ruefrontenac.com

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duncan cameron
ruefrontenac.com

 

ruefrontenac.com the wonderful site set up in response to the Journal de Montréall lock-out has folded because it could not find financing. It had a problem of accumulated debt. We at rabble.ca hate to see the loss of an alternative site started by journalists, and loved by its readers. 

R.I.P. ruefrontenac.com

Meanwhile the Journal de Montéal is back, a publication of Quebecor, owner of Sun Media. Not a great trade-off. Corporate media can be defeated by reader boycotts, and by a willingness to fund alternative sites. It is disappointing to see that ruefrontenac.com could not survive on reader support.

Rest assured rabble.ca has no debt, and we are going to flourish. I want it to be because we gain more reader support, and not because our employees continue to donate time as volunteers. Please excuse the candour.

 

Unionist

Thanks for the tribute to Rue Frontenac, duncan - and the look toward the future for rabble.

planteater

According to a Le Devoir article on July 2 it isn't the lack of funding that killed the site. Apparently the new owner and the writers couldn't come to an agreement. It is unclear what the topics of contention between the writers and the owner were 

 

Whatever the reasons may have been, the loss of one of the few French language alternative news sites is saddening. The Journal de Montréal is not really very much like Sun Media however. Even by Quebec standards it can't really be called anything but left of centre or at least that has always been my impression of the paper. 

duncan cameron

planteater it was my understanding that the lack of readership support forced the journalists to seek an outside buyer, then negotiations failed.

Unionist

duncan cameron wrote:
planteater it was my understanding that the lack of readership support forced the journalists to seek an outside buyer, then negotiations failed.

I don't believe readership support was the problem at all - both the website and the new print edition enjoyed lots of attention. The problem was financing, once the CSN pulled their support after the deal was signed and the lockout was over.

Here's Joëlle Pouliot's take on what happened - from what I hear, it's pretty close to accurate:

[url=http://www.montrealgazette.com/Future+Frontenac+doubt/5069638/story.html... of Rue Frontenac in doubt[/url]

 

 

duncan cameron

By readership support I mean dollars, not number of unique visitors Unionist. Their readership was high, 500,000 monthly visitors. But the budget was $30 million, and without converting readers into paying customers at high levels, the project was doomed, despite the readership numbers. Le Devoir is asking something over $20 per month for full access to their site. I have no idea how many people pay, but their print circulation is only 30,000 or so. Nobody in Canada has figured out how to get readers to pay for journalistic web content without having a tie in to an outside body, like a newspaper. If the Journal de Montréal had wanted, they could have come to terms with the operation, but I am sure they didn't know how to make it turn a profit.