Student Strike - a turning point? #12

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NDPP

Autonomous Neighbourhood Assemblies!

http://www.qpirgconcordia.org/?p=3479

"Autonomous neighbourhood assemblies are being organized all over Montreal.."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

NDPP wrote:

"Autonomous neighbourhood assemblies are being organized all over Montreal.."

A lot of potential there!

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Manif casseroles d'appui à Paris ce 1er juin

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Timidity in Democracy

With the current student movement, a whole set of questions about acceptable gestures of dissent arise, and opposing violent gestures, which need to be condemned and fought by the armed hands of the State, the police. From the outset, I must clarify that there is no objective response here that would satisfy a Cartesian mind, because in a democratic and peaceful society like ours, the problem is one of sensibilities. An overview of media coverage exposes an trend that I think is worrying for a democracy. It is as if our comfort and languidness make us intolerant to political actions which aim to create a powerful relationship with public authorities.

What is disturbing is the idea that we have achieved such a high degree of economic well-being and political freedom that we imagine, all “immodest” claims can only be raised by the eternally irresponsible and unsatisfied. All that really remains for us is to enjoy an eternal status quo where the government plays a management role making “rational” decisions motivated by efficiency and technocratic (hence apolitical) reasoning and allowing for accommodation at the margins (indexing rather than raising tuition, for example). We’ve become conservatives of the present since we’re happy to forget that the present conflict emanates from important and radical struggles in the past … that the conservatives used similar terms to condemn people back then too.....

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture
love is free love is free's picture

it's really just the end for charest, no matter what the polling says.  at this point, he's among the most hated figures in canadian political history, up there with another westmounter, our old pal brains mulroney.  what we need to do is make sure that we can convert every ounce of support and funnel every ounce of activism into the québec solidaire political outlet and try to get ourselves a radical bloc in the assembly, hopefully in a minority parliament situation where the pq somehow decides to govern from the left.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

This country needs to get rid of the really bad governing scum: Harper, McGuinty, and Charest. Christy Clark will likely be shown the door next year. 

NorthReport
Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Excerpt:

But many members of his (Mulcair) caucus have links to Québec Solidaire. That could lead to some behind-the-scenes action that stands to further divide the nationalist vote the PQ needs to win the provincial campaign.

 

Well, that will make Charest's day for sure. Frown

love is free love is free's picture

wow, that's a really insightful article by chantal.  pretty much exactly in line with my own analyses.  to recapitulate:

- the polls that show charest ahead are more voters in the conservative regions supporting the government's line against the students than it is actual support for the liberal party.  in an election campaign, this support will crumble - if the right alternative is there.

- solidaire is going to win more than 1 seat, my guess is that they sweep the entirety of old montreal (that is, pre-agglomeration montreal).  even the far east pq fiefs will be at risk, just like during the ndp wave.  but it's difficult to see the left doing all that well off-island or in the regions.  basically, solidaire is a montreal party and the caq are a regional party, so we can expect that the pq and plq fatigue will translate into an even more darkly right-wing representation in the estrie, in lévis and the ring around the capital, in the more francophone townships ridings.

- marois is just flailing.  it's been so long that she sold out that she doesn't even remember when it was.  she has held virtually every position on the political spectrum in just the past 18 months, and in a left vs right crisis, you have these fools like curzi going on about sovereignty.  the generational divide is enormous, and while i appreciate that the highest echelons of the pq are looking at us sympathetically, it doesn't really change the fact that they don't represent us at all.  there's that cartoon where the coyote runs off the cliff and can somehow run on air until he looks down and realizes that he's no longer on firm ground, and that seems to me the perfect metaphor for the quebec political class (aside from amir and the caq, but including the mayor of montreal) - they've already run off that cliff and sealed their fate, but they just don't realize it yet.

- the ndp is irrelevant to this discussion, but the ndp-solidaire-projet montréal front is completely intact.  basically, the way it works is the following: solidaire is separatist the way i am - i probably wouldn't vote to leave canada, but if it came to it, i'd 100% certainly take quebec citizenship over canadian, no question.  there is a perfect vertical integration of left activists in montreal ndp/qs/pm and there's not really a left in the rest of the province outside of the pq organization.  the students have massively boosted the standing of our happy group, and as i noted above, i suspect that we'll probably score 4-10 montreal seats in the next election.  and definitely, bergeron and pm is going to oust the former liberal minister tremblay lors du prochain scrutin.

love is free love is free's picture

just noticed this as the signature of a dude on a different forum - http://www.liberaux.net/

 

Bärlüer

At present, the only ridings that are somewhat takeable for QS, it seems to me, are Mercier (duh), Gouin, Sainte-Marie—St-Jacques, Hochelaga—Maisonneuve and Rosemont.

Even with respect to those five ridings only, there would have to be a profound shift within the population for QS to garner wins. Look at Rosemont, for instance. Sovereignist stronghold, deeply anchored and popular MNA (Louise Beaudoin, who has returned to the PQ bosom). Results in 2008: 50,66% PQ, 31,81% PLQ, 8,22% QS (and that's with a QS candidate who has some significant media visibility, François Saillant).

The current student struggle is, obviously, the perfect candidate for a trigger for such a profound shift. Will it translate electorally...? And then there is of course the precedent of the Orange wave. Will there be a Front de gauche-like momentum for QS in Montreal...? I tend to be skeptical—which isn't to say I can't hold out hope...

Catchfire Catchfire's picture
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Canada Post: Suspended for their red square

Canada Post suspended two Montreal employees on Friday for wearing the red square in support of the student movement.

Management previously advised some employees verbally that it was not desirable to show support to the student cause. For the past few weeks several employees had been wearing the red square but Canada Post decided to clamp down on Friday.

According to the Union, the two suspended employees ignored the verbal notice and continued to wear the piece of cloth.

One of them also wore a pin denouncing the special law voted in June 2011 forcing 48 000 Canada Post employees to put an end to their strike.

Suspensions Lifted

The suspensions were finally lifted Saturday morning and both employees affected by the sanctions will be reimbursed the hours of work that was taken from them. However, the restriction to wear the red square remains in effect, which does not please the Union.

“For us it is simply a question of freedom of expression. We have to understand that a year ago we got a special law as well, a law forcing us to return to work, a law that served no purpose since a year later, nothing has been solved”, explained Alain Duguay President of the Union of Postal Workers.

Mr. Duguay is asking management to reconsider its decision and allow employees the freedom to choose to take position on certain topics, providing it does not involve symbols of hatred or defamation.

Canada Post declined requests for interviews stating that they would not comment on exceptional cases involving employees.

cco

Yeah, I'm working to elect my friend Zoé Gagnon-Paquin in Westmount-Saint-Louis (which covers a significant part of "pre-agglomeration Montréal" in addition to Westmount proper), and I have to say I'm less optimistic about QS sweeping here than love is free is. There would need to be some kind of strong tipping point -- a knockout debate performance, a revelation from the Charbonneau commission that implicated both the Liberals and the PQ (and, by association, the CAQ), or ideally both. Friends of mine who are plugged into such things intimate that QS is feeling out Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois to run for them this cycle, but then, they'd be fools not to.

love is free love is free's picture

Bärlüer wrote:

At present, the only ridings that are somewhat takeable for QS, it seems to me, are Mercier (duh), Gouin, Sainte-Marie—St-Jacques, Hochelaga—Maisonneuve and Rosemont.

Even with respect to those five ridings only, there would have to be a profound shift within the population for QS to garner wins. Look at Rosemont, for instance. Sovereignist stronghold, deeply anchored and popular MNA (Louise Beaudoin, who has returned to the PQ bosom). Results in 2008: 50,66% PQ, 31,81% PLQ, 8,22% QS (and that's with a QS candidate who has some significant media visibility, François Saillant).

The current student struggle is, obviously, the perfect candidate for a trigger for such a profound shift. Will it translate electorally...? And then there is of course the precedent of the Orange wave. Will there be a Front de gauche-like momentum for QS in Montreal...? I tend to be skeptical—which isn't to say I can't hold out hope...

yeah, but 2008 was a lifetime away.  at the qs victory party, even though charest managed to score a majority, we were thrilled - thrilled - at the election results.  this time around, after the ndp wave, i don't think there's anyone who doesn't believe that qs will massively increase their score.  the pq is releasing attack briefs on qs positions every few days, on places like vigile there's open concern that qs will steal away the inner montreal ridings with embarassing ease, we have the devoir warning us about splitting the independence vote, etc.  absolutely no chance we land more than 10 seats, no chance at all, but you mention rosemont, hochelaga, saint jacques, these hoods are going solidaire, probably massively, i'd guess that gouin will go solidaire by at least 10 points.  you just talk to people emptying their trash or whatever and they'll just start complaining about marois without prompting, people who'd never vote liberal or caq, they just don't want to vote for the pq anymore.  same thing with tremblay/harel, people just want them out, and you'll see them swept out of there pretty easily next year too.  it's hard to see if you're only talking to the anglophones - the older i get, the more i come to understand that they/we are actually the enemy - but luckily so many of them took themselves out of the game by demerging back in 2004, so that the francophone majority will rule, as it did during the federal elections.

Bärlüer

Perhaps you're not aware yet, cco, but unfortunately Zoé (whom I know to be a brilliant person) has retired from the campaign. So... I guess you don't know who is going to replace her...? (Sorry for the thread drift...)

cco

I was not aware of that, Bärlüer (though I now know why). No idea who'll replace her; perhaps the young man whose name I forget who was on the ballot at the nomination meeting, but withdrew before the vote so she could be acclaimed.

love is free, I can't seem to easily find census data on the current city of Montreal as opposed to the island or the CMA, but since the demerger wasn't a complete reversal, I'd hazard a guess that (particularly including Ville-Saint-Laurent) Montréal's "francophone majority" isn't as overwhelming as it was pre-merger. Tremblay, the Clay Davis of Canadian politics, was able to get reëlected without too much fuss simply by running against the PQ, after all.

love is free love is free's picture

qs will never win in westmount-saint louis, that's as lost as a cause gets.  but i see a line from cremazie all the way to the water.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002%E2%80%932006_municipal_reorganization_...

cco

Does anyone know what happened with the court challenge of Law 78?

Bärlüer

The hearing for the action to suspend the execution of the law (which in this case is actually a separate action from that challenging the law au fond) is supposed to be held on Monday. (It's been postponed a couple of times—the last time mostly to give breathing room to the then-ongoing negotiations.)

Unionist

A grey damp day, the elements conspiring to quench the people's ardour - but to no avail:

[url=http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/education/351551/une-autre-manifestation... of demonstrators brave the rain to participate in CLASSE's march[/url]

Quote:

The organizers estimated the crowd at 5-7,000 at 3 pm, then at 25,000 at 4 pm, according to CLASSE's Twitter feed.

The big demo, a "family" event, was declared illegal from the start by the Montréal police, because the organizers didn't provide their itinerary in accordance with municipal bylaw P-6. [...]

Many members of Québec solidaire were in attendance, in particular Amir Khadir, Françoise David and Manon Massé. [...]

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, CLASSE co-spokesperson, stated that this demonstration was also in violation of Bill 78, adding that he was very proud of this fact. His colleague Jeanne Reynolds pointed to the inapplicable nature of the law, adding that she was still waiting to be fined for all the illegal demonstrations in which she had participated.

[My translation.]

 

NDPP

The Quebec Student Strike and the Need for a Socialist Program  -  by Keith Jones

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2012/jun2012/pers-j02.shtml

"The Quebec student strike, now in its 16th week, has become a symbol and rallying point for opposition to austerity policies being implemented by all levels of government and all established parties across North America. The collapse of the provincial Liberal government's latest attempt to bully the students into submission through this week's phony negotiations and the mass opposition that has erupted against the government's draconian anti-protest law, Bill 78 are to be welcomed.

The pivotal question is: what is the way forward?"

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Solidarity With Quebec

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeU2YIcXm6g

SOLIDARITY FROM SUDBURY

......................

Quebec red squares in Auckland protest yesterday as police make 43 arrests on education cuts demo.


Photo

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

NDPP wrote:

The Quebec Student Strike and the Need for a Socialist Program  -  by Keith Jones

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2012/jun2012/pers-j02.shtml

"The Quebec student strike, now in its 16th week, has become a symbol and rallying point for opposition to austerity policies being implemented by all levels of government and all established parties across North America. The collapse of the provincial Liberal government's latest attempt to bully the students into submission through this week's phony negotiations and the mass opposition that has erupted against the government's draconian anti-protest law, Bill 78 are to be welcomed.

The pivotal question is: what is the way forward?"

This paragraph is nice but IMO the article is mostly a piece of drivel.  NDPP would you describe CLASSE as sellouts?

The article appears to me to be very dismissive of the student movement and lacking in a basic understanding of the general assembly's role in control of the strike and protest actions.  I guess the author can only envision a top down system and can't imagine the concept of participatory democracy.

ETA:

Hi Unionist cross posted with you.  After reading that article my keyboard was slippery from the foam spilling onto it, how about you?

Unionist

NDPP wrote:

The Quebec Student Strike and the Need for a Socialist Program  -  by Keith Jones

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2012/jun2012/pers-j02.shtml

"The Quebec student strike, now in its 16th week, has become a symbol and rallying point for opposition to austerity policies being implemented by all levels of government and all established parties across North America. The collapse of the provincial Liberal government's latest attempt to bully the students into submission through this week's phony negotiations and the mass opposition that has erupted against the government's draconian anti-protest law, Bill 78 are to be welcomed.

The pivotal question is: what is the way forward?"

Much as I appreciate the stories you link to, NDPP, I truly think you could give Keith Jones a miss. This asshole sits in the U.S. in some basement, condemning Canadian unions for not staying on strike as long as he thinks they should (epaulo13 exposed him nicely on that one [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/labour-and-consumption/cupw-strike-2#comment-126...), lecturing the students that they can't do anything on their own and should send delegations to the factories to "mobilize" workers (Bärlüer got him good on that one [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/qu%C3%A9bec/student-strike-against-tuition-hike-...), and now he's attacking the student associations as sell-outs:

Keith Jones, professional U.S. windbag wrote:

The single-issue protest perspective advanced by the student associations, which separates the students’ struggle against tuition fee hikes from a broader challenge to the austerity programs of the Quebec Liberal and federal Conservative governments, has not only failed. It has brought them into headlong conflict with the students they represent. [...]

On the student groups’ part, this formula is tied to their claim—explicit, in the case of FECQ or FEUQ, or implicit the case of CLASSE—that the youth have an interest in seeing the Liberals replaced at the next election by the Parti Québecois (PQ).

I won't quote any more of this crap. I would have politely advised Keith Jones to stay away from Québec for his own peace of mind, until I realized that he has never emerged from his basement to meet a student, let alone the abstract "workers" whom he idolizes but who are constantly disappointing him by failing to stay on strike until the ReVoLuTiOn triumphs.

 

Unionist

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Hi Unionist cross posted with you.  After reading that article my keyboard was slippery from the foam spilling onto it, how about you?

This is a recording. The subscriber you have called is not available at this time. He is out shopping for keyboards after his old one shorted out. Please hang up and try your call again.


Unionist

Hey epaulo, I posted that last night! But it's still a good article!

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..replaced a duplicate post

Injured in Victoriaville

Maxence Valade and Alexandre Allard are the two protesters who have been the most severely injured since the beginning of the student conflict. Both suffered traumas to the head during a Victoriaville riot on May 4. In the hours following the event, friends and family were left wondering whether one of them would even live. La Presse met with the two young men.

The only moment Alexandre Allard remembers from that night is when fellow protesters transported him away from the police line, from where tear gas was being launched. The rest is a complete blur. 

He learned of his short stay at the Victoriaville hospital from his friends and family. Even the source of the projectile that fractured his skull is unknown. His friends swear that they saw a rubber bullet. He believes it would have been impossible for him to have been hit by a projectile launched by a fellow protester because of the way he was standing; the side of his head that was hit was facing the police line, he said...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Unionist wrote:

Hey epaulo, I posted that last night! But it's still a good article!

..oops! i did read what you wrote unionist but didn't make the connection. anyway i've replaced it with another story.

love is free love is free's picture

it's tangential but i think not impertinent - these demos are a fantastic place to meet potential partners.  even my lazy-leftist brother (trademarked term, btw) is finally getting out in the streets because of the cool parties and babes he's hanging out with during/afterward, i'm a little worried that the protests are becoming less political and more carnivalesque.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..back in th 80' i bonded/connected with a woman while occupying the premier's vancouver offices. for me politics was enhanced.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

love is free wrote:

 I'm a little worried that the protests are becoming less political and more carnivalesque.

Not to worry, it's summer and the living is easy. Cool

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

The 'Raging Grannies' are back? 
 
Quebec bangs pots and pans in growing protests    
 
What started as a march against university tuition hikes has grown beyond students as the government moves to muzzle protest. Now even saucepan-wielding grannies are up in arms.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

A friend of mine in Montreal invited me to join this Facebook page: Prix Nobel de la Paix pour les étudiants du Québec! I'll have to think on this a bit.

 

ETA: If the student marchers were to bring about the cancellation of the Montreal Grand Prix, I'd be tempted to give them the Nobel Peace Prize for that alone!  :p   :))

Caissa

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, spokesman for hardline student association CLASSE, said he was questioned by the Sûreté du Québec on April 27.

According to Nadeau-Dubois, what first began as questioning on alleged death threats he had received soon turned into an interview about his activity with CLASSE.

Nadeau-Dubois told CBC News on Monday that the SQ asked him questions about his family, his roommate, his friends and CLASSE.

"My general feeling was that this was a warning from the SQ," he said.

Nadeau-Dubois says he spent nearly 80 minutes in an interrogation room with investigators working with the SQ's anti-terror unit.

"The exit was blocked off by a second investigator who stood against the door. I had no way of getting out. I answered all of the questions honestly but remained fairly vague," he said.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/story/2012/06/04/nadeau-dubois-in...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Arrogance + Election = Disaster

Nearly four months of crisis, a deadlock, and still no sign of a beginning of an end. Yet, within the Quebec Liberal Party (PLQ), there is silence. Neither a single criticism, nor a questioning of the matter at issue. Everything is just fine.

It has often been said that the biggest strength of the PLQ is its discipline, its esprit de corps, its unity in the pursuit of power, its loyalty to its leader.

But now, frankly, it’s no longer discipline that we’re seeing. Instead, the PLQ is in a vacuous state of servitude that has reduced what was once a great political institution into an accessory to one of the worst debacles that has occurred in Quebec in a long time.

Is there anyone within the party, caucus members or cabinet advisors, able to stand up and state the obvious—the emperor is naked!

Apparently, there is no one.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Québec has no money…Are you kidding?

Since 1995 the province of Quebec has granted between 75 and 120 billion dollars in subsidies to corporations according to different studies. After the “Yes” campaign defeat of 1995, Lucien Bouchard becomes Premier and installs the neo-liberal agenda of the Parti Québecois (PQ) along with it’s slogan “zero deficit”. The role of the state changes drastically and social-democracy takes a hit. Replaced by Bernard Landry, the state positions itself more and more like the milk cow of the great corporations, not under the guarantee of bank loans or loans from the Caisse de dépot, but from grants directly and indirectly given along with tax credits. Without knowing, the tax payer will pay a good portion of the salaries to Ubisoft, CGI, IBM, GM, Vidéotron and Olymel of this world…Most Québecois have no knowledge that they pay between 60 and 65% of research salaries for the great pharmaceutical companies, which resells the medications to us at a high price.....

NDPP

Northern Light - by Chris Hedges

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/northern_light_20120603/

"...There is still time to act. There still are mass movements to join. If the street protests in Quebec, the most important resistance movement in the industrialized world, spread to all of Canada and reach the US, there remains the possibility of hope."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Generation Wise

awesome video

Filmed at the 31st of May and 1st of June nightly protests in Montreal, Canada.

http://vimeo.com/43330466

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I find it interesting that Hedges never mentioned the role that the general assemblies have played in the student strike. He decries anarchy instead with his cartoon characterization of the Black Block. His inclusion of the Black Block in an article about the Quebec movement when it has been no more prominent in this protest movement than Duceppe's Bloc tells me he is still grinding the same axe no matter what the context. The move towards a different decision making system within a mass organization is what interests me the most and gives me the greatest hope.  In my opinion any anarchist society by definition would have participatory democracy as its centerpiece. 

I think he also misses the impact of the small neighbourhood protests.  50,000 people downtown is a magnet for security agencies.  50,000  people spread into marchs in 25 neighbourhoods are impossible to police without resorting to city wide marshal law.  Decentralization within organizational umbrella frameworks is also an anarchist idea.

Diversity is always stronger. Society will change little within the framework of our phoney "liberal" democracy. It might change when people start strolling in the streets together banging pots and actually meeting each other as equal citizens.  Imagine if those neighbours then started a discussion centered around positive change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Quebec, between anger and hope

Open letter on the part of university professors in Quebec and France    May 30, 2012

As university teachers and researchers in Quebec and France, we have a close rapport with our universities and our students, whose education we contribute to on both sides of the Atlantic. Faced with the current situation in Quebec, we are torn between anger and hope. Anger at the cynicism of a government that has repressed dialogue and let the situation deteriorate for too long. Hope in response to a blossoming movement that is sowing the seeds of irreversible change in its path.

Let’s start with the anger. Over the past three months, Premier Jean Charest and his government have plunged Quebec into one of the worst social crises in its history.

First of all, this crisis calls into question one of the founding principles of modern Quebec society: accessible university education for all. This model is a source of pride. The Quebec university system, in its current form, is closely linked to the building of a welfare state unique in North America that was devoted to the social and economic development of Quebec and to the enlightenment of its citizens. Part of this model’s prestige, seen from Europe, stems from its singularity. It is a treasure, and we should cherish it as such.

Meanwhile, there’s the cruel and cynical irony of making students pay for financial problems that Jean Charest’s liberal government directly fuelled for years. As decision-making processes in Quebec’s universities became less and less collegial and more and more “managerial,” risky investments were made, particularly in real estate, in spite of multiple warnings. Now, over 100 days into the crisis, Charest and his ministers still refuse to take stock of policies implemented in Quebec universities over the past several years. Tuition fees are made to be the scapegoat for everything.....

6079_Smith_W

kropotkin1951 wrote:

His inclusion of the Black Block in an article about the Quebec movement when it has been no more prominent in this protest movement than Duceppe's Bloc tells me he is still grinding the same axe no matter what the context. 

I think he implied that, here:

"Those of us who care about a civil society, and who abhor violence, should begin to replicate what is happening in Quebec."

I think you may have it backwards. He included the Quebec protests as a positive example in an article about not letting movements for social change be taken over by idealogues on the right or left. The lede notwithstanding, the central thesis of the article is not about the Quebec protests, nor even anti-austerity generally.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Coordination: first Global Education Strike in history!

quote:

Latest updates in connection with the global coordination efforts:

Participants of the chat meetings who discussed the idea to call for a Global Education Strike agreed on the following so far:

After setting up a poll, a call for feedback was sent via the global ISM mailing list to discuss a common timeframe for the Global Education Strike during chat meetings. Participants from Cairo, Kuala Lumpur, Marburg, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, Vienna, Zürich and some parts of Italy and Spain decided to call for a Global Day of Action for Education on October 18th and a Global Education Strike from November 14-21st!!....

http://ism-global.net/discussion_global_education_strike_2012

Unionist

Epaulo13 - who are these "global" people? Is there some actual movement going on which is going to be coordinated into a global strike, or just some wishful thinkers who are chatting in internet forums?

I don't mean to be disrespectful, but calling for global interplanetary inter-galactic student strikes (sort of like the idiotic calls for a "GENERAL STRIKE ON MAY DAY") are the very opposite of a real movement. For those who take these calls seriously (and there can't be many), it can only lead to frustration and feelings of impotence when the call inevitably fails.

My suggestion: Let's build real movements where we are. Then we can link them together. Otherwise, the chain will be as weak as its proverbially weakest link.

ETA: I also have serious doubts about movements in Ontario, Manitoba, etc. to "replicate" what's happening in Québec. Struggles which are not faithful to the specific historical context of the people in any region or sphere are bound to fail. There are plenty of real issues, real problems, and real battles going on under our noses. No one needs to copy anyone else's. And fighting your own battles (against the same enemy of course) is the best way to show solidarity with someone else.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

unionist

..when the indignants began organizing in spain or occupy wall street you could have asked the same question. who are these people? in answer all i can say is people come together in many different ways. i don't understand your “real movement” comment nor why this all bothers.

..i believe you are being disrespectful to those who brought together so many people/communities into the streets. you probably followed the thread that reported on ows may 1st strike but for others that didn't here is a link to just one posting i made where you can scroll through the actions being taken then to the bottom and see the endorsers list and decide for yourselves if it is a “real movement”.

http://occupywallst.org/article/nyc-full-schedule-permitted-and-unpermitted-may-da/

..i believe resistance on a global level is being organized in many different ways and i just don't share your concerns. it's not a matter of we should organize together to fight back but acceptance that it is already happening and we here are mostly spectators in how that organizing is taking place.

..having said the above i have followed this web site for some time now and have watched it become militant..where they were timid..as time went on. in particular when the chilean students first began their massive demos. i don't know if they can pull it off a global strike but they are trying and i wish them well and respect them even if they don't.

Unionist

[url=http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/societe/2012/06/05/006-manifestatio... continue in Montréal and Québec[/url]

Both demos were declared illegal, as usual.

In Québec City, demonstrators were caught in a police trap. Québec solidaire MNA and co-spokesperson Amir Khadir is among them.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Amir Khadir was apparently arrested

Unionist

Amir Khadir is under arrest - one of about 50 - for obstructing traffic.

One day this inhuman social order will fall.

A photo of Amir in handcuffs:

http://www.journaldequebec.com/2012/06/05/amir-khadir-arrete-lors-dune-m...

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