Classroom Integration: a New Brunswick story

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Caissa
Classroom Integration: a New Brunswick story

A New Brunswick grandmother of a young autistic boy is calling on the province's schools to eliminate isolation rooms.

Jean-Michel, 7, was pulled out of his Grade 1 class at Ecole Sainte-Bernadette in Moncton after Claire LaBelle saw the isolation room - also called a time-out room. She's now teaching her grandson at home.

School has proved difficult for Jean-Michel, who has Asperger's syndrome, which is a form of autism, and Tourette's syndrome.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/new-brunswick/story/2010/06/21/nb-moncton-inclusion-school-isolation-room-1113.html#ixzz0raCfd6gV

Caissa

A southeastern New Brunswick mother is calling for teachers and teachers' assistants to receive more training to deal with children with special needs.

Dee LeBlanc's eight-year-old adopted daughter has fetal alcohol syndrome, cerebral palsy and epilepsy.

LeBlanc says she has witnessed the difference a teacher can make between inclusion and exclusion for her daughter, Terry-Lynn.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/new-brunswick/story/2010/06/23/nb-inclusion-terry-lynn-551.html#ixzz0rgVaa8aZ

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

This is really interesting, Caissa.  We've had struggles of our own over adaptation and exclusion with our kids who are in the "gifted and talented" category - the assumption is that everything should be easy for them, but they have their own different needs and quirks.  We've found, like friends who have kids with Aspbergers, that there is very little training given on how to teach kids outside of a narrow band of "normal". 

Refuge Refuge's picture

Time out rooms can have a purpose, used when the child may hurt themselves or others (and depending on the circumstances destroy property) however the school board offers very little training on the appropriate time to use these spaces and even worse the appropriate time to let them out (it should never be once the child has calmed down, it should always be when they have stopped being violent).  They can be used to avoid restraining a child (also misused because of a lack of training) which, even when done properly can cause injury to the child or adult.

 It is because of this lack of training that these rooms can turn into very traumatic places.