Federal Election - 2015

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NorthReport
Federal Election - 2015

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NorthReport

Ha! Ha! Ha!

You had better believe Jason Kenney and/or Stephen Harper, or whoever will lead that motley crew for the Cons into the next election, want this Conservative / Liberal Senate Scandal out of the way, and out of the eyes of the Canadian voters, long before the next election.

Senate moving to suspend Pamela Wallin, Mike Duffy Embattled Duffy requests medical leave of absence in letter to Senate Speaker

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/senate-moving-to-suspend-pamela-wallin-m...

janfromthebruce

Duffy was trying to go for the medical Con witness protection program. No matter he will still get suspended without pay.

NorthReport

Let's not forget Liberal Senator Mac or whatever Harb.

NorthReport

Oh, that's right, that Liberasl Senator quit the Senate thinking he wouldn't get caught or whatever

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/mac-harb-resigns-from-senat...

janfromthebruce

No NR, he quit so no matter what happens (such as found guilty in a court of law) he will still be able to collect his well worth it pension while serving time in jail.

He would join his former Liberal seat mate, Raymond Lavigne who is presently jailed for falsifying his travel claims and abusing his office.

Raymond Lavigne, Former Liberal Senator, Denied Early Parole

In 2011, Lavigne was sentenced to six months in jail, six months of house arrest and ordered to give $10,000 to charity for falsifying travel claims and abusing his office by asking a research assistant to cut trees on his property during Senate work hours.

The board found Lavigne expressed little remorse for his crimes.

"Every public office holder must be held accountable to a higher standard and your actions demonstrate a severe departure from these standards," the decision reads.

snip

When asked if he assumed responsibility for his crimes, the former Liberal senator, who was kicked out of caucus after a Senate committee in 2006 found he had abused his office and ordered him to pay back $23,000, remained defiant.

"I have not committed any crimes, I have not killed anyone," Lavigne told them.

As mentioned above although he must serve his remaining time, he gets his full pension. Likewise, Harb will also get his full pension if he serves time in jail for ripping off the public.

As an aside, if this Lib senator gets jail time, along with Duffy and Wallin, they all will be wearing orange jumpsuits as their jail garb - revenge of the Orange Crush.

Brachina

Another corrupt Liberal Senator, abolish the senate.

socialdemocrati...

It's just a fundamentally corrupt institution. It speaks to the Canadian government's history as an institution of patronage.

NorthReport

Liberals are a bit more politically astute than the Cons. The Liberals tried to get their their slimeball in the Senate out of sight before the Cons got their slimeball Senators out of sight.  Laughing

Wilf Day

Is John McCallum retiring? That's big news.

Juanita Nathan has announced she will be seeking the federal Liberal nomination in the new riding of Markham-Thornhill.

The "new" Markham-Thornhill riding comes 72% from McCallum's present riding of Markham--Unionville, and has a transposed Liberal majority of 292 votes.

McCallum's present riding of Markham--Unionville goes 55% to new Markham--Thornhill, and only 37% to "new Markham--Unionville", which has a transposed Conservative majority of 4745 votes, 12.16%, due to 51% of "new Markham--Unionville" coming from the old Oak Ridges--Markham held by Conservative Paul Calandra. Not that Calandra is likely to run in "new Markham--Unionville" since the largest portion of Calandra's riding goes to Markham—Stouffville, an even safer Tory seat with a transposed Conservative majority of 21.48%.

Redistribution has given York Region three new ridings: Markham—Unionville, Aurora—Oak Ridges--Richmond Hill, and King—Vaughan. These are all open ridings, not successor ridings. Despite the confusion of names, new Markham--Unionville is NOT the successor riding to McCallum's riding, nor would he want to run there.

McCallum will be 65 at the time of the 2015 election. No reason why he shouldn't retire. But I doubt Justin Trudeau wanted this news to come out right now.

But would a York Region District School Board trustee, a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, who serves on the board for Canadian Mental Health Association – York and South Simcoe, York Region Equity Council and with the Canadian Tamil Congress, accidentally declare in McCallum's riding? 

Wilf Day

Markham Mard 7 Councillor Logan Kanapathi will seek the Liberal nomination in the new Scarborough North riding.

Two things wrong with this story:

First, Markham Ward 7 is 75% in new Markham--Thornhill (which would be McCallum's riding but fellow Tamil Juanita Nathan wants to run there), and 25% in new Markham--Stouffville (90% of which is from the present Oak Ridges--Markham and should be a safe Tory seat for incumbent Paul Calandra).

Second, Scarborough North is not a new riding, but is the successor to Scarborough--Rouge River (Rathika Sitsabaiesan's seat), since 70% of its population goes to Scarborough North, while only 30% of it goes to the really new seat of Scarborough--Rouge Park. (Forty-nine percent of Scarborough--Rouge Park comes from the present Pickering--Scarborough East, but 57% of the present Pickering--Scarborough East goes to new Pickering—Uxbridge, so Scarborough--Rouge Park is one of Ontario's 15 new seats.) 

Hopefullly Scarborough North will send Logan Kanapathi back to Markham.

sherpa-finn

Hey, Wilf - I have no opinion on who the Liberals may choose to run in Markham-Thornhill, but I would warn all Canadians to be wary of any individual who places at the top of their CV the fact that they are a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Even Warren Kinsella and The Sun saw through that whole misguided exercise in pomp, puffery and patronage.

http://www.torontosun.com/2013/02/08/queens-diamond-jubilee-medals-a-fiasco

NorthReport

I trust many Canadians will be watching Duffy's explosive testimony in the Senate today on the TV News tonite.

This could eventually bring down the House of Harper and the Canadian government, and  the Liberals are caught up in this huge and growing by the day scandal as well.

Be very vigilant for what will sure to be Liberal dirty tricks over this, but it could work out that Canada will see its first NDP government, whenever these dirty Conservatives dare to call the election.

Stay tuned. 

NorthReport

I am telling you sir, this is not Conservative scandal as much as a Liberal and a Conservative Senate scandal, or scam, whichever you wish to call it, because, did you know:

Quote:
Conservative Senator Marjory LeBreton pointed out to reporters Tuesday that the Senate has suspended a senator without pay once before, in the case of Liberal Senator Andrew Thompson, for not attending Senate sittings.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mike-duffy-claims-harper-told-him-to-rep...

After all, where else can you get paid for a job and not show up to work. I mean where do you appy, eh.

Oh, that's right, the friggin' frat house for Liberals and Conservatives: the Canadian Senate!!!

 

scott16

does anyone have info on candidates running in 2015 that also ran in 2011?

Lewis Cardinal? Anyone who came close to winning last time?

David Young

scott16 wrote:

does anyone have info on candidates running in 2015 that also ran in 2011?

Lewis Cardinal? Anyone who came close to winning last time?

Candidates can't be nominated until after the new boundaries are passed by Parliament.  Only then will we start finding out which candidates from 2011 will be trying again.

 

scott16

David Young wrote:

scott16 wrote:

does anyone have info on candidates running in 2015 that also ran in 2011?

Lewis Cardinal? Anyone who came close to winning last time?

Candidates can't be nominated until after the new boundaries are passed by Parliament.  Only then will we start finding out which candidates from 2011 will be trying again.

 

Thank you when do they finalize the new ridings?

David Young

What I've heard from the executive of the South Shore-St. Margaret's NDP members is they are expecting the legislation creating the new boundaries to be put through Parliament next spring, and passed by the Senate (if they can manage that!), so that by the sumemr of 2014 riding E.P.C.'s can start to submit the names to potental candidates to the national executive and then the O.K. is given to schedule a nomination meeting.

If I am mistaken, I'm sure some babble member will correct me!

 

Wilf Day

David Young wrote:

What I've heard from the executive of the South Shore-St. Margaret's NDP members is they are expecting the legislation creating the new boundaries to be put through Parliament next spring, and passed by the Senate (if they can manage that!), so that by the sumemr of 2014 riding E.P.C.'s can start to submit the names to potental candidates to the national executive and then the O.K. is given to schedule a nomination meeting.

If I am mistaken, I'm sure some babble member will correct me!

The South Shore-St. Margaret's NDP members must have been too busy with the provincial election to pay attention. The new federal ridings are now final. No Act of Parliament is required. The Senate has no role. The Nova Scotia riding boundaries were final March 18, 2013.

The one exception is that Maria Mourani said she was appealing the changes in her riding to a Court, an option open to any MP who can pay the costs. Yvon Godin was successful in his appeal ten years ago. Now that she is out of the Bloc, will she have to drop her appeal?

David Young wrote:
Candidates can't be nominated until after the new boundaries are passed by Parliament. Only then will we start finding out which candidates from 2011 will be trying again.

Candidates can be nominated as soon as the federal party allows it, that is, lifts the freeze which is imposed to prevent someone getting themselves nominated too far in advance.   

scott16

With the Mike Duffy scandal and the Robocall scandal and the missing (my guess stolen) 3.1 billion anti-terrorism money, does anyone believe that the Cons could be destroyed like 1993? (we could only hope) Or could Harper steal the election in 2015?

clambake

Somewhere in the middle, most likely. I can't see them going lower than 80 seats, but it would be great to see

Policywonk

Wilf Day wrote:

David Young wrote:

What I've heard from the executive of the South Shore-St. Margaret's NDP members is they are expecting the legislation creating the new boundaries to be put through Parliament next spring, and passed by the Senate (if they can manage that!), so that by the sumemr of 2014 riding E.P.C.'s can start to submit the names to potental candidates to the national executive and then the O.K. is given to schedule a nomination meeting.

If I am mistaken, I'm sure some babble member will correct me!

The South Shore-St. Margaret's NDP members must have been too busy with the provincial election to pay attention. The new federal ridings are now final. No Act of Parliament is required. The Senate has no role. The Nova Scotia riding boundaries were final March 18, 2013.

The one exception is that Maria Mourani said she was appealing the changes in her riding to a Court, an option open to any MP who can pay the costs. Yvon Godin was successful in his appeal ten years ago. Now that she is out of the Bloc, will she have to drop her appeal?

David Young wrote:
Candidates can't be nominated until after the new boundaries are passed by Parliament. Only then will we start finding out which candidates from 2011 will be trying again.

Candidates can be nominated as soon as the federal party allows it, that is, lifts the freeze which is imposed to prevent someone getting themselves nominated too far in advance.   

New district associations haven't been set up yet, even if the new boundaries are final, so there is no structure in place to nominate candidates.

Aristotleded24

With the Conservatives possibly about to lose Brandon Souris, and Ted Menzies' retirement in Alberta, there is a remote possibility that Harper drops to minority status and loses a confidence vote. Should that happen, would that election be contested along the current constituency boundaries or the new ones?

Policywonk

Aristotleded24 wrote:

With the Conservatives possibly about to lose Brandon Souris, and Ted Menzies' retirement in Alberta, there is a remote possibility that Harper drops to minority status and loses a confidence vote. Should that happen, would that election be contested along the current constituency boundaries or the new ones?

This gives the answer. May 1, 2014. Any election after that date is contested on the new boundaries.

http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=res&dir=cir/red&document=in...

As for the Conservatives falling to minority status, that is an extremely remote possibility as they still have a 16 seat majority.

NorthReport

Are these the current party standings?

Cons - 161

NDP - 100

Libs - 34

BQ - 4

Ind - 4

Grn - 1

Vacant - 4

Total = 308

Policywonk

NorthReport wrote:

Are these the current party standings?

Cons - 161

NDP - 100

Libs - 34

BQ - 4

Ind - 4

Grn - 1

Vacant - 4

Total = 308

160 Conservatives and 5 vacant. Ted Menzies (Macleod) resigned a few weeks ago to take a lobbying position. Which means a majority of 12 I think.

NorthReport

Tks Pw

------

7 ways Thomas Mulcair aims to change Canada’s energy landscape

by Andrew Leach 

(Jeff McIntosh/CP)

If there were any doubt that an NDP government would bring a different approach to energy policy than what we’ve seen under Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government, those doubts were laid to rest on Tuesday in a speech Thomas Mulcair gave to the Economic Club of Canada.  The speech included no fewer than seven significant policy positions, not all of them new.  These positions are a combination of Mr. Mulcair’s historic strengths and some red meat for the NDP base.  There’s nowhere near enough detail provided to evaluate any of these policies, so hopefully we’ll see more of that in the weeks and months to come, but kudos to Mr. Mulcair for putting the first bits on the table.

1. Cap-and-trade carbon

The first major policy statement comes in two parts.  Mr. Mulcair states that an NDP government will, “rise to meet our international climate change obligations by creating a cap-and-trade system that puts a clear market price on carbon.” By our international obligations, we have to assume that he’s referring to the Harper government’s Copenhagen commitment to reduce our emissions to levels 17% below where they were in 2005 by the year 2020.  Arecent report from Environment Canada showed that, with current federal and provincial policies in place, our emissions are expected to be less than 1% below our 2005 levels by 2020. If we don’t do something, and fast, we’ll miss our target by about 3 times today’s emissions from the oil sands.

If my reading is correct, a policy to meet the Copenhagen targets agreed to by Prime Minister Harper would be a step back for the NDP. In their 2011 election platform, the NDP had committed to re-instate theClimate Change Accountability Act (C-311) which called for emissions reductions to 25% below 1990 levels (35% below 2005 levels) by 2020.  Still, a commitment to a cap-and-trade policy to meet the Copenhagen commitments would represent one of the most stringent GHG policy commitments worldwide. Assuming the policy would cover most emissions in the economy, a cap that tight would almost certainly lead to market prices for emissions above $100/t.  For reference, a GHG cost in that range would impose a cost for the emissions generated from burning gasoline of about 25 cents per litre, and would increase oil sands production costs by $5-10 per barrel depending on the facility.

Let’s be clear – if Canada is to meet its commitments, we need policies which impose these types of costs on industry or on consumers, either through regulations, taxes, or a requirement to possess scarce permits for emissions.  Most economists would advocate for the carbon pricing approach embodied in carbon taxes or cap-and-trade, as proposed by the NDP, because these policies allow the market to work to find the cheapest ways to reduce emissions. Regulatory approaches rely on government bureaucrats to determine where emissions are best allowed to occur and through which technology, and so tend to be less cost-effective (although more stringent regulations may be more politically palatable than high taxes or high-priced cap-and-trade).  The NDP are clearly betting that Canadians do want stringent GHG policy – I guess we’ll see if they’ll vote for it.

2. Resolve First Nations land claims

3. Refine more resources in Canada

4. Clarify foreign investment rules…somehow

5. Reintroduce tax breaks for energy-efficient home renovations

6. Shift tax breaks to renewable energy

7. Make environmental assessments more independent…sort of

 

So, what are the takeaways? First, Mr. Mulcair and the NDP are clearly serious about redefining energy policy in this country.  Second, on energy policy, there really is no left and right any more – it’s us versus them or, in some cases, our proposal which used to be their proposal vs. their proposal which used to be ours. Third, both party leaders are loathe to move key energy infrastructure decisions outside of cabinet. Finally, there’s a long road to 2015, but with Justin Trudeau’s speech last month in Calgary and this one from Mr. Mulcair, it’s clear energy will be a key issue on that road.  I couldn’t be happier – it’s a discussion we need to have.

 

 

 

http://www2.macleans.ca/2013/12/06/seven-ways-ndp-leader-thomas-mulcair-...

socialdemocrati...

It's interesting to see an attempt to analyze the NDP's energy policy in a way that at least tries to be neutral. But if the media is gonna keep giving a free pass to parties making non-positions, then presenting policy positions is always going to come across as a mistake or a mis-step. Which is bad for democracy.

 

NorthReport

Harper has been quite successful in bypassing the mainstream media up to a point, as they are both right-wing and basically are in bed together, but the NDP's strategy should not be one of fear of what the msp will say about their policies. The NDP's message is best delivered directly to the voters as much as possible. Perhaps the NDP should consider using some tactics that Harper has used, by focusing on local media more, who are usually more hungry for articles already written up for them.

NorthReport
josh

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau announced Wednesday that longtime MP Irwin Cotler will not be running in the next general election. Trudeau spoke to reporters following his party's weekly caucus meeting, and Cotler, who represents the same Montreal riding Pierre Trudeau once held, joined him.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberal-mp-irwin-cotler-not-running-in-next-election-1.2524206

NorthReport

Mount Royal Liberal support in last 5 general elections

2011 - 41%

2008 - 56%

2006 - 66%

2004 - 76%

2000 - 81%

 

NorthReport

I wonder if Trudeau's inappropriate comments about Ukraine will help to sideline the Liberals in their quest to become the government in 2015. 

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

NorthReport wrote:

I wonder if Trudeau's inappropriate comments about Ukraine will help to sideline the Liberals in their quest to become the government in 2015. 

No. Its sad, but true.

Brachina
Brachina

http://m.hilltimes.com/2014/03/10/expect-volatile-uncertain-2015-electio...

 

 More uncertainity for the 2015 election, its going to be rivating election.

 

 Nominations for the election are already opening up in all the parties, except the Bloc who still do not have even a leader. Maybe if Marios loses she'll seek tue job.

 Seriously though has anyone entered that race yet?

 

Brachina

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloc_Qu%C3%A9b%C3%A9cois_leadership_elect...

 

 The Bloc decides who will lead it by May, that's what a little over two months away and still no one is stepping up, a few propective candiates, but no one jumping into the ring. This has the excitement level of watching paint dry or grass ground.

 

 At this rate the interim leader will end up leader by default.

Matthieu

With the current election, I would expect a defeated PQ candidate to take up the spot.

Matthieu

With the current election, I would expect a defeated PQ candidate to take up the spot.

Brachina

 That seems like leaving things to the last minute.

bekayne

There's a Conservative brouhaha in Oakville North-Burlington:

http://theagenda.tvo.org/blog/agenda-blogs/brewing-controversy-conservat...

nicky
NorthReport

And the big federal winner last nite was Tom Mulcair.

For the first time since 1976, our Canada includes Quebec

Federally the immediate political beneficiary is New Democrat Leader Tom Mulcair, who no longer faces a wolf at the door in the form of divided loyalties among his soft-nationalist Quebec supporters. The diminution of the separatist threat also reduces one of the major obstacles to NDP progress in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and the West, namely the party’s Sherbrooke Declaration, espousing 50-per-cent-plus-one as adequate in a referendum to kick off negotiations on separation. That policy now becomes a vestigial limb.

For Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the result is also good news; he dodges the bullet that threatened to expose his government’s deep vulnerability in Quebec, where it holds just five seats. He can now work with an avowedly federalist premier who wants to solve problems and foster economic growth, rather than pick fights.

It seems Canadians are indeed devoted to their charter of values, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, meanwhile, is proven right in his bold contention last summer that Quebecers would ultimately reject the jingoism of Marois’ charter. Trudeau won plaudits then for his stance, in contrast with Mulcair’s more cautious approach (though he came out strongly against the values charter eventually) and Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s silence. Trudeau deserved those plaudits. The fact is though, that he has now de facto been deprived of a field, national unity crisis management, in which he and the federal Liberals had a clear competitive advantage. How they address this gap remains to be seen.


http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2014/04/08/michael-den-tandt-for-the...

Brachina

 The Liberal can no longer try and turn the ROC and Quebec against each other. National Unity will not be a major issue,if even an issue at all in 2015. 

 And this burns the Bloc even more which may shake some more votes lose for the NDP. Maybe even lead to the end of the bloc which will give the NDP even more votes.

Aristotleded24

To say nothing of the albatross Trudeau may have around his neck if Couillard becomes unpopular.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

The ties between provincial and federal politics are irrelevent in La Belle Province.

I doubt Trudeau is working up a sweat.

NorthReport

Federal leaders, parties dodged a bullet in Quebec election

For NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, Monday’s result is a rare political gift in that it comes with few strings attached.

The PQ defeat further reduces the likelihood of a Bloc resurgence in the large swaths of francophone Quebec that the New Democrats so recently conquered.

More importantly, from a national perspective it reinforces the NDP’s federalist flank against an anticipated Canada-wide Liberal offensive.

In preparation for a possible PQ victory on Monday, some Liberal strategists had already crafted attack lines to take Mulcair to task over the rules of a future referendum and his support of the threshold of a simple majority to set secession talks in motion.

Given the results of the election though it would be counterintuitive — for lack of a more polite word — for the Liberals to campaign hard on the modalities of a Quebec-Canada divorce.

If Justin Trudeau wants to put his party back on the francophone map in Quebec or get voters’ attention outside the province he will have to do so by means other than by wrapping himself in a Maple Leaf flag. Now that Quebec federalists are free to make their choice on a basis other than Canadian unity, most of them will choose which federal party to back in 2015 on a host of other policy merits.

But if he is to rise to the challenge of engaging Quebecers on other terms than those of a flags war Trudeau will have to overcome the one-trick-pony instincts of his advisers who seem unable to construe a Quebec campaign as anything other than a unity crusade.


http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/04/08/federal_leaders_parties_do...

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

Well, I finally had it explained to me why its the NDP's fault Harper got elected. Most Candians aren't Socialists and won't vote for us. So if we conitnue to insist on Socialism, we let Harper win. Therefore, its our fault. Simple, really. And no, I'm not making this up. I just had this said to me on the Huff Post.

onlinediscountanvils

Arthur Cramer wrote:
Well, I finally had it explained to me why its the NDP's fault Harper got elected. Most Candians aren't Socialists and won't vote for us. So if we conitnue to insist on Socialism, we let Harper win. Therefore, its our fault. Simple, really. And no, I'm not making this up. I just had this said to me on the Huff Post.

Just tell them that most dippers aren't socialist either.

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

onlinediscountanvils wrote:

Arthur Cramer wrote:
Well, I finally had it explained to me why its the NDP's fault Harper got elected. Most Candians aren't Socialists and won't vote for us. So if we conitnue to insist on Socialism, we let Harper win. Therefore, its our fault. Simple, really. And no, I'm not making this up. I just had this said to me on the Huff Post.

Just tell them that most dippers aren't socialist either.

Bqhatevwr

 

Krago

The BQ and PQ should hold a joint leadership convention.  The winner gets to lead the Official Opposition in the National Assembly, and the runner-up gets to sit next to Elizabeth May.

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