Police officer shot to death in northern Quebec

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Mikal Sergov
Police officer shot to death in northern Quebec

A police officer with a regional force was shot and killed after responding to a domestic dispute in northern Quebec.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/police-officer-shot-to-deat...

 

Police fear domestic disputes more than any type of call for assistance.

Slumberjack

Mikal Sergov wrote:
 Police fear domestic disputes more than any type of call for assistance.

It's more of a healthy respect for predictable situations.

lagatta

Well, it is well known that there are a lot of social and family problems in Nunavik. Moreover, there are a lot of guns, owned for legitimate reasons (hunting).

Very sad of course for the police officer. Though we must remember all other workers killed on the job as well.

By the way, the Globe is behind a paywall. Here is CBC coverage on the story:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2013/03/03/montreal-kuujjua...

 

 

Slumberjack

There's a ton of them everywhere in the courts.  And guns too.  Your second sentence is interesting too because there was a debate here about the police as workers, a largely unresolved one if I recall, except that we were encouraged against using the word pig in thread titles about the police for that very reason.

lagatta

Police definitely have a role in upholding the capitalist status quo, and in particular in playing a part in repressing workers' strikes and pickets. I don't think this is the appropriate thread to discuss that though, when obviously this officer (who was very likely an Inuk as well) was killed doing nothing of the kind. There is still a standoff, according to the CBC article, which can mean that family members are in danger or may have even been injured or killed.

My point was more that the police hold huge, mediatised public funerals for their own, and other people killed on the job rarely attract such media attention. Several occupations have higher death rates than the police.

Unionist

I don't care much for police, primarily because of the role they're forced to play in our system, as lagatta described.

But when it comes to "domestic disputes" (what a euphemism), I'm relieved if the police show up in time to help the victim(s). And I grieve if they are hurt or killed in performing that service.

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Slumberjack wrote:

Mikal Sergov wrote:
 Police fear domestic disputes more than any type of call for assistance.

It's more of a healthy respect for predictable situations.

The stats say they should fear robbery calls more. I wonder why we never have large funerals for taxi drivers.

Quote:

Policing, by its very nature, is a high-risk occupation. One of the dangers associated with being a police officer1 in Canada is homicide. The only other profession more at risk of on-the-job homicide is that of taxi drivers with a rate about twice that of police officers.2

...

There are some situations faced by police officers in which the risk of being murdered is higher than others. For example, since 1961, police officers were most often murdered during a robbery investigation, accounting for nearly one-quarter (23%) of all killings (Chart 2). Another 14% of police officers were murdered while responding to a domestic dispute, although most of these homicides occurred during the 1960s and 1970s. In more recent years, stopping a suspicious vehicle/person and stopping a vehicle for a traffic violation have resulted in more homicides against police officers than responding to domestic disputes.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2010003/article/11354-eng.htm

 

Unionist

Update:

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2013/03/03/montreal-kuujjua... of man found in home where police officer was killed[/url]

 

Slumberjack

Unionist wrote:
I don't care much for police, primarily because of the role they're forced to play in our system, as lagatta described.

But when it comes to "domestic disputes" (what a euphemism), I'm relieved if the police show up in time to help the victim(s). And I grieve if they are hurt or killed in performing that service. 

There appears to be no shortage of individual police persons willing to go above and beyond the call without even being asked, specifically when it comes to exemplifying the worst excesses of the institutions they represent, but mostly when we talk about police it is about institutions.

Slumberjack

kropotkin1951 wrote:
The stats say they should fear robbery calls more. I wonder why we never have large funerals for taxi drivers.

Regarding public police funerals, it's because we are in need of constant reminder as to who our heroes should be, and the sacrifice it takes to maintain a system such as ours, and we also require our periods of rage against any and all who represent a threat to corporate society as it exists.

Mikal Sergov

Funeral is in Ottawa today. Since that's where I work I'll be there and post pictures afterwords.

 

Hundreds expected for Ottawa funeral of slain northern officer Killed in the line of duty on March 2

As many as 700 police officers from across the country are expected to be in Ottawa Saturday for the funeral of an officer shot and killed shot and killed in northern Quebec last weekend.

Steve Déry, a 27-year-old Kativik Regional Police Force officer, was shot and killed on March 2 while responding to a domestic dispute in Kujjuuaq in northern Quebec.

A second officer, Joshua Boreland, was wounded but is expected to recover.

After the shooting Quebec provincial police were called in to help with the 17-hour standoff.

A woman managed to escape the house during the stand-off. Later, police fired a flare into the house before members of the tactical squad moved in. They found the lifeless body of the alleged shooter, Jobie Saunders Jr., 21.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2013/03/08/ottawa-funeral-ste...

 

(This is a personal opinion, but I never understood the reluctance of some to mourn the police when they're killed on the job. We can rightly condemn those who break the law, we should be able to applaud those who protect us. I'm thinking specifically of the Ottawa police who rescued three abandoned girls from an apartment earlier this week. It just seems to me that the police do far more acts of valour than not.)

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Yes the police will be there in full patch regalia reminding us all that they are special and better than other workers, after all they enforce the law for our 0.1%.  Union picket line? Call in the police. Native blockade?  Call in the police?  Peace march? Call in the police? On good days they arrive and only disperse people and on other days we get a Dudley George.

Paladin1

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Yes the police will be there in full patch regalia reminding us all that they are special and better than other workers, after all they enforce the law for our 0.1%.  Union picket line? Call in the police. Native blockade?  Call in the police?  Peace march? Call in the police? On good days they arrive and only disperse people and on other days we get a Dudley George.

 

Uh huh

Arrive and disperse people except when gunmen shoot at THEM allowing their female hostage to escape.

 

Unionist

OathofStone wrote:

Arrive and disperse people except when gunmen shoot at THEM allowing their female hostage to escape.

 

Those would be, like, the non-law-abiding firearm owners, right?

Are we really descending into a debate as to whether the police in Canada are a force for good or for evil?

I thought not using animal names in thread titles was an adequate compromise.

As for police killed on the job while performing a public service (as opposed to attacking workers or Indigenous people or youth etc.), I repeat that their loss deserves to be mourned and recognized.

It does not, however, merit an obscene lavish monstrous display of military might, at taxpayers' expense. It deserves absolutely no less or more than the injury or death on the job of any worker. As I have noted before somewhere in these pages, I had to take time off without pay many years ago to attend the funeral of a co-worker killed on the job. And no, I wasn't offered free transportation, hotel, and per diem to travel to Ottawa or wherever for a state funeral.

Anyone who thinks that huge sums of taxpayers' money and huge lavish displays are organized out of actual concern for police officers, is welcome to bid on some swampland here. It is to buy the ongoing loyalty of the surviving police to the ruling class, with our money. Kind of multiplies the obscenity factor, doesn't it?

 

Paladin1

Unionist wrote:

OathofStone wrote:

Arrive and disperse people except when gunmen shoot at THEM allowing their female hostage to escape.

 

Those would be, like, the non-law-abiding firearm owners, right?

I have no idea what you're insinuating here but i guess so?  This shooting took place away from a city so your no guns in cities idea would not have helped.

Quote:

Are we really descending into a debate as to whether the police in Canada are a force for good or for evil?

It looks that way. That and complaining over the public funeral (where does funding for that come from anyways?)

I'm guessing everytime a police officer is killed and someone posts about it here it turns into a debate about their funeral and examples of bad cops?

Unionist

Full disclosure:

It's a weakness of mine - and I'm working on it - but I have difficulty debating on a progressive board with people who spend 90% of their time defending gun ownership and the police.

My bad.

 

6079_Smith_W

Unionist wrote:

It does not, however, merit an obscene lavish monstrous display of military might, at taxpayers' expense.

I agree completely.

Not sure how this thread got on that tangent. Comparing it to other people getting killed doing dangerous work is valid, since it is tragic in all cases. As for the big show afterward, doesn't matter too much to the dead person, as far as I can see.

Unionist

6079_Smith_W wrote:

 

Not sure how this thread got on that tangent.

I think the problem originated with the opening of this thread. It may be inexperience on the poster's part. But why open a thread on a single, isolated, sad event, unless it's to discuss general aspects that may interest progressive people? And one aspect is the glorification of the military and the police by the state, and the diminishment of ordinary working folks. So that's the tangent we ended up on.

 

Stargazer

Out of curiosity, is there a particular reason police deaths need a special thread on a progressive forum?

6079_Smith_W

True enough. Though as I said I don't think it has makes too much difference to the dead person. And I doubt anyone goes to work hoping to get a big fancy funeral out of the deal.

What came to my mind was, as was stated, the unpredictable nature of domestic calls of all kinds. And in particular how those violent situations can go sideways. A neighbour of ours who had an abusive partner wound up having the cops called on her by him because she happened to slam a door. Because of the nature of the law, she got arrested, had to leave the house, not him.

 

Stargazer

I think a more fitting thread would be one which pointed out the brutality and abuse the police hand out to citizens. An officer is not worth more than any other citizen and we don't need endless newspaper articles and threads that attempt to make this death somehow worse than all the other deaths.

 

Maybe we can talk about all the dead FN women the police don't care about, or the FN kids that are being taken out at night by police to be abandoned and left for dead in the freezing cold. Or the many men and women beaten and abused for simply not being white or for being poor.

 

This is a left wing forum. It should stay that way

Paladin1

Unionist wrote:

6079_Smith_W wrote:

 

Not sure how this thread got on that tangent.

I think the problem originated with the opening of this thread. It may be inexperience on the poster's part. But why open a thread on a single, isolated, sad event, unless it's to discuss general aspects that may interest progressive people? And one aspect is the glorification of the military and the police by the state, and the diminishment of ordinary working folks. So that's the tangent we ended up on.

 

You're right Unionist.   Not relevant to the thread but I don't think police or military should get public funerals.

Reading this story got me thinking about the perdictiment women in remote places like this might be in where their partners confine them against their will and how far off help can be.

Slumberjack

Stargazer wrote:
This is a left wing forum. It should stay that way.

Hi Stargazer!

Unionist

STARGAZER!!!

So happy to see you!!

 

6079_Smith_W

@ Stargazer #20

I think those would all be good directions this discussion could go. And as I said, I agree with you on funeral issue.

I guess the only reason I mentioned it is that there have been couple of threads on this general topic which have gone to the default of the funeral as propaganda issue.

Again, not saying I disagree, but I think any of the safety or violence issues that have been raised would seem to be a bit more important and relevant to me. As for this tragic incident; I think Unionist set the right balance.

And sure. I agree the whole raising of this spot news piece can be put down to a new poster.

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavik_mp_honours_cs... MP honours Cst. Steve Dery in the House of Commons[/url]