I prefer the white poppy. How about you?

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ikosmos ikosmos's picture
I prefer the white poppy. How about you?
lil.Tommy

Has anyone approached the Legion about why they don't offer the White ones?

dacckon dacckon's picture

This wouldn't be controversial if a different flower and month were picked(Perferably in spring). There's no need for such a pointless rivalry.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Great question. The British Legion rejected the "No More War" label in the middle of the poppy and made it clear that the Red Poppy was a very determined political symbol of remembering British soldier deaths only, ignoring civilian deaths in war, and ignoring the deaths of other soldiers. It would not be an exaggeration to say that the red poppy now glorifies war. We hear that the Red Poppy is non-political; this is a despicable lie. It is a loud horn that excludes. The Ulster Unionists use the Red Poppy as a weapon against the minority in N Ireland, eg.

I'm very happy to see that FIFA, the international sporting body for soccer in the world, isn't buying the Legion bullshit and has told the English soccer players that they won't be allowed to wear political symbols, like the poppy, at FIFA events. Hurrah for FIFA.

Anyway, the bootlicking Canadian Legion has followed suit in much the same way. I've read about how the Red Poppy is a trade issue but, of course, what's to stop the Legion from making money by selling white poppies?

Why, nothing but sheer cussedness, love of war, and so on. But it's a great  idea to rub their dog noses in their own shit; if the poppy is a copyright issue, and the red poppy excludes, why not sell the white one?

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

I am considering wearing a White Feather to show solidarity with pacifists who were vilified for not wanting to be cannon fodder for the King. 

Unionist

Campaign is doing great in Québec, given that this is the first year it has been launched here, by the Collectif échec à la guerre (Stop War Coalition). Already almost 5,000 have been sold at $1 each.

You can read all about it [url=http://www.echecalaguerre.org/]here[/url].

edmundoconnor

ikosmos wrote:

 

I'm very happy to see that FIFA, the international sporting body for soccer in the world, isn't buying the Legion bullshit and has told the English soccer players that they won't be allowed to wear political symbols, like the poppy, at FIFA events. Hurrah for FIFA.

Given the very many problems that FIFA has, I'm not so sure you want to be cheering them.

edmundoconnor

ikosmos wrote:

The Ulster Unionists use the Red Poppy as a weapon against the minority in N Ireland, eg.

Where's your evidence for that? While I can easily believe the more extreme elements of Democratic Unionist Party supporters (aka Ian Paisley's merry gang) doing that, I'd like to see firm proof beyond stereotypes.

I'm also curious about how a poppy can be used as a 'weapon'. Do you thrust your chest out, smiling broadly, daring people to take issue with the poppy you're wearing? Offending people's sensibilities seems to be pretty trivial, especially in light of the fairly recent past there. In any case, any person using the poppy as a 'weapon' is an idiot, and unworthy of the men and women they are supposedly commemorating.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

They partially backed down.  FIFA is now allowing the Brits to wear an armband and the poppy on it.  The uniform though remains off limits and on it there will be no propaganda.

Like FIFA had become a progressive organization with a social conscious.  LOL

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

edmundoconnor wrote:

ikosmos wrote:

The Ulster Unionists use the Red Poppy as a weapon against the minority in N Ireland, eg.

Where's your evidence for that? While I can easily believe the more extreme elements of Democratic Unionist Party supporters (aka Ian Paisley's merry gang) doing that, I'd like to see firm proof beyond stereotypes.

Quote:

Contested Symbols in Northern Ireland

The poppy is a symbol across Europe for the loss of life in the World Wars. Poppies grew in the fields of Flanders after WW1. The Red symbolises the blood spilt.The Poppy has a strong meaning of commemoration for many people in the UK. Many lost ancestors in the world wars.

In Ireland Catholics have tended to stay away from wearing poppies out of a fear that it is glorifying English colonialism, and out of a desire to forget the history of Irish soldiers fighting for the British Army. This is changing now as Ireland re-engages with its British heritage. Pacifists prefer to wear a white poppy to make it clear they are not celebrating war in any way.

http://marie-mckeown.hubpages.com/hub/Symbols-Northern-Ireland

 

The Irish think so and since I am not there I would take their views seriously and not dismiss them out of hand.

Unionist

What's this about Unionists? Innocent

 

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

Okay it is clear that not all "unionists" like red poppies and some even like white.  Don't tell anyone in Belfast.

Polunatic2

Robert Fisk: Do those who flaunt the poppy on their lapels know that they mock the war dead?

Quote:
 But as the years passed, old Bill Fisk became very ruminative about the Great War. He learned that Haig had lied, that he himself had fought for a world that betrayed him, that 20,000 British dead on the first day of the Somme – which he mercifully avoided because his first regiment, the Cheshires, sent him to Dublin and Cork to deal with another 1916 "problem" – was a trashing of human life. In hospital and recovering from cancer, I asked him once why the Great War was fought. "All I can tell you, fellah," he said, "was that it was a great waste." And he swept his hand from left to right. Then he stopped wearing his poppy. I asked him why, and he said that he didn't want to see "so many damn fools" wearing it – he was a provocative man and, sadly, I fell out with him in his old age. What he meant was that all kinds of people who had no idea of the suffering of the Great War – or the Second, for that matter – were now ostentatiously wearing a poppy for social or work-related reasons, to look patriotic and British when it suited them, to keep in with their friends and betters and employers. 

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

I take issue with the VOW on this passage from the above link:

Quote:
He later told the chaplain of the unit what he meant when he wrote that critical line: "Take up our quarrel with the foe; To you from failing hands we throw the torch..." By foe, he meant war itself, and by torch he meant the passion and will to realize the ideal of putting an end to war itself.

I'd like to see their source for this little bit of apocrypha. It makes McCrae sound like a pacifist (he definitely wasn't) and it contradicts the plain meaning of the words of the poem, which have been universally taken to mean that McCrae was urging others to carry on the fight for which the soldiers died in Flanders Fields, and if they didn't they would be "breaking faith" with those war dead.

Here's a [url=http://whimsley.typepad.com/whimsley/2007/11/no-more-poppies.html]typical interpretation[/url]:

Quote:
McRae says that war is tragic and heroic; [Wilfred] Owen says it is tragic and futile. McRae demands that the death of soldiers be given meaning by continuing the war that caused their death. Owen demands that we admit the meaninglessness and criminality of those deaths and prevent further ones.

In Canada at least, the Poppy is now inextricably tangled with the McRae vision of soldiers and warfare. Here is the Canadian Legion's site:

Quote:
His poem speaks of Flanders fields, but the subject is universal – the fear of the dead that they will be forgotten, that their death will have been in vain. Remembrance, as symbolized by the Poppy, is our eternal answer which belies that fear.

Michelle

Northern Shoveler wrote:

I am considering wearing a White Feather to show solidarity with pacifists who were vilified for not wanting to be cannon fodder for the King. 

OMG, give me my brain back! ;)  Seriously, I was just thinking of this a few nights ago when I was reminded by a radio broadcast about young men who, during WW1, were given white feathers by patriotic women if they hadn't joined up, and then I read this thread and you've said it.  I think that would be a wonderful symbol.

Having been a huge fan of the Anne of Green Gables series while I was growing up, her final book in the series, Rilla of Ingleside, was very interesting in that it was clearly narrated from the angle of glorifying and romanticizing WWI.  The only real "pacifist" in the book was universally scorned in the village and had a horribly nasty and abrasive personality. 

But one story thread in the book was about one of Anne's sons, Walter, who was afraid to join up and used his convalescence from typhoid or tuburculosis (can't remember which) as an excuse not to join up for a while after he was already better.  And while away at university, he was given a white feather, and wrote to Rilla about how humiliating it was. 

Of course, eventually, he "did the right thing" and joined up, and that was the moral of the story.  But I thought it was interesting that Montgomery wrote quite sympathetically from the point of view of someone who didn't want to go, despite the book being such pure warmongering propaganda otherwise.

So, the white feather would be a beautiful symbol of protest against the glorification of war, and a show of solidarity with the pacifists of the time.

Unionist

M. Spector wrote:

I take issue with the VOW on this passage from the above link:

Yeah, much as I admire the VOW, I thought exactly the same thing when I read that attempt to sanitize In Flanders Fields.

 

takeitslowly

I simply not wear the red poppy because i dont believe in peer pressure.

Doug

I'd wear both if I could find the white one.

edmundoconnor

Northern Shoveler wrote:

http://marie-mckeown.hubpages.com/hub/Symbols-Northern-Ireland

 

The Irish think so and since I am not there I would take their views seriously and not dismiss them out of hand.

 

Huh. Thanks for the information. Interesting that poppies are seen as 'acceptable in the workplace' (bottom of the page). As with all things in Northern Ireland, a fascinating book could be written about the twists and turns of this symbol.

asthma_hound

Doug wrote:

I'd wear both if I could find the white one.

 

Likewise.

NDPP

definitely - Persian White my fave...

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

For those who are into numbers, this morning will pass through ... 11:11:11 on the 11th day of the 11th month of the 11th year.

That's 11:11:11 on 11 11 11 .

Orangutan

I always have troubling finding them being sold anywhere (other than online).

Does anyone know if they are sold in any stores?

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

They are not sold in stores. As post #5 above indicates, they are available in Quebec from the antiwar movement.

In Toronto, [url=http://socialistaction-canada.blogspot.com/]Socialist Action[/url] imported a supply of them from England and was selling them at Occupy Toronto and other political events this year.

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

As an ex service man, nope, don't like it at all.

Thanks.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Wouldn't want to be associated with anything anti-war, now, would we?

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

@mspector:

Wrong, that isn't what this is about.

I posted above, this is about rememberance. You know I am certain you know that the last person who belives in war is a miltary person. But, this is rememberance. That is all it is.

Don't confuse the two. If you want a white poppy, okay. But I don't favor its replacing the red one. One day a year we talk about rememberance, "Lest we forget", not only those who died but the horror of war. The fact the world is so slow to learn this lesson has nothing to do with the intent of the message.

That is all I am trying to say. Please don't try and read what is in my mind. I am pacifist. But I also believe my service was rightous. I don't see any contradiction there.

That is my respectful opinion.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

It's a dirty fight about what to remember, Arthur. War in the the 20th century was characterized by, among other things like ever new spectacular ways of killing large numbers of people all at once, the enormous numbers of civilian casualties in war. And yet, ... we are asked to remember soldiers who lose their lives in war ... and, mostly, forget about the truckloads of civilian dead.

That's odd, isn't it? I mean, when something new happens then we should pay attention to it, right?

We should, therefore, insist of putting front and centre the whole issue of non-soldier war dead. Civilians. And they are symbolized by ... the white poppy. The British, and Canadian, Legions didn't have the wisdom - still don't have the wisdom - to see that and instead wish to keep their heads firmly planted ... well, you can fill in the rest. 

It's a dirty fight about what to remember ... and what to forget.

 

 

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

@Ikosmos:

I said in my comments that many military men and women understand this is as much about civillian as military death. You are wrong to think that we (that is retired ad serving military) don't think about civillian casualities. My wife who served thinks that, I called a pal of mine who served in Afghanistan today about, and we all agree that it simply isn't right to say that this is as much about military or civillian deaths.

I get the white poppy, but I prefer the red.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

bump for the White poppy.

Slumberjack

The main highlights of Remembrance Day ceremonies includes the playing of The Rouse, which follows The Last Post, and the reciting of that terrible McCrae poem.  The Rouse signifies a recall of both the dead and the living to continued duty in battle, on behalf of the country which is run by corporate gangsters, who have always sent people off to die for somebody else's idea of profit.  The poem, In Flanders Fields says as much, ie: taking up the quarrel, along with the torch from flailing hands, not breaking faith, etc.  Breaking faith with what?  Why, the call to more and more sacrifice that gets spoken aloud every year at the ceremonies.  So, no, the Remembrance Day ritual is not about calling for an end to war, as much as some people like to think, unless there is no need for war anymore because we're the final victors of history.  I don't wear a poppy, I don't attend the ceremonies, I haven't laid eyes on my medals in years.  We go out with friends and do a legion crawl.

Sean in Ottawa

Slumberjack wrote:

The main highlights of Remembrance Day ceremonies includes the playing of The Rouse, which follows The Last Post, and the reciting of that terrible McCrae poem.  The Rouse signifies a recall of both the dead and the living to continued duty in battle, on behalf of the country which is run by corporate gangsters, who have always sent people off to die for somebody else's idea of profit.  The poem, In Flanders Fields says as much, ie: taking up the quarrel, along with the torch from flailing hands, not breaking faith, etc.  Breaking faith with what?  Why, the call to more and more sacrifice that gets spoken aloud every year at the ceremonies.  So, no, the Remembrance Day ritual is not about calling for an end to war, as much as some people like to think, unless there is no need for war anymore because we're the final victors of history.  I don't wear a poppy, I don't attend the ceremonies, I haven't laid eyes on my medals in years.  We go out with friends and do a legion crawl.

It is an important observation about the McCrae poem. I don't consider it terrible in itself. However, I interpret it differently. I see it as a reflection of the view of many of the flower of the new 20th century as they went off to die. This reflection, I think, was a popular one and perhaps explains why so many young men were able to be killed in the First World War without turning on those who sent them to die. If we were to have the same conditions for a similar percentage of our youth today, I think you would see a very different perspective. In that sense, I consider the McCrae poem a partial explanation. We have to remember that there was considerable anger at the loss of life at the time and without the "heroic naive" perspective of so many that anger could have boiled over into greater risk to the regimes that sent so many to die, so needlessly.

I agree of course that the raising up of the McCrae poem even today is horrid as is the interpretation that seeks to claim it as a perspective that should be honoured and maintained. In my view this perspective is central to what allowed so many to die in the First World War. The tie between that and the poppy symbol becomes more relevant as we consider these things. The white poppy seeks to oppose this. As many have said the white poppy offers no less remembrance but it seeks not to perpetuate the distortion of the glorification of death for country and a more appropriate human reaction.

That said there are a lot of emotions and reasons for wearing a poppy. Many years I have worn a red poppy when I have taken a position very opposed to the use, glorification and support of war. Some years I could not bring myself to do it.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Maybe wear both.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

It is still arguing over symbols which is a very privileged thing to do. Take your symbolism to corrupt FIFA and maybe they will give you a bribe as well. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Michelle wrote:

Northern Shoveler wrote:

I am considering wearing a White Feather to show solidarity with pacifists who were vilified for not wanting to be cannon fodder for the King. 

OMG, give me my brain back! ;)  Seriously, I was just thinking of this a few nights ago when I was reminded by a radio broadcast about young men who, during WW1, were given white feathers by patriotic women if they hadn't joined up, and then I read this thread and you've said it.  I think that would be a wonderful symbol.

Having been a huge fan of the Anne of Green Gables series while I was growing up, her final book in the series, Rilla of Ingleside, was very interesting in that it was clearly narrated from the angle of glorifying and romanticizing WWI.  The only real "pacifist" in the book was universally scorned in the village and had a horribly nasty and abrasive personality. 

But one story thread in the book was about one of Anne's sons, Walter, who was afraid to join up and used his convalescence from typhoid or tuburculosis (can't remember which) as an excuse not to join up for a while after he was already better.  And while away at university, he was given a white feather, and wrote to Rilla about how humiliating it was. 

Of course, eventually, he "did the right thing" and joined up, and that was the moral of the story.  But I thought it was interesting that Montgomery wrote quite sympathetically from the point of view of someone who didn't want to go, despite the book being such pure warmongering propaganda otherwise.

So, the white feather would be a beautiful symbol of protest against the glorification of war, and a show of solidarity with the pacifists of the time.

I agree with these retro posts in this thread.

 

swallow swallow's picture

Hey, I had to read that one in school! Still a terrific poem.

Didn't hear about McCrae until I noticed it was printed on money. 

quizzical

never read or heard it. thanks unionist.

Slumberjack

The white poppy, as a symbol of peace, is considered by many to be an insult to the memory of the dead who perished in the wars of the past century and counting.  A symbol of peace besmirched as representing an insult to the dead says plenty about what the red poppy has been turned into.

Sean in Ottawa

Slumberjack wrote:

The white poppy, as a symbol of peace, is considered by many to be an insult to the memory of the dead who perished in the wars of the past century and counting.  A symbol of peace besmirched as representing an insult to the dead says plenty about what the red poppy has been turned into.

There is a very long tradition of equating demonstrations of a desire for peace with cowardice and insult to those who fight. There is nothing new in any of this.

Unionist

World War I was genocide - just as surely as the Rwandan or Armenian or Jewish or other genocides - only on a much larger scale. It was a holocaust in the service of European and U.S. colonialism. And it ought to be commemorated in the same way as the other genocides. Not by glorifying the victims, but by understanding the causes and solemnly pledging: "Never again!"

Poem's like McRae's - which I had to sing in elementary school - should be exposed for the incitement to genocide that they are. They should be buried along with him.

Instead, this poem should be taught to every schoolchild.

Quote:
Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned out backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame, all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! - An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.-
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin,
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.


Slumberjack

No, nothing new, there never is, just degrees of the same.  There was after all the white feather movement.

Quote:
The poetry from the period indicates that the campaign was not popular amongst soldiers - not least because soldiers who were home on leave could find themselves presented with the feathers.

One such was Private Ernest Atkins who was on leave from the Western Front. He was riding a tram when he was presented with a white feather by a girl sitting behind him. He smacked her across the face with his pay book saying: "Certainly I'll take your feather back to the boys at Passchendaele. I'm in civvies because people think my uniform might be lousy, but if I had it on I wouldn't be half as lousy as you."

BRF

dacckon wrote:

This wouldn't be controversial if a different flower and month were picked(Perferably in spring). There's no need for such a pointless rivalry.

 The idea behind the white poppy is in disputation to what Remembrence Day and the red poppy has come to be. It is now a rememberence of military victory and glorification of military as a means of dispute settlement and of just our war dead. Instead of perhaps the mournful wail of an air raid siren at the national memorial on the day we are given the alluring sight and sound of artillery fire and a jet fighter fly over designating our military prowess and power as some sort of homage to the dead of wars. War is a curse to all the combatants and so we need to remember all of dead, civilian and soldier alike, we need to remember with fear of another war being perpetrated with all its horrors for the many and vast profits for the few. My father suffered terribly for most of his life from WWII memories. When as a teen I asked my mother why Dad always seemed so pessimistic I received a reply I will never forget.  "He just saw too many of his war buddies turned to goo"  Mom did a lot of work with Dad who after the war could not hold a job for a few years because he continually punched out foremen. You get the picture. I wear the white poppy.

Unionist

[url=http://echecalaguerre.org/wp-content/uploads/2015_10_31-declaration-coqu... is a full-page ad[/url] from Oct. 31 edition of Le Devoir - supporting Échec à la Guerre ["Stop War Collective"]'s 5th annual white poppy campaign - in memory of all victims of war. Not sure if it exists in English. It's signed and financed by (at least) 168 individuals and 57 organizations.

And there will be a silent vigil at 10:30 am on November 11, near the entrance to McGill campus.

And you can order these lovely white poppies online by clicking [url=http://echecalaguerre.org/acheter-en-ligne/coquelicots-blancs/]here[/url].

 

Mighty AC

Slumberjack wrote:

The white poppy, as a symbol of peace, is considered by many to be an insult to the memory of the dead who perished in the wars of the past century and counting.  A symbol of peace besmirched as representing an insult to the dead says plenty about what the red poppy has been turned into.

I am grateful to our veterans and angry with those who create war and conflict for selfish ends. I believe that is the point of the white poppy; however, I worry about veterans not understanding the message and seeing it as an insult. I don't know how many times I've had to explain to an angry friend/colleague/acquaintance/stranger at the pub that I very much support and respect our soldiers and vets but am often opposed to the missions and the decision makers that would send them into battle. As awkward as it is, I feel the more we have that conversation the better.

Anyway, I wear the red poppy, with an actual backed centre pin so I don't lose it, I thank military men and women when I see them, I argue with those who are quick to suggest battle and violent "solutions" to problems and on the 11th I drop into the local legion and leave cash with the bartender to anonymously purchase drinks for veterans.

Slumberjack

Apparently red poppies were about the only thing that would grow in the bombarded Northern European fields during WWI.  Something to do with all the lime upturned and mixed in with the upper layers of mud and topsoil with the shelling.  In places where cemeteries began to proliferate and there was a chance for a settling of the ground, red poppies would be among the first to appear and grow atop and in between the graves of the troops buried there.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

WWII was different from other wars. I remember going to the cenotaph with my late father. He would have been 94 this year on Rememberance Day. He taught me that war was wrong and should be avoided at all costs. He was a vet and a Diefenbaker fan and he taught me about peace. I have no thank you's for the thousands of Afghan veterans of the longest war in our history.  I have apologies for Canada having sent them into another country as an invasion force.

Our armed forces today are not forces of good in the world and should be withdrawn from the imperial actions abroad not thanked for their unsuccessful attempt to be the conquerors of Afghanistan. Our fleet has been on a war footing since the first Gulf war and is stationed in Bahrain where the majority of the people want the base closed. They are violently suppressed by their Monarch with our Saudi allies in support using Canadina made Strykers.

It is time we got back to having a peace celebration not a war glorificaton day.

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

WWII was different from other wars. I remember going to the cenotaph with my late father. He would have been 94 this year on Rememberance Day. He taught me that war was wrong and should be avoided at all costs. He was a vet and a Diefenbaker fan and he taught me about peace. I have no thank you's for the thousands of Afghan veterans of the longest war in our history.  I have apologies for Canada having sent them into another country as an invasion force.

Our armed forces today are not forces of good in the world and should be withdrawn from the imperial actions abroad not thanked for their unsuccessful attempt to be the conquerors of Afghanistan. Our fleet has been on a war footing since the first Gulf war and is stationed in Bahrain where the majority of the people want the base closed. They are violently suppressed by their Monarch with our Saudi allies in support using Canadina made Strykers.

It is time we got back to having a peace celebration not a war glorificaton day.

This is why the Poppy is so controversial. Many in previous generations wore it as memory of the horror of war and not for the reasons more recent propaganda promotes. It is reasonable for some to wear the white Poppy but it is also reasonable that some may want to reclaim -- or claim -- a different meaning for the Red Poppy. McRae's poem is significant but it does not represent the exclusive interpretation of the events and individuals the Poppy symbol has been associated with. And the interpretation of the poem and what it means goes further even than McCrae's intentions. McCrae was a participant swept up into the swell. He expresses an opinion that reflects the propaganda that sent him and many others off to war. There is no requirement to withhold all sympathy for him or deny a point to his expression.

McCrae himself had an option to not be part of a fighting unit given that he was over 40 but chose to do so anyway. At some point in all the slaughter he expresses the feelings of dying soldiers in a context where they needed -- he needed -- assurance that there was a point and purpose and that their deaths could be part of something positive. To take this poem out of the context of a person on the battlefield as an advice of national purpose and approach to war -- 100 years later even --  is a denial of what the poem really represented. These were men who ended up in fields of slaughter grasping for a purpose and meaning of it all and in that context calling on others to honour their loss with more of the same.

I really do not take much issue with the poem representing what the dying could feel looking to future soldiers to continue the fight as this is what you would expect. I do take issue with the propaganda of bringing that insanity back from the battlefield to present as part of an instruction to the future -- to learn for remembrance each year in each generation. This poem is the mother of all out-of-context messages.

A fair analogy for the poem could be a person drowning grasping catching on to others dragging them under the water.

The poem and the poppy are not the problem. The interpretation and presentation is.

The white poppy is an answer to this but so too is an attempt to reclaim some other meaning to the original red poppy and a more mature understanding of what it can mean.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture
laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I'm having a hard time using that interface for ordering the white poppies. I understand the minimum order is 10 poppies but I can't get that order confirmed - it somehow doubled my order to 20 poppies. I don't think I will see enough rememberance days moving forward to need 19 in inventory :-)

Paladin1

$10.00 for an order of white poppies?!  Plus shipping?  At least red ones go for donations lol   Someone should get the Royal Canadian legion to start selling these white ones, you would be able to buy them much cheaper.

 

Really though the only thing a white poppy is really good for is giving Legion members something else to bitch about between November 1st and November 10th on the internet.

 

 

Maysie Maysie's picture

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