Wounded NDP

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Pondering
Wounded NDP

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Pondering

Should say "wounded and out of touch".

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2016/09/18/news/wounded-ndp-explores-way...

The federal NDP will turn to its network of social activists to woo progressives back to the party fold this fall, according to the party's new national director.

Nearly a year after the last election, New Democrats are trying to stop the bleed of support to Justin Trudeau's Liberals.

Robert Fox, a former Oxfam executive who was recently named NDP national director, said there are many activists who are not connected to the party and could be.

"We need to reach out and ensure that all the sorts of people who are working on the issues that we are working on, that they feel we are open to them and we are looking for their participation, we are looking for their ideas we are looking for their energy, we are looking for their passion," Fox said.

A direct appeal to the left was on the tip of Tom Mulcair's tongue at the party's caucus meeting in Montreal last week, where he defined the party's core values as "environmentalism, pacifism, feminism and socialism."

To do that the NDP will have to cut the crap and stop pretending they have been working on the issues social activists have been working on. The NDP may have skated around the edges but they have otherwise deserted the left to the extent that the Liberals were able to run left of them which should never have been possible.

Environmentalism means standing up against new pipelines and holding the oil industry responsible for shutting down their own wells properly instead of expecting tax-payers to pick up the tab.

Pacifism the NDP is a bit better on but not so much as to condemn Israel for their continued illegal settlement program.

Feminism, great that there are more female MPs but the NDP has twice used feminism inappropriately to attack Trudeau.

Socialism, please, that stopped being a core value a long time ago.

Aristotleded24

Let's see if I can do this pancake recipie from memory:

1 egg

1.25 cups of milk

100mL cooking or canola oil

1 tbsp sugar

2 tsp baking soda

1 cup of flour

Combine the dry ingredients with the egg. Next add the oil and milk and mix. Set your cooking surface to a temperature of 375 degrees Celsius. Pour the batter on the surface, and flip when ready. This receipe makes about 10 pancakes.

What about the rest of you guys? What have you all had for breakfast this morning?

mark_alfred

I had oatmeal, which is typically what I have.  So,

1/2 cup of oatmeal (large flakes, the slower cooking type -- not instant)

just over 1 cup of water (300 ml or so)

raisons

dried cranberries

some unsalted sunflower seeds

Add ingredients, bring to a boil.  Turn down the heat and simmer for 5 minutes or so.  Brew a cup of coffee.  Then, put the oatmeal in a bowl, pour in some soymilk, and have the coffee with some soymilk as well. 

quizzical

i had rye toast with BC peach jam i made.....

along with fresh ground 3 sisters kickinghorse coffee. i like junk in my coffee so i use southern butter pecan creamer. 

mark_alfred

3 sisters kickinghorse coffee!  Great stuff.  Yeah, I just had No-name industrial coffee myself, but I do quite like the kickinghorse coffee.

quizzical

i like the Hola kickinghorse but so does e1 in town i guess.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I had my regular breakfast of 2 boiled eggs, 2 pieces of multi-grain toast with butter and coffee. I always get World Community coffee since it is great coffee and helps support good causes. There is even a bakery in my village that sells it and gives all the profit from the sales to help buy the forest near our Village.

 

http://www.worldcommunity.ca/fair-trade-products/

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Sean in Ottawa

mark_alfred wrote:

I had oatmeal, which is typically what I have.  So,

1/2 cup of oatmeal (large flakes, the slower cooking type -- not instant)

just over 1 cup of water (300 ml or so)

raisons

dried cranberries

some unsalted sunflower seeds

Add ingredients, bring to a boil.  Turn down the heat and simmer for 5 minutes or so.  Brew a cup of coffee.  Then, put the oatmeal in a bowl, pour in some soymilk, and have the coffee with some soymilk as well. 

 

They say that oatmeal leaves you feeling full longer for the calories it includes so it is actually an excellent food if you are dieting a bit. Nevermind this, I find I like oatmeal but have been wondering what types of non-standard flavourings I could use to keep it interesting. Yes, I know the cinnamon raison thing is nice. I have tried maple as well but would like other ideas.

Has anyone tried putting tea in oatmeal? I thought of it but have not actually tried it yet but I don't see why not.

Frozen cherries I did not like...

Sean in Ottawa

quizzical wrote:

i had rye toast with BC peach jam i made.....

along with fresh ground 3 sisters kickinghorse coffee. i like junk in my coffee so i use southern butter pecan creamer. 

 

This sounds really good. I don't eat much bread these days but rye is great -- along with sourdough. I am sure your BC peach jam is wonderful.... I remember having some peach jam at one time that somebody put alcohol in -- rhum maybe? and raisins.

sherpa-finn

Crunchy granola, topped with homemade apple sauce and yoghurt and 'Just Us' coffee.

Simple tastes for simple folk. 

lagatta

I like my porridge savoury, not sweet. Either the large flake or pinhead oats. If you make it savoury, you can even make it with poultry or vegetable stock. Nuts are a good addition. So are mild onions, such as red onions, which do make it just a bit sweet. You can find flakes and grits of grains other than oats - some buckwheat is a very good addition, as are rye flakes. I make it quite thick, more like polenta or kasha (which is a porridge_ than "gruel". That way you can have it in a shallow dish with an egg or some fish if you eat fish: sardines, herring including kippers, that sort of thing. I like a breakfast with a fair bit of protein, though not something as greasy as a Full English or its North American derivatives.

Caffeine is an essential; I used to like builder's tea as much as espresso coffee, but the tannin bothers me now early in the morning. My drug of choice is Café Rico (a local organic and fairtrade roaster) but if I'm too skint it is rather generic Italian espresso.

swallow swallow's picture

My kid has just informed me he likes the savoury oatmeal better than the sweet, which is welcome news. But I think he'd still prefer the pancakes. 

This year, we are going to help make the maple sap into syrup at a nearby cabane a sucre. Should be fun.

Sean in Ottawa

lagatta wrote:

I like my porridge savoury, not sweet. Either the large flake or pinhead oats. If you make it savoury, you can even make it with poultry or vegetable stock. Nuts are a good addition. So are mild onions, such as red onions, which do make it just a bit sweet. You can find flakes and grits of grains other than oats - some buckwheat is a very good addition, as are rye flakes. I make it quite thick, more like polenta or kasha (which is a porridge_ than "gruel". That way you can have it in a shallow dish with an egg or some fish if you eat fish: sardines, herring including kippers, that sort of thing. I like a breakfast with a fair bit of protein, though not something as greasy as a Full English or its North American derivatives.

Caffeine is an essential; I used to like builder's tea as much as espresso coffee, but the tannin bothers me now early in the morning. My drug of choice is Café Rico (a local organic and fairtrade roaster) but if I'm too skint it is rather generic Italian espresso.

 

I am going to try this... I like variety.

I also like spicy things so will experiement there.

I wonder if you can make a nice curry oatmeal?

lagatta

Of course you can. And I'm sure South Asian migrants to the Celtic Fringe have done so for quite a while.

 

 

mark_alfred

Sounds interesting.

For a while I switched to tea from coffee.  I'm back to coffee now but I do also enjoy tea.  Chai tea is neat sometimes (I make it with half tea and half warm soy milk).

jjuares

Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

quizzical

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I had my regular breakfast of 2 boiled eggs, 2 pieces of multi-grain toast with butter and coffee. I always get World Community coffee since it is great coffee and helps support good causes. There is even a bakery in my village that sells it and gives all the profit from the sales to help buy the forest near our Village.

 

">http://www.worldcommunity.ca/fair-trade-products/

there's a roaster  in McBride who belongs to the world community fair trade. great coffee.

Unionist

quizzical

jjuares wrote:
Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.

Caissa

Some reference that poem as Ogden Nash, Unionist.

jjuares

quizzical wrote:

jjuares wrote:
Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.


When I was in Washington State I tried something called " huckleberries". They had huckleberry pop and huckleberry everything. I tried the jam but wasn't overly impressed.

Sean in Ottawa

mark_alfred wrote:

Sounds interesting.

For a while I switched to tea from coffee.  I'm back to coffee now but I do also enjoy tea.  Chai tea is neat sometimes (I make it with half tea and half warm soy milk).

 

Masala Cahir is my favorite. I am going to go make some now! I just put regular 1% milk in but it is really great.

jjuares

quizzical wrote:

jjuares wrote:
Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.


Chokecherries? They are somewhat tart too?

jjuares

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

lagatta wrote:

I like my porridge savoury, not sweet. Either the large flake or pinhead oats. If you make it savoury, you can even make it with poultry or vegetable stock. Nuts are a good addition. So are mild onions, such as red onions, which do make it just a bit sweet. You can find flakes and grits of grains other than oats - some buckwheat is a very good addition, as are rye flakes. I make it quite thick, more like polenta or kasha (which is a porridge_ than "gruel". That way you can have it in a shallow dish with an egg or some fish if you eat fish: sardines, herring including kippers, that sort of thing. I like a breakfast with a fair bit of protein, though not something as greasy as a Full English or its North American derivatives.

Caffeine is an essential; I used to like builder's tea as much as espresso coffee, but the tannin bothers me now early in the morning. My drug of choice is Café Rico (a local organic and fairtrade roaster) but if I'm too skint it is rather generic Italian espresso.

 

I am going to try this... I like variety.

I also like spicy things so will experiement there.

I wonder if you can make a nice curry oatmeal?


I only eat porridge in the winter. It just feels like it is a cold weather food.

quizzical

jjuares wrote:
quizzical wrote:
jjuares wrote:
Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.

When I was in Washington State I tried something called " huckleberries". They had huckleberry pop and huckleberry everything. I tried the jam but wasn't overly impressed.

when i lived in Sooke there was huckleberries in the old logging blocks and i made it all the time. love huckleberry jam. there's huckleberries here too but so far out and into the bush you have to camp overnight to have any time in the day to pick any amount. then your competing with the grizzes.

quizzical

jjuares wrote:
quizzical wrote:
jjuares wrote:
Recently I bought some jam made from Saskatoon berries. This jam on toast is really the perfect breakfast.

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.

Chokecherries? They are somewhat tart too?

i don't know. never had anything made from them. only listened to my mom say how wonderful they are.

Aristotleded24

Sounds like you all have great taste. We'll all have to get together for a big breakfast potluck sometime and share our delicious ideas!Smile

Doug Woodard

quizzical wrote:

my mom made some wild raspberry jam this summer. great stuff. we did not do Saskatoon or wild blueberry though first time in years we missed.

i wanna get to chokecherries sometime and make some.

Regarding chokecherrries, watch that you pick them ripe or the tannins will get you. I don't know if there is regional variation in the flavour.

Plants of chokecherry cultivars can be bought on the Prairies and in Quebec.

Doug Woodard

Caissa wrote:

Some reference that poem as Ogden Nash, Unionist.

I'v seen it referenced as from the 18th century.

Sean in Ottawa

I wanted a treat so I chopped some candied ginger into my oatmeal. Scary good.

Thought I would share-- anyone else tried that?