The federal election, started June 21st, 2015

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Pierre C yr

NorthReport wrote:

More good news for the NDP

NDP raised record $4.5 million in second quarter: campaign director

The NDP raised nearly $4.5 million in the second quarter, more than any other quarter in its history, according to new numbers released by the party.

In a video posted to Twitter on Thursday, NDP national campaign director Anne McGrath revealed the fundraising numbers one day ahead of Elections Canada’s quarterly financial reports for each federal party.

McGrath said the party raised $4,491,938 in the second quarter, compared to $2.2 million in the first quarter of 2015. She added that more than 48,000 people donated to the party this quarter, another record-breaking number for the party.

“Because of that extraordinary grassroots effort, we are closing the gap with Stephen Harper’s Conservatives. Today’s numbers prove that momentum for change is growing,” said McGrath in the one-minute video.


http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/ndp-raised-record-4-5-million-in-second-q...

 

We passed the liberals at about 4.2 million, libs and other parties went up a bit from the first quarter but NDP nearly doubled which is really a good indicator, but we are far behind the tories at nearly 7.4 million for the second quarter. And they had 6.3 million for our 2.2 million and the libs 4 million in the first quarter... The tories are raking it in...

 

http://www.elections.ca/WPAPPS/WPF/EN/PP/

 

We do win one number tho that of number of contributors. 48 000 vs 45 000 for the tories and ~32 000 for the libs...

 

 

socialdemocrati...

The polls show that fear isn't working in the election. Or, it isn't working as the parties want it to.

Fear is backfiring.

The Liberals didn't have much of a vision other than "get rid of Harper". They hurt the Conservatives more than they helped themselves.

So Harper blasted Trudeau over and over. The main beneficiaries were the NDP.

Same as when Harper smashed Ignatieff. The Conservatives edged up by a percent, and the NDP surged by double digits.

Meanwhile, positivity and cooperation are working.

Several weeks before the orange wave in Alberta and Bill C-51, Mulcair started edging up in the polls when he said nice things about a coalition.

And the Liberals have sunk even further as they've sworn off of a coalition.

Mulcair has learned to emphasize the positive when talking about the other parties. The Liberals and Conservatives have disappointed, and the NDP is offering something different.

Trudeau and Harper haven't learned that. They'll tell you Harper is a failure, and they'll tell you Trudeau isn't ready. But when it comes to their offer to Canadians, Trudeau and Harper are vague at best. 

The danger is that Trudeau's attacks on the NDP might backfire for Canada.

Trudeau is using what little leadership he has left to fight a coalition. And Liberal voters are listening. Whereas less than 20% of NDP voters don't want a Trudeau led coalition, nearly 1/3 of Liberal voters don't want a Mulcair led coalition.

Trudeau could have found the right words to at least open the door to a coalition with Mulcair. But Trudeau is more and more afraid that voters might see the NDP as legitimate, and he's trying to fight it. Yes, opening himself up to a coalition might send a message to Liberals that it's okay to vote NDP, but it might also impress voters with a spirit of pragmatism and optimism. It's the risky strategy that worked for Mulcair, and Jack Layton before him.

Negativity backfires. While Trudeau and Harper were attacking each other, the "anybody but Harper" voters went to the NDP.

If Trudeau switches from "stop Harper" to "stop the NDP" for the last few weeks of the campaign, those last few weeks might benefit Harper the most.

mark_alfred

Pierre C yr wrote:

We passed the liberals at about 4.2 million, libs and other parties went up a bit from the first quarter but NDP nearly doubled which is really a good indicator, but we are far behind the tories at nearly 7.4 million for the second quarter. And they had 6.3 million for our 2.2 million and the libs 4 million in the first quarter... The tories are raking it in...

 

http://www.elections.ca/WPAPPS/WPF/EN/PP/

 

We do win one number tho that of number of contributors. 48 000 vs 45 000 for the tories and ~32 000 for the libs...

 

That's great news.  It's the first time I've seen that the number of contributers for the NDP was greater than the number of contributers for the Cons (though total dollars are still less).  Still, this is good progress.

Brachina

 Mulcair is touring Northern New Brunswick.

Brachina

 Mulcair is touring Northern New Brunswick.

Brachina

 Mulcair is touring Northern New Brunswick.

Sean in Ottawa

Brachina wrote:

 Mulcair is touring Northern New Brunswick.

That is a good place to go right now.

socialdemocrati...

Money doesn't matter as much as it used to. The NDP made huge gains last election even trailing in the fundraising race. What's interesting, though, is the number of contributions, as a measure of engagement. 

Pondering

socialdemocraticmiddle wrote:

Money doesn't matter as much as it used to. The NDP made huge gains last election even trailing in the fundraising race. What's interesting, though, is the number of contributions, as a measure of engagement. 

Excellent observation. People who are at all interested in a party are going to go online for information. I go online for everything I want to know about. I can't imagine anyone who votes not checking online information. The heavy repetitive advertising the Cons do can be effective but only to a point. The sponsorship scandal, Dion, and Ignatieff were all gifts to Harper (and the NDP for that matter). The "not ready" mantra may have done its work so far but the campaign hasn't started yet. When people see Trudeau in action they will decide whether or not they think he is ready for themselves.

So, if you agree that he isn't ready, that he won't give a plausible performance, then his numbers will drop and it is in the bag for the NDP. If I'm right and he is ready, the game is on.

socialdemocrati...

His numbers already dropped off as Canadians saw his performance. But the broader point is well taken.

bekayne

http://www.canadianobituaries.com/mary-catherine-mccormick-finn-obituary...

In lieu of donations, Catherine would want you to do everything you can to drive Stephen Harper from office, right out of the country, and into the deep blue sea if possible.

Policywonk

NorthReport wrote:

Unfortunately that's how you win elections by staying on script.  Frown

Depends on the script.

NorthReport

Norman Spector ‏@nspector4  3h3 hours ago

Norman Spector retweeted Bob Mackin

Not your father's (or mother's) Ontario [as far back as Premier John Robarts in my recollection]

Norman Spector added,

Bob Mackin @bobmackin

From the "pebble-tossed from a glass cottage by a lake" file: Premier of high-tax, debt-laden province disses PM.

 

NorthReport

Trudeau's personal polling is very weak, the last poll was only 22% support, so it's very understandable.

The Cottage Coup


 

NorthReport
NorthReport

Stephen Harper: The making of a prime minister

 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/stephen-harper-the-making-o...

 

NorthReport
NorthReport

So it's official for October 19, 2015.

Two points:

1 - Dirty tricks will now go full throttle until October 20th.

2 - Don't restrict yourself to just one mainstream media's point of view. Use a variety of sources for your political news as the right-wing spin from both the Liberal media complex such as cbc, toronto star, huffington post, national newswatch,, as well as from the conservative media complex such as national post, postmedia, sun media, otherwise you may be really mislead about what is actually going on. 

 

 

NorthReport

What you will not hear from the CBC. 

Norman Spector ‏@nspector4  36m36 minutes ago

Mulcair doing a good job of defining himself as the alternative to Harper

3 retweets0 favoritesReply Retweet3 FavoriteMore

 

NorthReport

+

NorthReport

  1.  Pundits' Guide retweetedWarren Kinsella ‏@kinsellawarren  17h17 hours ago

    Aargh! When an opponent says you're not ready, you don't say: "No I'm not." You say: "You're corrupt." #lpc #cdnpoli http://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/politics/i-am-ready-trudeau-responds-to-tories-in-new-ad-1.2498202 …

 

NorthReport

Norman Spector ‏@nspector4  34m34 minutes ago  Laughing

By stiffing journos today, @ThomasMulcair showed he has the right stuff to be prime minister!

 

Sean in Ottawa

NorthReport wrote:

Norman Spector ‏@nspector4  34m34 minutes ago  Laughing

By stiffing journos today, @ThomasMulcair showed he has the right stuff to be prime minister!

 

That was sarcasm -- and honestly as a New Democrat I was not impressed.

Pierre C yr

Neither Mulcair nor Trudeau nor anyone else should give legitimacy to this early a call. 11 weeks is a joke and meant to both allow the overfunded by the business community tories to spend more and get more tax benefits from canadians over it and starve the other parties. There will be ample other times to answer questions to media. Not every presentation to the media is meant to be a Q&A.

I was really hoping this was only a rumor but now electoral reform is a top 10 item for a post Harper regime. 

 

 

DLivings

Pierre C yr wrote:

Neither Mulcair nor Trudeau nor anyone else should give legitimacy to this early a call. 11 weeks is a joke and meant to both allow the overfunded by the business community tories to spend more and get more tax benefits from canadians over it and starve the other parties. There will be ample other times to answer questions to media. Not every presentation to the media is meant to be a Q&A.

I was really hoping this was only a rumor but now electoral reform is a top 10 item for a post Harper regime. 

Well stated Pierre

Sean in Ottawa

Pierre C yr wrote:

Neither Mulcair nor Trudeau nor anyone else should give legitimacy to this early a call. 11 weeks is a joke and meant to both allow the overfunded by the business community tories to spend more and get more tax benefits from canadians over it and starve the other parties. There will be ample other times to answer questions to media. Not every presentation to the media is meant to be a Q&A.

I was really hoping this was only a rumor but now electoral reform is a top 10 item for a post Harper regime. 

 

 

If that is the point it is being poorly communicated.

If that is the point the NDP should say so -- and then what -- boycott the first few weeks of the campaign? Makes no sense. The NDP should answer the questions and use them to raise the legitimacy and or fairness of this early call.

David Young

Don't you love the line from Harper that this election won't cost taxpayers anything extra.

Oh, really?

Given the fact that the Returning Officers will have to set up their offices and hire staff during the month of August instead of waiting until September. that additional one-month expense of Returning Offices and staff will cost millions more!

That fact alone should be stated to every Conservative candidate from now until voting day!

 

NorthReport

Nick Kouvalis ‏@NickKouvalis  5h5 hours ago

LPC & @JustinTrudeau will receive less than Iggy did, < 19%. CPC vs NDP = CPC with big minority or slim majority #topoli #onpoli #cdnpoli

 

Jacob Two-Two

I agree that Justin will come out with less than Iggy. What Harper and supporters can't comprehend is that CPC vs. NDP = NDP majority. They have never understood this country, or what circumstances have led to them running it for the past decade.

Pondering

I think the debate in four days is going to be quite the eye-opener.

Pierre C yr

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Pierre C yr wrote:

Neither Mulcair nor Trudeau nor anyone else should give legitimacy to this early a call. 11 weeks is a joke and meant to both allow the overfunded by the business community tories to spend more and get more tax benefits from canadians over it and starve the other parties. There will be ample other times to answer questions to media. Not every presentation to the media is meant to be a Q&A.

I was really hoping this was only a rumor but now electoral reform is a top 10 item for a post Harper regime. 

 

 

If that is the point it is being poorly communicated.

If that is the point the NDP should say so -- and then what -- boycott the first few weeks of the campaign? Makes no sense. The NDP should answer the questions and use them to raise the legitimacy and or fairness of this early call.

I think for a start and theres no point in giving media all its answers this early in the campaign when summer is going to keep eyeballs away from the boob tube and other media outlets. Thats another problem an overlong campaign will give as challenge to underfunded parties and the media who give free access but would obviously rather you pay for it. How to keep them and the public interested in listening long after the campaign has started and long before its over.

But not every obvious thing needs to be pointed out. The opposition parties not giving in to Harper's manipulations are basically telling canadians who are watching what many of them think. This is too needlessly early and much more expensive to the taxpayers and in the middle of summer when many arent paying attention. Both most in the media and in the public know the Harper electoral 'reform' was anything but.

Brachina

 It could be Pondering, the stakes are high for everyone and I suspect all of them have been preparing.

 Mulcair- He's been leading in the polls now which means a pile up. He has formible skills in a debate, but he does occasionally make mistakes, he can't offord to be arrogent just because he has the most skills, if one is not careful a weaker oppentent can land a lucky blow.

 Harper- He has to reassert his dominance and defend himself on the poor economic record and antidemocractic actions, if he's not careful he'll look like an even bigger asshole.

 Trudeau- Has to find the right chink in Mulcair's armour and if he thinks its over national unity, he'll find it blowing up in his face.

 May- This could be her only chance to debate the other leaders, so this glorified independant better make the most of it.

Brachina

 Bad news for Trudeau, our lady of.the hydro privatization, Premier Kathleen Wynne has promised to campaign for him, that should cost him 5 to 10% of his vote in Ontario alone. :-) 

bekayne

NorthReport wrote:

Nick Kouvalis ‏@NickKouvalis  5h5 hours ago

LPC & @JustinTrudeau will receive less than Iggy did, < 19%. CPC vs NDP = CPC with big minority or slim majority #topoli #onpoli #cdnpoli

 

Nick Kouvalis ‏@NickKouvalis  3h3 hours agoEssex, Ontario

Watching PM Harper in Montreal. He's on his game and he's gonna whoop Trudeau & Mulcair.

 

Pondering

Brachina wrote:

 It could be Pondering, the stakes are high for everyone and I suspect all of them have been preparing.

 Mulcair- He's been leading in the polls now which means a pile up. He has formible skills in a debate, but he does occasionally make mistakes, he can't offord to be arrogent just because he has the most skills, if one is not careful a weaker oppentent can land a lucky blow.

 Harper- He has to reassert his dominance and defend himself on the poor economic record and antidemocractic actions, if he's not careful he'll look like an even bigger asshole.

 Trudeau- Has to find the right chink in Mulcair's armour and if he thinks its over national unity, he'll find it blowing up in his face.

 May- This could be her only chance to debate the other leaders, so this glorified independant better make the most of it.

Good analysis except for Trudeau. Trudeau's primary task is to present himself as a credible Prime Minister. In other words, he has to appear ready. He can't just give canned lines. He needs to show himself as informed and articulate on all topics. He doesn't have to win the debate but he has to prove he is a contender.

NorthReport

-

NorthReport

If you rely totally on the Liberal media complex (Nat News watch, cbc, toronto star, huffington post, abacus data ,EKOS, Forum, etc.), you probably won't know what's actually taking place, and will be quite surprised when you hear the results on the nite of October 19.

 

NorthReport

If you rely totally on the Liberal media complex (Nat News watch, cbc, toronto star, huffington post, abacus data, EKOS, Forum, etc.), you probably won't know what's actually taking place, and will be quite surprised when you hear the results on the nite of October 19.

 

takeitslowly

Mulcair acting out of touch these past few days. Very disappointed with him for acting like Harper.

takeitslowly

Mulcair acting out of touch these past few days. Very disappointed with him for acting like Harper.

NorthReport

How the NDP hopes to convince Canadians it’s their time

The NDP is heading into this election with their most credible shot at forming government yet, but to win they need to sustain that momentum through an 11-week campaign.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2015/08/02/how-the-ndp-hopes-to-convi...

NorthReport

Norman Spector ‏@nspector4  12h12 hours ago  Laughing

Norman Spector retweeted Omar Sachedina

Momentous!

Norman Spector added,

Omar Sachedina @omarsachedinaTeam Trudeau says @JustinTrudeau has now landed in #YVR.

 

NorthReport
  1. 132 retweets196 favoritesReply Retweet132 Favorite196More
  2.  Nick Kouvalis retweetedManny Montenegrino ‏@manny_ottawa  6h6 hours ago

    Most election campaigns. 37 days. 

  3. Paul Martin 2005/6 64 days

  4.  @pmharper 2015 77 days 

  5. But NOW Media is outraged about the cost.#Tiresome

 

NorthReport

 Norman Spector retweetedDavid Akin ‏@davidakin  13h13 hours ago

David Akin retweeted CBC News Alerts

Voters don’t care how many questions reporters get to ask. Harper’s been proving that point for a decade.

David Akin added,

CBC News Alerts @CBCAlertsAfter his opening speech in federal election campaign, #NDP's #TomMulcair takes no questions from reporters. http://cbc.ca/1.3175136  #elxn42

 

 

NorthReport

Help to fund rabble as you just can't get much of this kind of excellent, and I mean thoroughly professional reporting, anywhere in the mainstream press.

 

The campaign has started and all parties have records to defend

The election campaign is officially on, and, as NDP and Official Opposition leader Tom Mulcair predicted more than a year ago, it is a three-way race.

Of course, back when Mulcair was saying that, the polls had Justin Trudeau's Liberals in the lead and the NDP in third place. 

The poll-obsessed media tilted their coverage in response to those numbers.

More often than not, they treated the duly elected Official Opposition as the third party and the third party as the government in waiting.

Then came the Alberta election and the Conservatives' anti-terror legislation, Bill C-51, for which the Liberals voted in favour while promising to fix it later, and public opinion seemed to shift.

When many polls showed that Mulcair might be the more popular choice to unseat Harper, the media started to pay attention.

Now, the pundits said almost with one voice, there must be "increased scrutiny" of the party that had been the Official Opposition for more than three years. 

NDP leader Mulcair and his 95 colleagues had been busy doing their job all along, in plain sight. Since 2011, they had been persistently and diligently pushing back on the Harper government's often radical agenda.

That agenda included bloated budget omnibus bills that, among other outrages, dramatically reduced the federal government's role in environmental protection; an attack on Canadians' right to vote, which Harper's minister Pierre Poilievre oxymoronically called the Fair Elections Act; and another omnibus bill that shoved mandatory minimum sentences down the provinces' throats, while turning possession of small amounts of marijuana into the major crime of drug trafficking.

Official Opposition worked hard out of the limelight

Consistently, Official Opposition MPs, and, at times, their third party Liberal colleagues, pushed for realistic and reasonable changes to Conservative legislation which was too often more motivated by ideology -- and in some cases, such as that of Fair Elections Act, sheer nastiness -- than evidence.

The NDP did it in the House, in little-watched debates and in Question Period, and in committees, which is where the heavy lifting of parliamentary work should happen.

But Harper and his Conservatives did not interpret their 2011 majority win, however narrow, as an opportunity to consult or engage in dialogue with the opposition.

Despite their efforts to fulfill their constitutional role and constructively propose improvements to flawed measures before Parliament, NDPers faced a brick wall in the Harper government.

You might nonetheless expect that the Official Opposition would have gotten at least some good marks for trying so hard.

That did not happen.

All of the opposition's brave, if ultimately futile efforts barely grazed the consciousness of the folks who decide what gets covered in the media.

Then came the Duffy affair, on which the prime minister had to face direct questions from the opposition. When NDP leader Tom Mulcair showed himself to be a skilled prosecutor, at once fierce and coldly logical, the media did, at least for a moment, take notice.

But the smart money still had it that Mulcair's well-aimed, rapier-like probes at the prime minister were only paving the way for the young and charming heir apparent, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau.

The third party leader may have sometimes sounded like a cross between a high school debater and Mrs. Malaprop, with a touch of the unctuous Polonius thrown in for good measure -- no matter. He had what much of the Ottawa establishment of lobbyists, pundits and other influence peddlers considered to be the magic touch -- that ephemeral attribute we call star quality.

Mulcair might soften up the ruling prime minister, they reasoned, but Trudeau would reap the reward.

Looking for flaws in the NDP

The establishment is now, belatedly, turning its spotlight on Mulcair and his party, and they are picking away, looking for what they do not like.

There is, for instance, what some describe as the NDP's historic ambivalence toward trade deals. 

Or, there is the fact that Mulcair is supposedly ready to break up Canada on the "strength of one vote." That is the same Mulcair Quebec separatists excoriate for having worked for the Anglo rights organization Alliance Quebec, and the same Mulcair who lost a Quebec MP to the Bloc because that MP thought the NDP's policy on a separation referendum was too tough.  

Some commentators have even gone ad hominem. They cluck about the preparedness of the current Official Opposition to assume the reins of federal power.

One of the recurring tropes of smart-set Ottawa cocktail chatter is that while Trudeau may be less qualified to be prime minister than Mulcair, he has the better team of advisers.

Some pundits have parroted the Liberal leader and claimed that, unlike Trudeau, Mulcair has no obvious Bay Street-approved candidate for finance minister standing in the wings.

That's what passes for scrutiny in today's Ottawa -- or is it, at heart, mostly humbug?

Let's just take the last point. It plays into Prime Minister Harper's narrative that, while the Liberal leader cannot be trusted with power, in the New Democrats' case, it is the entire party that cannot be trusted. 

There is a widespread myth -- to which much of the mainstream Canadian media seems to subscribe -- that to be a government's point person on economic policy you must come from the financial industry.

In the United States, the treasury secretary, equivalent to the Canadian finance minister, very often does come from Wall Street. 

Robert Rubin and Henry Paulson who served presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are classic cases. They both cut their teeth at the mega investment banking house Goldman Sachs. 

The policies they espoused included exempting those toxic financial products called credit 

derivatives from regulation, and dropping the sane rule that enforced a separation of investment from retail banking. Those policies led, in part, to the crash of 2008. Worse, they exacerbated its disastrous effects. 

The recurring mantra of those denizens of Wall Street was, like that of Voltair's Dr. Pangloss: "All is for the best in this best of all possible worlds."

As the financial crisis was unfolding in 2007, Paulson famously adopted a strategy of deny, deny, deny. 

The American banking system is sound, Bush's chief economics guy said, a little more than a year before Lehman Brothers folded and the American government was forced to inject billions of taxpayers' dollars into the system to head off total collapse.

Joe Oliver, Harper's current finance minister, also comes from investment banking; but he is a rarity here. Most Canadian finance ministers have been, like Oliver's predecessor, Jim Flaherty, politicians like any other, without formal, notionally economic credentials. 

The jury's still out on Oliver -- who has spent a lot of his time avoiding having to answer questions on the economy, whether from journalists or MPs -- but the record of Wall Street treasury secretaries south of the border is not stellar. 

Yet Canadian pundits insist on harshly judging the capacity of an opposition party to govern because it lacks magical Bay Street credentials. That judgement says more about the pundits' servility to Big Money and ignorance of recent history than it does about the current Official Opposition party's readiness to govern.

Parties' performances since 2011 should matter

In any case, the battle is now fully joined.

Canadians will have to choose a new Parliament on election day. They may also be choosing a new government. 

The campaign to come will matter. We will be watching and evaluating the performances of the leaders. 

At the same time, as the campaign gets underway, it might be useful to cast one's mind back to what has happened in Parliament since 2011.  

The Harper government has its record, and it would be tragic if it were allowed to run away from it.

Harper and his team backed out of the Kyoto Accord on climate change.

They drastically reduced corporate taxes with no positive effect on investment.

The Conservatives pushed back against regulations for the oil and gas sector, while presiding over a significant decline in manufacturing.

They demonized refugees and they attacked independent officers of Parliament -- and much more.

But the opposition parties also have their records.

They, too, have been in parliament all this time, even if the media were not always looking.

How the parties that aspire to replace the Conservatives played their roles in opposition are also factors voters should consider when they weigh their choices.

 

 

 

 

 


http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/karl-nerenberg/2015/08/campaign-has-star...

NorthReport

On end goals

In sum, if there is a reason for the Liberal Party to exist other than inertia, that reason should offer a justification to work with others - as well as the promise of building the party in the future through the accomplishments achieved under the coalition. We should then expect the Liberals to be able to articulate what they'd want to pursue (under a coalition or otherwise) if they do end up as the third party in a minority Parliament - and to be willing to work with the NDP and others to get it done.

On the other hand, if the Liberal Party is so confused about its own reasons for existence as to have no idea what values or policies are important enough to make cooperation worthwhile, then it's hard to see what Canadian voters could possibly have to gain by keeping it around. And so the more the Libs whine that they'd be doomed if they tried to work with anybody, the harder it is to escape the conclusion that they're broken beyond repair either way.

http://accidentaldeliberations.blogspot.ca/2015/08/on-end-goals.html

JKR

NorthReport wrote:

  1. 132 retweets196 favoritesReply Retweet132 Favorite196More
  2.  Nick Kouvalis retweeted Manny Montenegrino ‏@manny_ottawa  6h6 hours ago

    Most election campaigns. 37 days. 

  3. Paul Martin 2005/6 64 days

  4.  @pmharper 2015 77 days 

  5. But NOW Media is outraged about the cost.#Tiresome

 

The 2005/06 election took place over the Christmas/New Year holidays because of the non-confidence vote. There were only 21 days of election time after the holiday break. A Christmas election is thankfully not the norm.

This 3 month long election is a travesty to our democracy. All our fixed-date election rules are built around there being a 37 day election. This absurd 3 month long election is happening because the Conservatives want to take advantage of their superior financial position even if it costs Canadians hundreds of millions. Once again Harper is bending and breaking as many rules as possible in order to hold onto power.

NorthReport

Did Martin ask the GG for a 66 day election or not?

Answer: Yes he did. So what if it was Christmas.

We are in the summer holiday period now, and it is 77 days, or 11 days longer.

Nothing to see there.

To win the election the NDP needs to focus on the big picture, primarily jobs, the economy and climate change.

All this gnashing of teeth about minor non-issues such as length of campaign, the debates, etc., in the scheme of things, emanating primarily from the Liberal medai complex, will not defeat Harper.

 

JKR

NorthReport wrote:

All this gnashing of teeth about minor non-issues such as length of campaign, the debates, etc., in the scheme of things, emanating primarily from the Liberal medai complex, will not defeat Harper.

Then why did you bring up the issue of the length of the campaign in your post?

NorthReport

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