Student strike - nightmare of the 1% (#14)

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Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

A friend sent these photos from the Université de Montréal on their first day of school.....

Quite a show of intimidation. Who would want to go to a school with that many fucking cops in it???

Slumberjack

I can understand revolting against the very notion of the police state that we are, or subjectivity producing educational systems in general, or even a simple dislike for Charest would be reason enough by itself, but doesn't a protest over tuition hikes have all the flavour of a tax revolt?  Is there really anything else to it that should fix our imaginations here?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Get the fucking cops out of the school, then we'll talk.

 

love is free love is free's picture

yeah, that one in the bottom left corner gives me the creeps.  i took a class at that building once, it's almost always totally deserted at that entrance, aside from a few people smoking or talking on the phone.  it's just weird.  i think it's totally part of a strategy to turn uninformed students against the strikers by making them feel like the strikers are introducing an unwelcome element into the campus, but just that visual makes me think that this show of force could easily push students the other way.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Have any songs emerged from the Quebec student movement?  Seems to me they need something that's the equivalent of this:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8mzCDrE1ds

 

(doesn't have to be folky, obviously...something involving hip-hop would probably be more effective)

lagatta

I spent many, many years in that building (because I did my studies part-time while working). You can see what a residential neighbourhood U d'M is located in, unlike the three other universities (well, Loyola campus of Concordia is even more remote - U d'M is served by three métro stations). Boring. But that is probably why I was able to graduate, as at a place such as UQAM or Concordia I'd have been involved in activism full-time, as always happened when I was younger.

Several songs have come out of the student movement and the casseroles. We have posted some here earlier, scroll back.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

This is what democracy looks like.  As a society we will bomb anyone who disputes that our way is the true path to freedom.

Money mouth

Unionist

Well...

Since February, the Charest Liberals have pompously repeated that the tuition issue would be settled not by demonstrators, but by voters.

The students mobilized to get out the vote against Charest.

Tonight, the Liberals are gone. Charest is gone. And the students have won!

Les étudiants, les vrais gagnants!!

 

WyldRage

Don't yell victory too soon. The PLQ is too strong still and can easily impose their will for student tuition with the help of the CAQ.

For my part, I must applaud the fear and hatred campaign from the Liberals and the English media which managed to hold off the forces of progress in Québec for another 1-4 years.

Unionist

WyldRage wrote:

Don't yell victory too soon. The PLQ is too strong still and can easily impose their will for student tuition with the help of the CAQ.

Yes, I fully understand that. I know that every victory is tactical, temporary, and fragile.

But I could never stand defeatism and pessimism and cynicism. So I hail the heroism of the students and their allies. They never gave up, they played their cards right during the election, and they're still here - and the government which attacked them is gone. If that doesn't go down in history, what will?

Quote:
For my part, I must applaud the fear and hatred campaign from the Liberals and the English media which managed to hold off the forces of progress in Québec for another 1-4 years.

Don't overestimate the strength of the enemy. Just organize to defeat them. I have no intention of growing old lonely and depressed, consoling myself that they were so strong and we were so weak. We Will Win.

 

Unionist

I loved this story and especially the photo - gotta post it before it goes too stale:

[url=http://www.ledevoir.com/politique/elections-2012/358468/euphorie-chez-le... among the students[/url]

Quote:
The president of the CÉGEP Students Federation of Québec, Éliane Laberge, and the president of the University Students Federation, Martine Desjardins, weren't hiding their joy Tuesday evening:

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Students+must+keep+pressure+over... should maintain pressure against PQ, CLASSE says[/url]

Quote:

CLASSE, along with the other main student associations, says it is opposed to tuition being indexed to the cost of living, which is what the PQ had pledged during the campaign.

What’s more, CLASSE wants something beyond the tuition freeze promised by the PQ. It wants the boost to the loans and bursaries system promised by the Liberals, as well.

So, despite a pledge from PQ leader Pauline Marois on Wednesday to cancel the tuition increase and repeal Bill 78 by decree, the seventh consecutive student demonstration on the 22nd of the month is still planned for September, and students say they’re not going to abandon their mobilization so quickly.

Unionist

[url=http://www.mcgilldaily.com/2012/09/tuition-hike-to-be-abolished-today-sa... hike to be abolished today, says FECQ[/url]

Quote:

The $1625 tuition hike announced last year by the Liberal government of Jean Charest is to be cancelled today, according to Éliane Laberge, the President of the Fédération étudiante collégiale du Quebec (FECQ).

“[The Parti Québécois (PQ)] told us that they would announce it after their first ministerial meeting,” Laberge told The Daily in French.

Because the hike is not a law passed by the National Assembly, the tuition hike can be repealed by a ministerial decree.

 

lagatta

I'll be waiting for that - we can get out les casseroles!

Bärlüer

There it is.

The PQ government has just abrogated by decree Bill 78 and abolished the tuition fees' hike.

Credit where credit's due:

First and foremost, of course, to the students (and their supporters).

Second, to the PQ government for keeping its word and not coming up with some sort of half-assed resolution.

The first part of the battle has been won.

Onto the next fight, in preparation for the summit on education financing/accessibility.

 

Unionist

Darn - Bärlüer beat me to the draw. I was too happy to type when I heard the official announcement!

The people fight, the people win. It happens sometimes. Just like in the movies.

I'm so happy.

 

Bärlüer

Update:

It couldn't be so simple... <sigh...>

Apparently, not all the provisions of Bill 78 will be abrogated. The provisions that relate to demonstrations will be abrogated, but those that pertain to the school calendar will be maintained. Here's the relevant quote from the article in La Presse:

Quote:
Mme Marois n'abrogera que la portion de la loi 12 qui limite le droit de manifester. Le volet sur le calendrier scolaire, qui permet aux établissements de récupérer à temps les heures de cours perdues à cause des grèves du printemps dernier, demeurera. Il arrivera à échéance à la fin de l'année scolaire, en juin 2013.

Even with this quote, I don't think it's entirely clear precisely what sections will be kept in force. So I won't be screaming one way or another just yet.

Unionist

I agree that it's not clear... but in fairness, she can't abrogate the part about extending the session, can she? Most of that is already done, and what effect would it have - to retroactively allow the winter session to conclude? To nullify the August and September extensions? Maybe she'll keep the draconian parts forcing teachers to stay on the job (even though they weren't likely in a legal position to strike anyway). So again, I agree, let's wait, but I'm not wiping the smile off my face any time soon!

 

Bärlüer

My main concern is that it's not only sections 16 and 17 that are abrogated. I hope sections 10 and 15 are also abrogated.

Unionist

Question: Section 35 appears to allow the government to determine a date earlier than July 1, 2013, upon which "the provisions" of the act (all of them, the way I read it) would cease to have any effect. I don't see any other way than by using Section 35 that the government can unilaterally "abrogate" anything in the act, without going to the National Assembly - where they stand a good chance of failing in that effort, given the prior stand of the Liberals and the CAQ.

If my reading is correct, what means does Marois have to selectively "abrogate" some sections and not others?

 

lagatta

Well, we'll just have to keep up the pressure about that.

I don't trust her (or more important, the PQ) either, but we must not fail to celebrate a historic popular victory, while remaining vigilant.

Get out the bubbly!

Bärlüer

Unionist wrote:

Question: Section 35 appears to allow the government to determine a date earlier than July 1, 2013, upon which "the provisions" of the act (all of them, the way I read it) would cease to have any effect. I don't see any other way than by using Section 35 that the government can unilaterally "abrogate" anything in the act, without going to the National Assembly - where they stand a good chance of failing in that effort, given the prior stand of the Liberals and the CAQ.

If my reading is correct, what means does Marois have to selectively "abrogate" some sections and not others?

Interesting question. I don't know if there's any sort of precedent of a similar nature.

However, one way to read s. 35 that might lead the government to believe that it can selectively decide which provisions cease to have effect is that if it were to be only the whole Act or nothing, s. 35 would have read "The Act ceases to have effect [...]".

Bärlüer

Unionist wrote:

Question: Section 35 appears to allow the government to determine a date earlier than July 1, 2013, upon which "the provisions" of the act (all of them, the way I read it) would cease to have any effect. I don't see any other way than by using Section 35 that the government can unilaterally "abrogate" anything in the act, without going to the National Assembly - where they stand a good chance of failing in that effort, given the prior stand of the Liberals and the CAQ.

If my reading is correct, what means does Marois have to selectively "abrogate" some sections and not others?

Interesting question. I don't know if there's any sort of precedent of a similar nature.

However, one way to read s. 35 that might lead the government to believe that it can selectively decide which provisions cease to have effect is that if it were to be only the whole Act or nothing, s. 35 would have read "The Act ceases to have effect [...]".

ETA: Oh. And the plural on "dates" clearly provides for the possibility of different expiry dates set by the government for different provisions.

Unionist

Good catch - "à la date ou aux dates". Still poorly drafted IMHO. And I guess it's now section 36 rather than 35? I lost track when Bill 78 became Bill 12.

 

Unionist

From rabble's own Ethan Cox - his twitter feed:

[url=https://twitter.com/EthanCoxMtl/status/249585370491142145/photo/1]A couple thousand people braving miserable weather for free education[/url]

And as always:

[url=http://twitter.yfrog.com/12k3pjyfyvnrpoypirkjeylgz]Police attack protester on camera, officer numbers recorded[/url]

From Le Devoir:

[url=http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/education/359831/des-centaines-de-person... demonstrate in Montréal for free education[/url]

and

[url=http://www.ledevoir.com/politique/quebec/359832/greve-etudiante-qs-deman...ébec solidaire demands public inquiry on police activity during student strike[/url]

Sorry, I can't cite the English media yet. They suck.

 

cco

Ethan's a friend of mine. His commitment and energy, both in the student strike and the Topp campaign beforehand, are insane.

Also, he taught me how to drink heavily.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

This appeared on my FB feed this morning:

autoworker autoworker's picture

With Marois herself being of the 1%, will the students keep her up at night in their struggle for free tuition?

Jacob Two-Two

Hey Boom Boom. Is there a group that that came from? I'd like to post that on my wall.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

A friend of mine posted it - I'm not sure where it came from. Should be easy to copy. Just right click and go to "properties", and copy that, and paste.

ETA: http://sphotos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s480x480/404706_526611104032095_2001982891_n.jpg

lagatta

It is wonderful. Globe and Mail article sucks a bit, but less than I would have expected: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/with-quebecs-tuition-hikes-...

Probably not a good idea to read the comments - I haven't. Sure "Québec spoiled brats" is a common theme - though perhaps they are just jealous.

That is a great graphic, Boom Boom. Wanted to tell everyone that some friends and elder comrades who came from Chicago to attend Magnus Isaacson's memorial already had red squares - the teachers' union movement had adopted them! They've also made their way to Chile and Mexico, where there are also important student movements ongoing.

Unionist

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois is in court in Québec City today, answering charges of "contempt of court" brought by an individual student from Laval University, alleging Gabriel incited students to disobey court injunctions last spring aimed at busting picket lines. Demonstrations are being organized outside the courthouse and another this evening.

[url=http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/Quebec/2012/09/27/002-proces-gabriel-... more here...[/url]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

From a friend: 

 Concordia University Message to Students:
Important information regarding tuition fee payments:

The Government of Quebec has rescinded the tuition fee increase of $8.47 per credit for the 2012-13 academic year. However, Concordia cannot make any adjustments to student accounts until it receives official directives from the government.

ps: this is my sixth effort at trying to post. I hate this !@#$%!!!! babble "upgrade".

Bärlüer

Bärlüer wrote:
Apparently, not all the provisions of Bill 78 will be abrogated. The provisions that relate to demonstrations will be abrogated, but those that pertain to the school calendar will be maintained. [...] I don't think it's entirely clear precisely what sections will be kept in force. So I won't be screaming one way or another just yet.

[...]

My main concern is that it's not only sections 16 and 17 that are abrogated. I hope sections 10 and [sic: I meant to write "to"] 15 are also abrogated.

So... I've now seen the decree... and my fears have been completely assuaged. Almost the entirety of the law has actually been declared to be of no force. (For the sake of completeness, here are the sections that have been put away: some definitions in s. 1 ("student association", "federation of associations", "employee"), ss. 2, 3, 5, 10 to 34 and the part of s. 35 that mentions the Minister of Public Security.)

This makes me very happy. Smile

Unionist

Unionist, on Sept. 20 wrote:

So again, I agree, let's wait, but I'm not wiping the smile off my face any time soon!

 

Ok, now my smile muscles are starting to ache. But I'm still smiling! What a victory.

lagatta

This is a magnificent victory, up there with the Common Front struggle and General Strike in 1972 (exactly 40 years before! (jeez...)

But we must not forget that, as with the Common Front victory, leaders - not just the most central ones - had to pay a high price. Charbonneau, Laberge and Pepin, the trade union confederal presidents, were not the only trade unionists jailed.

Remember that Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois and others face similar sanctions. We have to defend our comrades.

Unionist

lagatta wrote:
Remember that Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois and others face similar sanctions. We have to defend our comrades.

Speaking of which, did you see or hear a single statement of support for him from any student or workers' organization, while he awaits the court's decision on this farcical contempt charge?

 

Bärlüer

Bärlüer wrote:

So... I've now seen the decree... and my fears have been completely assuaged. Almost the entirety of the law has actually been declared to be of no force. (For the sake of completeness, here are the sections that have been put away: some definitions in s. 1 ("student association", "federation of associations", "employee"), ss. 2, 3, 5, 10 to 34 and the part of s. 35 that mentions the Minister of Public Security.)

This makes me very happy. Smile

Here it is, finally available for public consumption.

Unionist

Very good.

Now what about the Montréal bylaws banning demos whose itinerary isn't communicated in advance to the cops (which must have been the pretext of far more arrests than Bill 78), and the wearing of masks?

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/711.php]Just the Beginning: Beyond the Québec Student Strike[/url]

 

Bärlüer

Unionist wrote:

Very good.

Now what about the Montréal bylaws banning demos whose itinerary isn't communicated in advance to the cops (which must have been the pretext of far more arrests than Bill 78), and the wearing of masks?

Yes, the amendment to the Montreal by-law is almost even more problematic. Section 500.1 of the Highway Safety Code has also been used for many arrests; I know it is actually being challenged as part of the trial(s) for these arrests.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

UofT attacks Quebec students: Accessible Excellence

excerpt:

Recently, university students in Quebec have been protesting plans to boost tuitions in that province – currently the lowest in Canada. One student leader has argued that the proposed increases threaten the principle that “education should be something that is available to everyone, regardless of social status.”

That argument certainly sounds plausible. However, study after study has shown that reducing or eliminating tuition fees would make education less accessible to the very people the students aim to help. Across Canada and in other parts of the world, jurisdictions with low tuition fees tend to enrol fewer university students per capita than those with higher fees. In the European countries with free tuition, for example, participation rates are about two-thirds of Canada’s. And Quebec’s participation rates are sharply lower than Ontario’s.

Why? A low- or no-tuition policy limits the supply of places in universities. Conversely, higher tuitions make more spots available. With enlightened policies that see institutions using new revenues to discount tuitions for lower-income students, more of those spots can be taken by the best and brightest, regardless of socio-economic standing.

- snip -

Unionist

Bastards.

[url=http://montreal.mediacoop.ca/story/ex-student-spokesperson-nadeau-dubois... spokesperson Nadeau-Dubois found guilty of contempt [/url]

 

lagatta

We should be calling out a general protest tonight, but it will be hard to do, as people are exhausted from months of marches, and winter (yecch) is closing in.

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/dossiers/conflit-etudiant/201211/01/01...

This must not pass!

Unionist

(Jeanne Reynolds and Camille Robert, co-spokespersons of CLASSE)

At a congress held today at the Université du Québec à Montréal, the affiliated student organizations of ASSÉ voted to dissolve CLASSE. CLASSE had been formed in December 2011 as a temporary mobilizing force to fight the Charest government fee hikes. Now that those hikes are history, CLASSE is dissolved. The congress also decided to prepare the next step of the struggle: The fight for free education. That will be the theme of a mass meeting of students on December 1 and 2.

The spokespersons of ASSÉ said that while they are observing a "truce" at present, they are under no illusions about Pauline Marois's government. They remember how Marois also tried to increase tuition fees the last time she was in government.

[url=http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/societe/2012/11/03/003-classe-disso...

Unionist

The CSN (Québec's largest trade union federation) today called on all its affiliates to support Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois's appeal of his contempt conviction. Meanwhile, Nadeau-Dubois announced that in the 48 hours since he announced his decision, he has received $58,000 from 1,700 donors.

[url=http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/societe/2012/11/04/001-nadeau-duboi...

Unionist

After hearing sentencing arguments today, the judge has reserved his decision.

As of Nov. 7, Gabriel's defence fund was over $85,000. The two-bit fascist lawyer for the complainant actually used that as an argument that a fine wouldn't be enough of a penalty. He wants 30 days in jail for Nadeau-Dubois, or 150 hours of "community service".

The courtroom was so packed with supporters when the media arrived that they had to watch the proceedings by video on another floor.

 

lagatta

The lawyer and the piece of dogshit making the complaint againt Nadeau, a certain Morasse...

I'm sure Morasse will get his. No, I'm not alluding to any form of violence. Just a good case of shunning, or perhaps spitting on the ground or holding one's nose when the little fascist shit walks by.

Classic ways to treat scabs.

Unionist

Breaking news:

Some university faculties and Cégeps will follow ASSÉ's call for a one-week strike, starting tomorrow, calling for free tuition.

lagatta

Unfortunately - or fortunately - I have too much work today to attend. Hope it is a success!

Rightwing pols, editorialists, columnists etc are falling over each other insulting the students and their movement. 

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