an election so there is a bit of time. The NDP if they so choose can make effective use of the time by organizing, by fund-raising and by developing a sound progressive and uncomplicated platform to run on.  

The NDP doesn't have to be all things to all people, just some things, for some of the people.

For example, some sound platform ideas include:

1 Developing more clarity around the NDP position, similiar to the Dutch government, which calls for Canada withdrawing our fighting troops from Afghanistan. The NDP's military position gets watered down by the mainstream press, so the NDP needs to refine its message to: "Troops out of Afghanistan". 

2 Never mind catering to the rich like Danny Williams who can afford to go outside the country for their medical services. Design a universal single payer health care system that includes a schedule to incorporate drugs, and then eventually dental needs that adequately looks after our average Canadians.  Be firm and remove all public money from any for profit medical process, and fund the public system through a progressive general tax structure.  

3 Fund all public education and skills training through a progressive general tax system, and remove all all public money and tax deductions from any private education programs and institutions. Our youth deserve a good future that education often brings. 

4 Set up a national housing strategy to create first homes for the homeless, and then move on to those on lower incomes.  

5 Set up national athletic, artistic, and scientific strategies to strive for Canadian excellence in these fields. 

6 Reorganize the Canadian pension plan so that it adequately provides for Canadians when they retire. Make all pension plans run by the government, so that they are portable, and are not affected by changing your job from one company bto another.

7 Revise Canadian's vacation structure so that it is government run, allowing for more vacation as one ages as opposed to one's role in an organization.       

TheEtobian

Polls are polls it's all about getting 25 + in a general election. That hinges upon getting out a good chuck of the none voting. At least in my opinion.

bonzo

Pretty ambitious agenda.  I think it would need to be much simpler than that.

 

Unfortunately, the TV would tell the masses that that sort of thing is impossible, that Stalin tried that, and if you like that sort of thing you should move to north korea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Canada is a conservative country, medicare and pensions to the contrary, and most probably see the NDP as a fringe element. Let's see if the NDP actually score 20% in the next election. Polls are one thing, elections are another. That said, movng the NDP to 25% in polling probably would take moving policy to the mainistream centre instead of the left, and in effect becoming more like the other parties.Frown

Stockholm

Right now, you can be sure that Liberal promises (whhc we know they will never keep) will be almost identical to NDP promises. The only difference is that the NDP wants to pay for its promises by cancelling the mammoth corporate tax cuts that are bieng brought in by the Tories with the Liberals yelling rah-rah-rah.

KenS

Two things.

** Moving significantly beyond the 20% glass ceiling is a breakthrough that does not happen in a year.

[Achieving either 25% at the ballot box, or a sustained 25% poll vicinity... could happen at any time from factors thatare not expected. But we're talking about deliberately breaking through to there... which means doing it regardless of environmental factors of the moment or other 'stars shifting' stuff.]

** And there is NO policy prescription, or set of them, that will get us there in themselves. Particular policy planks are part of the lomger term development of getting there. Probably the most important part, but still only a part.... not the key/trick themselves.

[Not to mention the associated point that ALL policy planks have pluses and minuses what they do to support levels. At a minimum, people have to disabuse themselves of the fantasy that some policy or group of policies is/are 'the ones' that will swing the door open. Thay ALL have pluses and minuses. In fact, making a breakthrough happens, part of the way you know you have arrived there, is that you can make policies work for you. Again, it isn't themselves policies that make things work. They are the reason d'etre, and the precondition for the breakthrough, but not the breakthrough.]

Sean in Ottawa

NorthReport wrote:

We have about another year before we head back to an election so there is a bit of time.

Perhaps it would be better if you prefaced such a statement with "I think"

I realize this is your opinion but it is not based on any facts. We have a minority government. We have a charged political atmosphere. We have opposition parties that hate the government. We have a governing party running consistently below its last election result in the polls. We have a popular assumption that they cannot govern if they go to the polls and lose seats because some other arrangement will be found. This does not add up to any reasonable assumption of time before the next election.

The only fact that somewhat supports your guess that there will not be an election this year is the fact that as of RIGHT NOW none of the parties seems to want an election and as of RIGHT NOW the population does not seem to want an election. Both of those facts are only relevant in the moment-- anything beyond today (literally as there is a budget tomorrow) is conjecture. I really hope that the NDP is preparing for an immediate election full tilt even if it hopes one can be avoided.

The path to the next election, I have long predicted is not going to be like the previous one. It is not going to be by some party or combination of parties wanting an election. I believe it is going to be by parties effectively painting themselves in to a corner out of which an election is the only exit. I do not believe the next election is going to be a wanted one. You can focus on the fact that the parties do nto agree-- what is behind that is that their supporters do not agree and each of the parties have to pay attention to their supporters. There are deal-breakers with respect to managing relations with the other parties-- things a Conservative cannot do to appease a New Democrat and things a New Democrat cannot do to appease a Conservative. There are political realities facing the Liberals -- the cost of rolling over for another year (you could argue that Ignatief's call for an election last year was not a bad strategy even as he got punished for it because it at least broke that up a bit and he at least can say to Canadians -- you did nto want an election -- you can't blame us for listening to you).

There is a present a governing crisis between the executive branch (PM and Cabinet) and Legislative Branch over the delivery of documents about the Afghan mission. At stake is the supremacy of parliament and potentially a huge scandal. It is difficult, if parliament moves to seize documents from the executive branch to argue that the government has confidence of the House. It is possible that regardless of the outcome, the issue could result in an election even if most parties or even all parties actually don't want one. I have stated I think the next election will be a conclusion that an election is the lessor of two evils even as it is not desirable. That said, the voters might even agree.

As well we are in a time when more information about the economy is coming out-- some good but also information about government spending. It is possible voters will find and conclude that this was as bad as the sponsorship scandal (if they do expect the opposition to immediately want an election once they have determined people are seeing it that way-- the only warning will be some rhetoric and polls indicating such a shift). There is little patience today for this government and possibly for the opposition. Any string of missteps will leave a party at a disadvantage and that alone can cause an election.

I think if the parties have their way, they would like to avoid an election this year-- but I am not convinced that it is better than a fifty-fifty chance that they can find enough face-saving, compromise and common ground to make it through the year with all the issues that will face them. They all know an election will come sooner or later and they will be judged on what they do this year and that is also a limiting factor. Right now, voters don't want an election but that can change. In the short term the parties are likely planning for the initial air-war over whose fault the election is.

Finally, while we speak of the blame for forcing an election -- unless someone goes out spoiling for a fight (like Ignatief did last Fall), I think that it may not even be a factor as the blame could be spread around based on party lines. If an election is forced over the documents, it is likely Conservatives will blame the opposition while the opposition blames them.

That is my detailed explanation as to why I hope you will show more restraint about declaring that there is no risk of an election this year. I don't want workers on the ground some of who are here to believe you. We can debate about the degree of risk but to deny that it is substantial is folly.

Sean in Ottawa

I do not assume the NDP is at 20% -- 20% is the top of a range of polls that shows the NDP between somewhere between 15% and 20%. I assume the NDP is actually very close to the last election which is about the average of the more credible polls including the 20% which does come from one of the more credible outfits.

To answer the question what would it take to get to 25% and the secondary question implied in some of the other replies how long.

First, I think when that jump happens it will be a quick one. Most significant poll changes are quick-- what looks like progressive slow change is often just margin of error fluctuations. Such a change could happen in a matter of weeks. Doesn't mean we know when or if it will happen but the jump itself will happen quickly. The work behind that, I could argue has already been done.

1) The NDP has a reasonable base of support in all regions (that took decades to build but it is there).

2) The NDP has a good base in Quebec and is well accepted there as an alternative (that has also taken decades).

3) Layton is seen positively by a large number of people and scores particularly well on key leadership traits (that has taken some years but is in place).

4) The federal NDP has established a long term credibility on the environment that while not uniformly assumed to be perfect is accepted as better than any of the other elected parties.

5) The voters currently distrust and dislike both the leader of the Liberals and the leader of the Conservatives.

6) The Liberals have a fairly right wing leader.

5-9% is not a big jump given the above and with all that foundation it could happen with little warning-- possibly not stopping around 25% but heading closer to a tie with the other two big parties carried by the momentum of the first 5% jump.

Where would that come-- well that might be easy too-- the NDP could run up in the polls in Quebec almost overnight. Indeed, Harper is not liked, the Liberals are not liked. If the BQ makes on gaffe or their leader retired the shake-up in that province could easily see the NDP on top of the polls there and that alone would drive them up the 5-9% nationally they need to reach 25%.

The French language press is not derisory of the NDP in the way the English language press is and seems quite open to the NDP.

I think if we are going to see that kind of jump this year-- watch for the wave to start in Quebec. If the NDP challenges the Liberals from the mid twenties then I think the Liberals could wilt and lose another 5% to them leaving the NDP at about 30% nationally.At that point it would be hard to imagine that half the Green vote would not follow suite just to make the change in government to a party that might make a difference. That would put the NDP somewhere around 33-34% and in a tie for first place. When it is time for this to happen -- don't expect a warning, I don't think there will be one.

I don't think a policy change is required for any of this to happen-- in fact I think that a third of Canadians would be quite comfortable with what the NDP offers.

(BTW I am not predicting that this will happen-- just saying that this is how it would look like if it did happen. I do think eventually it will happen but since I don't think there will be much if any warning, I don't see how we predict when. That the party has achieved all the prerequisites should give you what you need to know.) Perhaps, you can add to bring it home that the part also needs the good campaign, good platform and an accepted economic plan-- none of those are out of reach either and the finances are not bad either.

ottawaobserver

I suppose NR could pick the words used a little more carefully, but I thought the intent was reasonably well understood ... which was to instigate a discussion of the current context and next steps.

Actually, I particularly liked the insight of yours that it stimulated, which is that the next election will likely occur as an unwanted but necessary resolution to break the current impasse, once all other options rule themselves out.

For myself, I think the tide has turned on whether "people want an election" or not. I believe that people are now biding their time, and want to replace Harper ... not chomping at the bit to do it ... but they won't punish the party that provokes the election either, because they feel ready to render a decision again (I don't think they did last fall).

I don't have any evidence for this belief, but then I didn't have any for my belief last fall that folks weren't ready for an election either. Tellingly, the Conservatives who have the money for constant polling and opinion research have dropped their language about no expensive elections, so I'm reasonably sure that either means they want one, or (more likely) that they're finding people are less opposed now.

Buddy Kat

 

I think the NDP have to direct advertising and resources in a campaign to get people to vote. If you look at the demographics of who votes for who and look at their age and education you can pretty well deduce that the conservatives get their strongest support from greater than 65 year old people with below standard educations and that the Liberals and NDP do not get those votes but rather a fairly even low percentage spread. The NDP get support from the greater than 65 year old with a higher education which is a very small minority.

 

Instead of Jack pandering with ways to keep Harper in power by trying to help these so called  disadvantaged people and the unemployed, maybe he should keep in mind that those people he wants to help will sit there and collect a Canada pension that Tommy D and the ndp created and then turn around and vote for conservatives not even giving the ndp any credit whatsoever much less the time of the day. The same with a UI cheque. Mr and Mrs neocon are happily collecting what they call socialism cheques but do they vote for the socialist ? No but they love their money.

 

People don’t realize that the greater than 65 year old group that vote conservative are the segment of the population that is demented (demetia) senile , and suffering from alzhiemers more than any other group. They are also susceptible to white collar crime (conservatives) and are the number 1 group that is targeted by white collar criminals(conservatives). In election ridings conservatives will bend over backwards giving these people a ride to the voting booth and I’m sure they tell them where to place that “X”.

 

So I propose a campaign called stick it to the man …or better yet the old man! Explain these things to people …things like Medicare and old age security and unemployment insurance etc . are all ndp ideas and if you don’t support the NDP NOW they will disappear.  Get your head out of the bong and vote to target young people..forget about the greater than 65 yearolds they have been conned out of the picture . The name of the game now for the NDP is getting people to vote by exposing what the conservatives have done to manipulate them.

 

Maybe an ad showing some senile old people in the home that can’t even remember there name much less a government policy that affects you….with someone saying ..”Do you want them running your life “? Well guess what ? They do ..because you don’t vote and the conservatives have brainwashed them and make them vote for them …It’s time to “stick it to the man…the old man”….

 

An ad showing seniors getting their Tommy D. check and turning around voting for a tyrant might give a strong message also. I think the public would suck it up and really start paying attention to what the NDP stand for…I’ll bet most people haven’t even got a clue that if it weren’t for unions they wouldn’t even have a day off much less a vacation ..The country needs a good kick in the ass.

 

Well just my two bits made on polling observations…

NorthReport

You mean just like the way they tell Americans they live in a capitalist system, and that when their system runs into trouble, it would never be bailed out by the government with the people's money. Right.

NorthReport

 

The NDP absolutely need some exciting new policies to market to the voters such as ensuring pension portability, vacations based on age, education and training available to all, the best health care system on the planet, etc.  - programs that are going to make the masses rise up and say "Yea, I want that!"

Buddy Kat

I'm glad you mentioned Tommy Douglas.

We need to push for a Tommy Douglas National Holiday Day in Canada so that we can have a special day to celebrate all the wonderful programs the CCF/NDP has delivered on in the past. 

ottawaobserver

With your later post, Sean, you are arguing that the fundamentals are being put into place (and there's more to be done, to be sure, but a LOT of progress has been made) ... now we wait for "events, dear boy, events"; and see how to respond to those, prpare for them, and maybe even unleash a few "events" ourselves.

This is why I've been watching the situation with Bouchard's comments and the "lucides" in Quebec: to see what kind of opening may be presented there.

I did find it interesting the kind of leadership attributes that Angus Reid, I think it was, was asking about this time: works well with others, listens to others' opinions, etc., etc. I'm wondering why those were being asked about specifically now, when they haven't been before (in favour of more leader-as-strongman type attributes), and whether Reid had already picked up on an increasing salience of those qualities in perceptions of leadership. Clearly Layton is scoring particularly well on those dimensions, and if the election-as-impasse-breaker thesis of yours comes to pass, they will be even more important.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

NorthReport wrote:
We need to push for a Tommy Douglas National Holiday Day in Canada so that we can have a special day to celebrate all the wonderful programs the CCF/NDP has delivered on in the past. 

I love that idea. I wonder how much traction/support there is nation-wide for such a holiday?

Caissa

To answer the question in the title: the secession of Alberta.

Noah_Scape

What will it take to get the NDP up to 25%?

   Jack Layton has to be seen more, and he has to get a few simple clear points across.

  I would suggest more press conferances, or "media availability" sessions as Iffy called it yesterday when he got his face on TV. The CBC is still showing clips from that session on today's news. Notice that Iffy rambled on and on for minutes at a time on each question - not good.

  I hope JacK is feeling okay. This is a crucial time now that Parliament is back in session and opposition can hammer the PM for shutting down democracy for the past 3 months and killing all those bills, and the opposition can ressurect the torture questions and other policy issues.

  This is an excellant opportunity, now and over the next three months, to get the NDP up to 25% popularity.

Caissa

Jack looked great on the Mercer Report last night.

Stockholm

I think it makes a lot of sense for the NDP to go after the votes of senior citizens. The fact is that they are a growing demographic, they vote in droves and up until now, we have tended to underperform - even though seniors tend to depend on the health care system and old age pensions - and these are NDP strengths as issues. Also, seniors tend to skew female and the NDP tends to do better with women. If the NDP could achieve a goal of getting as high a percentage of the seniors vote as we now get with "boomers" (ie: 45-64 year olds)

We certainly can't ignore younger voters - but as we all know, you can knock yourslef out trying to be "groovy" to the 18-24 year old demo and then when push comes to shove 75% of them don't vote and those that do largely play pin the tail on the donkey with their ballots.

NorthReport

Heritage Day, or whatever it is called in your home province, has been creeping ahead on the third Monday in February and is even included as a stat in some collective agreements. The NDP needs to promote and push this into an official Canadian stat - Tommy Douglas Day! This would be the day to celebrate all the good things that the NDP has created such as healthcare for all Canadian people/families.

Rocker Rocker's picture

Life is not getting better. I'd focus on the failures of the Libs/Cons, specifically things like:

- 1980-2006 hardworking Canadians saw no income gains - the wealthiest 20% took it all.

- Free Trade & NAFTA destroyed jobs/families all over the country.

- The 1989 all-party resolution to end child poverty by 2000 - all Lib/Con governments have failed miserably.

I'd like to see a more us vs them class war approach.

Take full advantage of the mood of the country and put the current owners and managers on the hot seat and let's see them defend their excess wealth and privilege.

 

 

Sean in Ottawa

The fact that the NDP is led by a good leader is one good thing-- that the party has lots of people able to step up while Layton gets treatment is an indication of the Party's strength- that is not a bad thing either.

As I ahve said before-- a strong platform and campaign are essential to bringing a polling number in the mid 20s or better home in an election.

I do think that everythign is already in place for the NDP to hit high poll numbers and that more needs to be done for it to bring those home in an election.

It is also worth pointing out that to be in this situation while the Liebrals are out of power is particularly telling as usually the NDP does best under an unpopular Liberal government not competing with the Liberals in opposition (the big exception was in 1988).

Sean in Ottawa

Rocker wrote:

Life is not getting better. I'd focus on the failures of the Libs/Cons, specifically things like:

- 1980-2006 hardworking Canadians saw no income gains - the wealthiest 20% took it all.

- Free Trade & NAFTA destroyed jobs/families all over the country.

- The 1989 all-party resolution to end child poverty by 2000 - all Lib/Con governments have failed miserably.

I'd like to see a more us vs them class war approach.

Take full advantage of the mood of the country and put the current owners and managers on the hot seat and let's see them defend their excess wealth and privilege.

There's merit to this

Rocker Rocker's picture

The second area is youth focused. Point out how since the mid 70's every high school/uni graduating class has entered the work force with lower real wages than the previous class.

Fidel

I think that a campaign to scrap NAFTA would be futile. The NDP already waged election campaigns against CUSFTA and NAFTA, and the Liberals outperformed us when they lied to Canadians telling voters that they were the most anti-FTA party in 1993. The result was NAFTA by 1994. And even though a large majority of Canadians voted against NAFTA by voting either NDP or Liberal in 1993, the last opinion polls taken show Canadians support free trade with the US in general, and even though they don't really understand how harmful the very ridiculous NAFTA agreement has been for Canadians in terms of full-time higher paying jobs and economic sovereignty lost, and that some 35 key sectors of our economy are now majority foreign-owned and controlled and mostly by Americans. The NDP would have to focus far too many resources on informing Canadians of the disaster that FTA-NAFTA is for Canada. And we would need grassroots and civil society groups to focus all of their resources on this single aim of scrapping NAFTA. I think the NDP is taking the correct approach stating that it will renegotiate NAFTA toward protecting Canadian labour and environmental interests. I don't like the way our FPTP system pretty much dictates how parties campaign in order to appeal to some large minority of voters, but I think it's all we can do under the circumstances without sabotaging our own chances for election.

Rocker Rocker's picture

Who's talking about a campaign to scrap NAFTA? I'm talking about a campaign to blame the Libs/Cons for 40 years of less-money-in-our-pockets.

It's high time the left started kicking some ass.

George Victor

The two actions would go together nicely, Rocker, but a question:  whose ass? 

ottawaobserver

Just wanted to point out that one NDP member or another has had a private members' bill on the Order Paper for the last 30 years calling for a Tommy Douglas Day or Stanley Knowles Day stat holiday in February.

As to the suggestion that Jack have more media availability sessions for the national media, I'd invite you to do a review of how many he has had that don't get covered. The english national media is derisory about him and the NDP as someone put it elsewhere here recently, and have to be carefully managed. I'm certain that Layton's improved leadership numbers have come as much or more from the regional media coverage he gets when he travels, as from anything originating from out of Ottawa.

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

I like Sean's take on things.

I've often felt that politics is the art of being ready to capitalize when opportunity strikes.

Since Jack has become leader, I've felt that the NDP has continued to prepare for that opportunity.

The party has a leader who is increasingly popular in the polls, it's raising more money, getting better candidates in place earlier, and improving its ground game.  And while I don't think there is a magic policy that will change things, I've noticed that the Federal NDP is developing platforms that are deeper and wider - leaving the impresson that they actually put some thought into these things and are ready to govern.

I think that if Canadians tire of Stephen Harper (it's a big if) the NDP is well placed to make that leap to 25% or more. But, I suspect that, barring some game changing event, that will have to happen in an election.

Fidel

Rocker wrote:

Who's talking about a campaign to scrap NAFTA? I'm talking about a campaign to blame the Libs/Cons for 40 years of less-money-in-our-pockets.

I hear you Rocker. I don't know whether you mean that we should wage a US-style negative ad campaign, but apparently even that can back-fire unless done properly. I tend to like what the NDP is doing now with putting out a balanced platform and not too heavy on any one dish or side order. I think very many voters look for simple reasons to vote for a party. And I think that very many Canadians are not political science gurus like most babblers are. The people who post here I think have higher than average interest in Canadian politics and economy. How many people have we met whose only comment on politics is to say something like, Oh they're all the same, or I don't vote because the same parties win all the time. And i've even heard some ask me, Why bother? Nothing ever changes anyway? I think we could spend some time explaining why nothing ever changes, or why nothing changes when they vote for the same two parties that have been in power and sharing power in Ottawa non-stop since 1867. I think Canadians are beginning to realize that politicians who come to expect political power have been taking voters for granted for a long time.

NorthReport

OO Re your post #28

You are right on the money about the press. A good example is the NDP's position on withdrawing our troops from Afghanistan. The NDP position is clear, and has always been clear: "Canadian troops out of Afghanistan" but you would never know it from reading the nonsense in the mainstream press, who constantly distort what Layton says and does.  

David Young

What will lift the NDP to 25% support in the polls?

Two words.....

Quality candidates!

The quality of the candidates that Jack Layton has been able to bring to the NDP team since he became leader in 2003 has been the main reason why NDP support has slowly, but steadily, increased since then.

Having repeat candidates in ridings where the NDP is best positioned to win will deliver more seats whenever the next election takes place: 

Ryan Cleary, St. John's South-Mt. Pearl,

Gordon Earle, South Shore-St. Margaret's,

Francoise Boivin, Gatineau,

Taras Natyshak, Essex,

Tania Cameron, Kenora,

Peggy Nash, Parkdale-High Park,

Nettie Wiebe, Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar,

Ray Martin, Edmonton East,

Michael Crawford, Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo,

Catherine Bell, Vancouver Island North.

Once the list of candidates fills up where the NDP have yet to nominate, and the voters see who their potential M.P. could be, watch the level of support rise once again.

I think!

 

yarg

Well who knows, but im sure that Layton moving other peoples arms out of the way so he can be seen celebrating the mens Olympic hockey win isn't going to help much.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XM76KN3HVv0&

oldgoat

Only people who buy into that CTV crap.

NorthReport

Exactly og.

That you tube video was produced by "The Torontoist" owned by Globe and Mail Liberal Party commentator Robert Silver.

The Liberals look like they are worried, very worried about Layton and the NDP, with silly and sleazy Liberal tactics like this.

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

yarg wrote:

Well who knows, but im sure that Layton moving other peoples arms out of the way so he can be seen celebrating the mens Olympic hockey win isn't going to help much.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XM76KN3HVv0&

Worst attempted smear ever!

Really?  You think this is an issue?  You and 0.0000001% of the population, made up entirerly of partisan Tories pissed off that Layton got more air time during the big game than Harper, and partisan Liberals upset that a) they didn't think of it and b) if they had they would have had to convince Ignatieff to rub sholders with real people rather than spend the afternoon reading poetry in the Stornaway library.

 

Fidel

Yeah Jack and Olivia didn't rate an exclusive private viewing box like Harper and Jean. I wonder if Canadian taxpayers are on the hook for their excellent vacation at the Olympics.

ottawaobserver

David, you're right about quality candidates making seats suddenly winnable.  Look at Jack Harris in St. John's East, for example.

By the way, I started following Ryan Cleary's blog recently; he's a very good writer and quite interesting.

Bookish Agrarian

In some ways I think a good strategy is to ignore the national media to some extent.  Not all together of course, but regional and particularly local media are willing to print/show just about anything if it has a local angle.  Don't ignore the small town weeklies either. THe Liberals and to a lesser degree the Conservatives are masters at this, bringing in a critic to talk about the kind of policies we need on such and such an issue and they get all kinds of coverage money can't buy.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

What will lift the NDP to 25% support in the polls?

Two words.....

Quality candidates!

 

Catchy slogans!

Doug

Colour-coordinated wardrobe! Laughing

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Door Prizes!

ottawaobserver

A chicken in every pot?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Some pot in every chicken(if Dana Larsen tries for a comeback)?

Vansterdam Kid

NorthReport wrote:

 

The NDP absolutely need some exciting new policies to market to the voters such as ensuring pension portability, vacations based on age, education and training available to all, the best health care system on the planet, etc.  - programs that are going to make the masses rise up and say "Yea, I want that!"

Buddy Kat

I'm glad you mentioned Tommy Douglas.

We need to push for a Tommy Douglas National Holiday Day in Canada so that we can have a special day to celebrate all the wonderful programs the CCF/NDP has delivered on in the past. 

 

Re: Age based vacations: that policy might appeal to voters in the boomer and up category depending on where they are in their careers, but it won't appeal to to generation X'ers and younger. In fact, most Millennial voters cherish their time, can't see themselves doing whatever it is their doing for another five years, let alone the rest of their lives and are willing to take LWOP's, so long as they can have as much time as possible to do things like travel, take a few more classes or go on an educational exchange. I think what would be more appealing to far more employees of all demographics, though probably not employers since they are rather cheap with paid vacation, is to mandate a minimum paid holiday requirement along the lines of European countries such as France. Let's say 6 paid weeks (or 30 individual days) per 40 hours/week of work (which tends to be "full time" status - though sometimes that can be more like 35 hours/week so they would only be entitled to 5.25 weeks or 26.25 days), with proration scaled to give paid vacation to anyone who works less than that including auxiliary and part-time status employees. Employers often love to give people these statuses so that they can screw them out of benefits like this. So say you averaged 27 hours of work per week at X job, you'll then be entitled to about 4 weeks (or 20 individual days) of paid vacation.

As for the Tommy Douglas idea, it sounds great to me. Though I don't expect to see that implemented any time soon, ie. before the NDP forms a government.

Vansterdam Kid

Fidel wrote:

Yeah Jack and Olivia didn't rate an exclusive private viewing box like Harper and Jean. I wonder if Canadian taxpayers are on the hook for their excellent vacation at the Olympics.

 

Yep, the BC government, our crown corporations and even Vancouver's municipal government spent taxpayers dollars on tickets for "VIP's" that I'm sure went to people like Harper and Jean.

Link:

http://www.straight.com/article-292932/vancouver/critic-wants-freebies-t...

Caissa

The Conservatives are retaining their three-percentage-point lead over the Liberals, according to a new EKOS poll.

Asked which party they would support if an election were held tomorrow, 32.4 per of those polled backed the Conservatives, while the Liberals had the backing of 29.4 per cent.

NDP support stood at 15.2 per cent, the Green Party had 10.5 per cent, and the Bloc Québécois 9.4 per cent.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/politics/story/2010/03/03/ekos-voter-intention-poll.html#ixzz0hDMOu5iP

johnpauljones

To get up to 25% the NDP and Jack have to stand for something not against something. what I mean is it is just not good enough to say Harper is bad and then vote for harpers policies when push comes to shove. If the NDP wants to be at 25% then they have to act like the government in waiting. ignore the liberals and continue to present policy options that canadians whether rich or middle class, working or unemployed will support.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Caissa wrote:
NDP support stood at 15.2 per cent,

That's a far cry from the 20% mentioned in the thread title, and much further away from that optimistic goal of 25%... Frown

remind remind's picture

Funny have not seen the NDP paying any attention to the Liberals at all...perhaps that is what is making Liberals crazy, and indeed Iggy too, his scrum last night was less than stellar, and indeed I would bet his ratings take a trip back down.

 

NorthReport

Most people realize that EKOS pimps for the Liberals polling via their media outlets the CBC & Toronto Star. That's why Liberal party supporters always like to promote their results. Wink

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