Student Strike #10: aux 100 prochains jours

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lagatta

I'd just love it if the protestors could call a halt to the bloody FI Grand Pricks and Bernie Ecclestone's extortion.

Last year, some environmentalists and sympathizers of the S-L-O-W movement (slow food, slow travel, etc) held a small, pleasant demo in Parc Lafontaine, where one can hear the vroumm-vroumm of the race, over and over and over.

I just hope we can get out a more significant protest this year. There have been anti-Grand-Prix protests in several countries where it is run.

Of course restauranteurs and hoteliers won't be happy - there are many, many other reasons tourists come to Montréal in the summer, but alas your usual cultural or even gastronomic-inclined tourist doesn't spend as much as those high rollers, who are blowing pots of money to show off.

As for electoral organising, there are two fairly new parties, Québec solidaire if you want to turn left; the CAQ if you think Charest should be more hardline. I've been a QS member since its founding. But politics does not stop or start at the ballot box, it also involves protests and other forms of citizen action.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

lagatta wrote:
I'd just love it if the protestors could call a halt to the bloody FI Grand Pricks and Bernie Ecclestone's extortion. 

NDPP

May 23: Police Attack CUTV's Journalists and Kettle Protesters (and vid)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwFE6WUzcfo&feature=player_embedded

as always people's alternative media standing strong and free and with the people

www.cutvmontreal.ca/live

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Kaith Marouf of CUTV is giving an interview on CBC saying how the people were treated once they were kettled - very shocking behaviour from the Quebec riot cops.

6079_Smith_W

love is free wrote:

contrast an opinion piece like this with anything in any english canadian daily.  here's the google translation.

I take it you have read Barbara Kay's latest piece in the National Post. As racist as it is, at least she implies that Charest is partly to blame, since he is caretaker of what she calls the "nanny state".

 

 

NDPP

The Maple Spring in Quebec (MP3)  - Yves Engler and Brendan Stone

http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/audio/maple-spring-quebec/11019

"500,000 Students and citizens march in Montreal to protest the dictatorship of the bean-counters. Yves Engler gives us a report.."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Red Square Revolt – Quebec Students on Strike

A film by Nate Lavey

Nate was visiting Montreal last weekend and made this amazing documentary. It does a great job explaining the history and evolution of the student movement.

http://vimeo.com/42702955


Leigh

Police assaulting ought to be arrested, including the one/s caught acting as provocateurs.

Kettling, reported on CBC pm news, illegally contravenes civil rights.

C. Majka in an article at rabble today says education could be paid for instead of fighter jets, which is true.

It's also true though that the Harper government can, and ought to, create money for post-secondary education, other public services, job creation (without undermining workers' EI, paid for by workers), using its Constitutional powers to spend, account deficits, and do so without borrowing if the electorate chooses (W.Black, 'Why Does Uncle Sam Borrow?' New Economic perspectives).

Canada has similar powers- National Farmers' Union, The Union Farmer Quarterly Winter 2011 Vol.17, p.15 ):

"Canada's Constitutional Supreme Law orders our Federal Government to create this country's entire money supply and spend it into circulation - debt and interest-free."

This quote paints a different picture than a statement in an otherwise very good article (especially regarding direct democracy) linked from Maysie's post in the Student Strike 9 thread http://montreal.mediacoop.ca/story/ten-points-everyone-should-know-about... :

"The authors of the report from the Institut de recherche et d’informations socio-economique explained that, “Since governments underwrite those loans, if students default it could be catastrophic for public finances,” and that, “If the bubble explodes, it could be just like the mortgage crisis.

Governments, unlike Greece, which create their own fiat currency as Canada does, can create as much currency as is needed for public services, jobs, environment, etc.  They simply type it in. (www.neweconomicperspectives.org, MMTP). (The ECB has this power and ought to use it instead of dismantling social programs/jobs/human rights in member countries, for additional profits of creditors.)

If students default it wouldn't be 'catastrophic' for public finances, and if the bubble explodes, it might be like the mortgage crisis and government would type up the money for the creditors, and on we would go, like we did last time, like we do every time.

The problem, though, is what happens to the people who've lost their homes, and students - do they have to stop going to school?

So really governments with the power to create currency ought to use their power, without debt and interest-free, to fund public education directly, provide homes for those who lost them, along with other services necessary to uphold our human rights, green public energy, and clean up of the Earth.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

N.S. students back Quebec peers

King’s College group says it shares opposition to costs

A Nova Scotia university student union is doing its part to show support for striking peers in Quebec.

“While students in Quebec may be facing different circumstances than those in Nova Scotia we share the same fight against cuts to our social services and an increasingly underfunded education system,” King’s student union officials said in a letter to the striking students.

“Your student movement has served as a source of inspiration for us here in Nova Scotia and we respect your memberships’ decision to stay on strike as a necessary step in fighting the ever-increasing price of an education.”....

http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/99568-ns-students-back-quebec-peers

........................

Stop the tuition hikes: Filipino Canadian youth stand in solidarity with Quebec student strike

National statement
May 24, 2012

Toronto, ON—With the Quebec student strike now into its third month, Ugnayan ng Kabataang Pilipino Sa Canada/Filipino Canadian Youth Alliance—National (UKPC/FCYA) stand in solidarity with the student movement in Quebec and beyond by calling for an end to the ongoing assault against our access to education and to reject the tuition hikes and cuts against university education proposed by Quebec’s Liberal Party. For many youth across Canada today, alongside the over 200,000 strong who have mobilized in Quebec, the greatest disruption to our lives are not the wave of public protests and strikes that have sprung up throughout streets nationwide, but instead is the onslaught of the neoliberal agenda that denies us our entitlement to universally accessible public education and the basic right to determine our futures and to fully participate in Canadian society......

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Media Advisory - Students, staff and allies to oppose Québec's Law 78 and outline plan for solidarity actions to oppose Ontario tuition fees

TORONTO, May 24, 2012 /CNW/ - A press conference will be held tomorrow morning to announce the outcome of a mass assembly to build a movement of solidarity with Québec students who are on strike. The Student Solidarity Network will bring together a broad-based network of activists to not only outline a plan to support Québec students, but to also build Ontario's movement in the fight to reduce tuition fees and for accessible post-secondary education.

The assembly will release a statement of solidarity and planned actions at Friday morning's press conference. Representatives of students and academic staff will also denounce the Québec government's response to student demonstrations and Law 78.

WHAT: Press conference to oppose Law 78 and outline Ontario's course of action to oppose tuition fees

WHERE: Queen's Park Media Studio

WHEN: May 25, 2012 at 9:00 AM

WHO: Labour and student activists from Ontario and Québec.

The Canadian Federation of Students-Ontario unites more than 300,000 college and university undergraduate and graduate students in all regions of the province. The Québec Student Strike reached day 100 on Tuesday, May 22.

http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/980157/media-advisory-students-staff-and...

6079_Smith_W

The Saskatoon Star Phoenix did not have kind words for Jean Charest:

While the world watches in amazement as Quebec Premier Jean Charest snatches defeat from the jaws of victory, it's a reminder of the need to develop solid public policy before the streets start to burn..

While governments are focused on austerity measures and worried about inflation, the needs of this enormous amount of humanity has slipped off the table. As Nobel laureate Amartya Sen wrote in a recent New York Times op-ed: "The worthy but narrow intentions of the European Union's policy-makers have been inadequate for a sound European economy and have produced instead a world of misery, chaos and confusion."

It is important that governments don't lose sight of the needs of all citizens - including the already disenfranchised youth.

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Protests+hold+lessons/6669894/story.h...

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Where's Unionist? He usually chimes in once a day or so on these threads.

6079_Smith_W

He was here this morning.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Okay, thanks - I missed him, then.

lagatta

Back from my local cacerolazo. At least a thousand people, and that is just the immediate vicinity, not the whole "quartier" or "arrondissement" (neighbourhood in the larger sense, or borough/district). I have an old carbon-steel skillet with a wooden handle - sparqui would know those, as they are common in Spain and southwestern France) and a kind of mallet one uses to push blanched tomatoes through presses to make tomato sauce (which I used to do every September but no longer do). Since both have smooth wooden handles, they don't hurt my hands too much - a friend nearby already has blisters. Despite all that, my hands do hurt a bit.

I'm far from the oldest person at our local one. It is still going on, totally peaceful, not a casseur (violent troublemaker, whether political or just an arstle) in sight.

The student movement in Chile has sent us a message of support! Now, we just have to get everywhere in between in "Nuestra América" onside.

Have you seen the latest Maclean's cover page? Gutter press. Students as the "new ruling class"?

Unionist

epaulo13 wrote:

........................

Stop the tuition hikes: Filipino Canadian youth stand in solidarity with Quebec student strike

National statement
May 24, 2012

Toronto, ON—With the Quebec student strike now into its third month, ...

Fourth.

 

NDPP
Unionist

Boom Boom wrote:

Okay, thanks - I missed him, then.

Hi Boom Boom - I'm here, I'm safe and sound (more or less), been very busy and a tiny bit under the weather, but thanks for asking about me! The beautiful students keep me going through all adversity.

ETA: By the way, the useless mayor of Montréal Gérald Tremblay, who loves the rich and hates the youth, had asked people to bang pots on their balconies rather than doing so in the street. So, about a thousand pot-bangers have decided to visit the Mayor's home in Outremont, bang their pots outside his home, just to see if they're doing it right. We're awaiting the Mayor's response.

La loi spéciale [bang, bang, bang bang bang], on s'en câlisse! [bang, bang, bang bang bang]

 

Leigh

Mainstream media coverage, reported at http://montreal.mediacoop.ca/story/ten-points-everyone-should-know-about... has been irresponsible, biased and false, if not simply ignorant. 

The onslaught of bank, government, academic, media, 'think tank', police, and other forces has been hypcritical, full of lies, and destructive -not only through increasing fees, leaving students in debt, physically damaged for standing up for their rights, but destructive to our social fabric, And Our Economy.

Government deficits are OUR SURPLUSES- 'our' being households and businesses according to MMTP.

In the current Recession/Depression there is nothing 'progressive' about austerity, nothing 'worthy' about trying to sit on an austerity fence. http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2012/05/why-progressive-austerians-do... :

"Most public expenditures provide income to private merchants (suppliers), so the cuts in governmental spending further reduce already inadequate private sector demand.  The cuts in governmental spending can cause a recession that will simultaneously reduce tax revenues and increase the cost of governmental services for the unemployed.  As more people become unemployed other workers will fear losing their jobs and may reduce their expenditures (and businesses will tend to delay refilling inventory).  This can exacerbate the recession, as can deflation.  All of these things can cause austerity efforts to increase the budgetary deficit rather than reducing it. "

NDPP

Mass Arrests: Over 700 Canadian Protesters Detained in Police Crackdown (and vid)

http://www.rt.com/news/canada-police-arrest-students-tuition-110

On Tuesday, the movement marked the 100th day of demonstrations..."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Unionist wrote:

Hi Boom Boom - I'm here, I'm safe and sound (more or less), been very busy and a tiny bit under the weather, but thanks for asking about me!

It's just never the same without you. Smile

 

Unionist wrote:

ETA: By the way, the useless mayor of Montréal Gérald Tremblay, who loves the rich and hates the youth, had asked people to bang pots on their balconies rather than doing so in the street. So, about a thousand pot-bangers have decided to visit the Mayor's home in Outremont, bang their pots outside his home, just to see if they're doing it right. We're awaiting the Mayor's response.

LaughingLaughingLaughingLaughingLaughing

ETA: Are these demonstrations anywhere near the F1 race location? I wonder if that's the reason the riot cops decided to act? 

NDPP

31st Night Protest in Montreal (and vid)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/05/24/montreal-protest...

"The 31st night protest over as a growing number of Montrealers join a neighbourhood-wide cazeroleazo - casserole protest.."

Quebec Faces Mounting Pressure Amid Student Crisis (and vid)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/05/24/montreal-arrests...

"The pressure is mounting on Quebec to resolve the student crisis and end nightly protests across the province that have netted hundreds of arrests in recent days. Quebec Education Minister Michelle Courchesne acknowledged Thursday, 'the situation is really quite serious,' and student conflict must be resolved.

A third round of talks with the province's three main student federations will happen soon Courchesne said - likely in the next few days. Federations representing CEGEP college and university students as well as the more militant CLASSE group have all agreed to resume negotiations with the Liberal government.

The groups say they're ready to talk even if Quebec's hardline emergency protest law - Bill 78 - isn't on the table. But student leaders maintain the crisis would be defused if the contentious legislation was scrapped. So far the Liberal government has refused to discuss Bill 78, which was adopted last week to widespread criticism.."

love is free love is free's picture

the cacerolazo in the mile end was enormous, this is just the tail end of it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAa99OjBd_4

Unionist

Pot-banging demonstrations were reported in many neighbourhoods of Montréal, as well as other towns (Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Gatineau, Granby, Québec, Saguenay, Saint-Jérôme, La Prairie, Saint-Basile-le-Grand, and Saint-Eustache).

A demonstration of 500 in Granby!?

Something is happening here, and you don't know what it is. Do you, Mr. Charest?

 

Ghislaine

Thank you to everyone here for all of the updates! 

It is nice to get first-hand reports to counter the MSM. One thing I find most interesting is Mulcair's position on all of this - as a former Charest cabinet minister. I realize he is a federal politician, but it would be nice if he made a statement of support. 

What is wrong with Charest? And Marois doesn't really seem to be much of an effective opposition. I am so clueless quebec politics - when is your next election? 

unionist, that picture is just too cute! 

Maysie Maysie's picture

I'm going to be in Montreal this weekend (on the train right now, actually) so maybe I'll see some folks out there marching.

Mniemoeller

Catchfire wrote:

How much energy have the students put into "riot and mayhem"? From what I've seen, that's been the purview of the police, not the students.

At any rate, I find it extremely glib to tell students--historically and repeatedly betrayed by elected officials--how best to achieve the change they seek. Especially in the face of the most compelling and sustained demonstration againt entitled old-style politics for decades.

How much energy have the students put into "riot and mayhem"? Whether or not the "students" per se are guilty of these acts, they have occured and the students' spokespersons have not quite condemned these unlawful acts.

While reasonable individuals can understand the lengths either side could stoop to to manufacture public response, the sight of groups such as Black Bloc etc lends credulence to the fact that it is not simply the police trying to create an opportunity to respond.

Popular opinion in PQ is not behind the students. "Riot and mayhem" is not the method to promote the students' views to change that fact and, without wider appeal, if the agenda encompasses more than just tuition hikes, the students can only compromise or fail.

Glib? My point is that trusting politicians or elected officials will simply lead to more betrayal, leaving going directly to the people as the only remaining option.

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Heh. I wonder if E. May is reading this thread. The Greens show Mulcair how to do it.

Provincial and Federal Greens Condemn the Denial of Democracy

MONTREAL - The Green Party of Quebec and the Green Party of Canada stood united today to condemn the Charest government's high-handed approach chosen to resolve the student crisis through the adoption of Bill 78, the special law announced Wednesday night.

"The Charest government just added insult to injury," said Claude Sabourin, Leader of the Quebec Greens, who slammed the adoption of Bill 78 by the Quebec National Assembly. "Denying the right to protest is undemocratic not the best way to go about stopping them," said Sabourin, who strongly condemned the unilateral move by the Charest government.

"I worry a lot when I see Canadian governments, federal and provincial, interfering with our rights and liberties," said Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party of Canada and MP for Saanich-Gulf Islands. "The right to assembly is a fundamental right for everyone."

Not one to mince words, Sabourin was unequivocal: "Quebeckers seemed supportive of the Charest government's attempts to end the crisis. This time, I'm afraid the jig is up for good. Clearly, we will have elections this fall.  The Charest government has lost all sense of legitimacy."

NDPP

With the passage of Bill 78, recent indications are that popular opinion is with the students. And my own impressions are that by and large the student demos have been among the most congenial and charming mass movements around. -  hardly 'riot and mayhem', despite the best efforts of the authorities to provoke them. As for 'unlawful acts'the proto-fascist Bill 78 is the only unlawful Act we should be concerned about here..

Linger

It seems a largely un-reported element of this is the massive, peaceful, pro-social element in all these protests. Major sports events seem to leave more burned garbage and broken glass. The current red protest is amazing: to see hundreds of thousands protesting in the evening, week after week, the city largely treated with respect, could be a huge story. They seem to be an engaged, commited public, who gets out night after night. The peaceful organization earned my respect.

NorthReport

Tuition fight could spill outside Quebec as Ontario students get set to join protests

http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/05/25/ontario-students-poised-to-join-...

NDPP

a view from the UK...

Oh Canada

http://plashingvole.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/oh-canada.html

"...However, we have the French - or rather, French-Canadians to thank for another reminder of how to protest properly..The initial cause has fed into a general sense of social outrage. The Canadian Conservative government is one of the most unpleasant, self-righteous, reactionary, undemocratic the first world has seen for a generation: Prime Minister Harper has taken George Bush as a role model and perhaps gone even further.

The cuddly Canada of peacekeepers, William Shatner, Due South, Degrassi Jr High and Anne of Green Gables has been replaced by a vicious corporate puppet which seems to actively enjoy poisoning the planet through tar-sands oil..and yes Canadian voters are responsible for this insanity...If Canada's corporate government manages to smash Quebec, that's the end of social justice in North America."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Quebec students have filed a court challenge to strike down parts of the special provincial law that put limits on their right to protest.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/quebec-students-challenge-b...

6079_Smith_W

Full Comment in today's National Post. Its the older generation thats entitled; not students:

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/05/24/john-moore-its-the-older-...

NDPP

Boom Boom wrote:
Quebec students have filed a court challenge to strike down parts of the special provincial law that put limits on their right to protest.
">http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/quebec-students-challenge-b... NDPP

Bill 78 does not only affect student protests of course. Although it seems to have disappeared from the coverage, there is still opposition, Indigenous and others, to Plan Nord for example...

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I am in awe of the small protests in neighbourhoods as much as the large demonstrations.  Families banging pots like it was New year's Eve is scaring the fuck out of Charest and his cronies.  Maybe even more than the students themselves and the two together are an unbeatable political force aimed squarely at him.

Bärlüer

Crawling out of my hole a little...

Unionist wrote:

Something is happening here, and you don't know what it is. Do you, Mr. Charest?

Smile

Maysie wrote:
I'm going to be in Montreal this weekend (on the train right now, actually) so maybe I'll see some folks out there marching.

I don't know if you were being tongue-in-cheek... Anyway, you'd have to work quite hard to NOT be a witness to some sort of student-related event. No place is safe now—even Saint-Eustache has been overtaken by terrifying, smiling hordes of casseroleurs! Muhuahahahahaha!

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I am in awe of the small protests in neighbourhoods as much as the large demonstrations.  Families banging pots like it was New year's Eve is scaring the fuck out of Charest and his cronies.  Maybe even more than the students themselves and the two together are an unbeatable political force aimed squarely at him.

You'll probably like this video then...

Freedom 55

torontoprofessor wrote:

Unfortunately, that facebook link is now dead. Do you know of any other source for this? (My attempts to search for the video on YouTube haven't been successful.)

 

This one's working (for now).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCS5rQH0OYg

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

cco

Boom Boom wrote:

ETA: Are these demonstrations anywhere near the F1 race location? I wonder if that's the reason the riot cops decided to act? 


The race itself is, I believe, held at Parc Jean-Drapeau, on an island in the middle of the St. Lawrence, where the casino and La Ronde are. So that, in and of itself, should be relatively easy for police to secure, as the only ways in and out are via bridge or metro.

However, Grand Prix time typically floods downtown with a human wall of tourists and revelers, particularly on Crescent Street (and there are no hotels on the island, anyway), and a protest in the middle of *that* would pose a real challenge for police.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Laurier faculty to send funds to striking Quebec students

The faculty association at Wilfrid Laurier University has pledged its support to striking students in Quebec.

At a general meeting on Thursday morning, the association voted to provide $10,000 to help defray legal costs amassed by student groups or individuals, said president Judy Bates.

The association will also send a letter to Quebec Premier Jean Charest denouncing the passage of an emergency law, Bill 78, and its “attack on civil liberties and human rights,” Bates said.

The association joins a host of other groups and unions from across Canada that have sent money to Quebec to go towards everything from fines to the buses and food needed for the ongoing protests.....

http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/730756--laurier-faculty-to-s...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Ministry scolds bureaucrats who support Que. students

Quebec's education department chided employees this month for openly supporting the student strike movement while on the job, QMI Agency has learned.

QMI obtained a memo, dated May 3, sent to all ministry employees reminding them of their ethical obligations.

"A few employees of the education ministry are wearing symbols connected with the anti-tuition-hike movement when they are at work and performing their duties," read part of the memo.

"You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry."

The memo is part of a series of documents related to a complaint against the ministry that a department staffer filed with Quebec's Human Rights Commission.

A source close to the case said the employee has complained to the commission about the emergency law enacted on May 18, that bans spontaneous protests of more than 50 people and imposes heavy fines on anyone caught preventing someone from attending classes.....

http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/News/national/2012/05/25/19799761.html

Mniemoeller

Unionist wrote:

Pot-banging demonstrations were reported in many neighbourhoods of Montréal, as well as other towns (Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Gatineau, Granby, Québec, Saguenay, Saint-Jérôme, La Prairie, Saint-Basile-le-Grand, and Saint-Eustache).

A demonstration of 500 in Granby!?

Something is happening here, and you don't know what it is. Do you, Mr. Charest?

 

Excellent strategic manoevre to gain popular support and to deflect attempts by authority to brand the protests 'illegal'. Moving away from confrontation with authority toward a popular revolt a la Orange Revolution will snowball.

Of course, the passionate embrace of pot banging is an added bonus.

Leigh

"There were no reports of injuries or casualties." from post 71 link. 

vs.

"There were calls for an independent investigation into how one demonstrator, Maxence Valade, lost an eye and another, Alexandre Allard, was knocked unconscious – suffering a skull fracture and brain contusion after being hit in the head by what many witnesses said was a plastic bullet." Vancouver Sun, Montreal Gazette, http://www.vancouversun.com/news/never+seen+police+like+this/6582164/sto..., linked from Co-op Montreal noted in post 70,which had a clear report.

Students who protested at the FTAA in Quebec City were injured with plastic bullet wounds, some were beaten, hospitalized, and a Quebec police provocateur dressed as a protester was proven to be throwing rocks at Montebello.  It's good that police are being held accountable following the G20. When will police behaving illegally get charged in Quebec for current protests?

---

Leigh

i'm glad the CBC was clear about

"Bill 78, which was adopted last week to widespread criticism.." (post73).

i'll read through other items...

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Mniemoeller wrote:
Of course, the passionate embrace of pot banging is an added bonus.

Ha! I suppose that's the kind of "riot and mayhem" we can agree upon, Mneimöller.

Leigh

It's good to hear that the Greens critiqued Bill 78, which would affect all 'spontaneous gatherings of 50 people or more', including Indigenous dissent. Indigenous people lived on the land first, and have rights...

It's good Quebec students are challenging Bill 78 in court, that Wilfred Laurier faculty are supporting the students, that people in towns and villages and other cities, provinces, and internationally are acting too, noting the inequality and injustice rampant today.

One hundred days opposing harrassment and assault- physical, economic, political, and emotional,  is a Strength.

re:83, on Harper's shameful record- 'Canadian voters are responsible for this', well, perhaps not entirely, given electoral fraud, which ought to be investigated and reported, not swept under the rug.  Also, though we may experience set-backs, it's never 'the end of social justice'..

re:93; Quebec's education dept. issued a very heavy-handed statement: "You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry." Was that spelled out in employment contracts? And even if it was, the interests of the ministry are to defend the interests of students, to support full funding and to stop increased debt for students, rather than help bankers get richer.

It's in all our interest to defend the interests of students, and defend our own interests against illegal and irresponsible behaviour by those in power.

Responsible government behaviour involves spending -creating- money, debt and interest-free, to provide universal public services and jobs, and laws to restrain bankers' power to prevent responsible government.

 

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Events unfolding in Quebec are so insprining when everything coming from the Harper Regime is so bleak. Let's hope this people power spreads.

That's my hope in this very bleak landscape.

Bärlüer

Leigh wrote:

re:93; Quebec's education dept. issued a very heavy-handed statement: "You have the obligation of loyalty and allegiance towards (the education department), which requires you to defend the interests of the ministry." Was that spelled out in employment contracts? 

The obligation of loyalty (of an employee toward its employer) is a legal obligation set out by the Civil Code of Quebec that applies to all employment contracts.

But there are other norms at play here than the obligation of loyalty—most particularly freedom of expression.

The article isn't clear on what exactly the memo said, though, so it's hard to comment further on that. (Were they asked not to wear the red square? Not mentioned. Were disciplinary measures threatened/taken? Not mentioned. Etc.)

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